Another Coilman?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Another Coilman?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 09:46 am:

A friend was going through some old coils, looking for some that might be worth rebuilding when he found this one.

Coilman

He had the coil for several years and was wondering if this was an earlier Ron Patterson rebuild or perhaps Ron's grandfather taught him the trade.

I said I had no idea, but I might be able to find out for sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 10:17 am:

Jim
About three years ago I started branding my rebuilt coils as shown above. So many people were rebuilding coils I wanted to be able to easily identify my work.
A customer, who shall remain unnamed, called me after receiving his rebuilt coils and excoriated me for placing advertising and adding graffiti to his coils.
The fellow was totally unreasonable and refused to accept anything I offered to resolve the problem to his satisfaction.
At that point I stopped branding rebuilt coils and, needless to say, added the seventh name in 22 years, to my GTH list of unreasonable people never to deal with in the future.
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 10:29 am:

Ron; Why not put that brand on the inside of the cover? Seems that would be an easy to identify your coils. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 10:31 am:

You know, honestly, don't think I'd want that either. Maybe some thing hidden would have been OK. Like a business card on the inside of the removable door.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 12:21 pm:

WTF ???? The coils are hidden in a box - no one can see the "brand" anyway - unbelievable Ron - I've got my own GTH list too but it's GFY !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 12:32 pm:

Steve,

Can you imagine opening the box up and saying, "WTF these are NFG! GFY!". You'd be SOL and plenty PO'd. What a CF that would be!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 12:37 pm:

That's totally funny Jerry !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 12:37 pm:

Well Jerry, you almost made it. Can you write a paragraph that uses the entire alphabet in acronyms? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 12:41 pm:

Well guys I don't own a 1000 point Hershey car, I own one that I drive the P*** out of I fix what breaks and drive some more so for me none of the above makes me GAF or GARA But the thing that scares me is I have been retired from the U.S.Navy for 23 years and I didn't even have to think about the abbreviations... I guess you never outgrow some things.:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 12:47 pm:

GR
Retired from the Navy for 19 years and I had no trouble reading it either!
SNAFU, FUBAR, AFU... the list goes on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 01:12 pm:

Lacking a few days it's been 50 years since i left the army and all i remember is hay went in one end of Grants horse and SH came out the other end!! Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - West Melbourne Florida on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 01:24 pm:

Its just me but I don't see any harm in branding your work. If by chance the coil was ever resold the new owner would know where to go to get it rebuilt again if ever needed, And like mentioned, The coil is hidden in its box.

My first year in the Army was just learning all the military acronyms. The one that confused me the most was FTR. I got an UCMJ article 15 once and I had to ask what it was. Failure To Repair. To which I asked, What didn't I repair! Seems that could mean just about anything.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 01:32 pm:

You can be sure that a coil with the "Coilman" stamp will not be a POS, or DOA. That's not his MO.

I'm done now, QED


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 01:55 pm:

Will, I always heard that FTR stood for "Factory Thorough Repair". Now you have me scared about all the guns I've fired that were stamped FTR.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 02:08 pm:

Steve
Thanks for the tip on renaming my shop GTH list.
Your idea more closely reflects my actually views about Mr. "graffiti on the coils".
Ron Patterson


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 03:36 pm:

Now this has been an entertaining thread !!!

Most, if not all "artists" sign their work - some maybe more inconspicuous than others but rightly signed, none the less.

You are most welcome, Ron - although my list is shorter than yours - I'm getting pretty selective on who's T I'll work on anymore !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 03:48 pm:

I wouldn't want a name stamp on my coils. The tar inside the box however is firm and shiny. There is enough room to stamp it with a name, address, phone number and more. You could even fill in the letters with gold leaf for a touch of class.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 04:26 pm:

When working on an old something, I find the previous repairs' notes enlightening, and tell me a little of the history of the object. When I tune a piano, I have a "record of service" sticker I use inside. I recently worked on a piano where I found, under the keys (where no one would ever see it except a repair person) a very neatly stamped name, location and date--hand written notes are normal, not stamped ones. It told me the piano had been in the area at least since 1925. Ron, perhaps a sticker (return address label size)with the date of repair would be more acceptable. Those that don't like it could peel it off! When I install a new ballast or an LED lamp, I magic marker it with the date of install. BTW, I find most modern "electronic ballasts" seem to last about 6 months beyond their warranty--not like the old ones that can sometimes last for 25 years or more! An electrical engineer admitted to me that the "energy-saving" units have a short life-span.
But I'm getting off subject. I think knowing when something was repaired is very useful information & who's going to see it inside the coil-box??
OH, BTW, next time you see a train go by, look at the undercarriage; you'll see every brake air cylinder with "COTS" and a date painted on it--that stands for "Cleaned, Oiled, Tested, Stenciled" which lets the railroad know when it was last serviced & when to do it again---unless it was, as we said at Solano Railcar, "FWT"--Fixed With Stencil!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 04:40 pm:

Keeping in mind that this thread wasn't started to question someone's business practices, nor a customers personal preference for originality or authenticity, it does make one wonder whether an engine rebuilder permanently etching their name across the bottom of the oil pan would be deemed as trivial.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Barrett in Auburn Ca. on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 04:58 pm:

I stamp the pan rail of every block we babbit. It is interesting to see the names and dates of prior work on them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 05:02 pm:

I hope your guy don't send me any, Ron. I have stamped everyone I've ever done. In all fairness, I have sold a lot more outright, than I have repaired of other people's, but I stamped them nonetheless. Your brand looks to be on the very bottom. Mine is on the '2 contact' side near the bottom. You can't see it when they're in the box, but you can tell if a coil is yours upon quick inspection. It's not advertising. It's identification.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 05:13 pm:

I guess my thought about somebody stamping their work would be "what's the BFD???"

Some people have way too much time and apparently nothing to do with it.

I used to stamp my carbs with a little tiny "Howe" steel stamp but quit doing when the steel stamp got dull. Never had anybody complain, guess I was lucky.

David, as you know I spent years and years as a violin repairman and still do a little of that for myself and friends.

One of the joys of that business for me was finding a signature or initials and a date inside the instrument. I've had them dating back to the 1700's in English, Italian, German and some other languages I didn't recognize. My practice was always to sign the inside and date it if I had the top off or the body apart and did staking or repair work inside, which I think is pretty standard with bowed instrument repair people. Guitar people seldom remove tops so I don't know if they sign or not as a general practice. Violin tops are lightly glued on and popping the top off is pretty common.

For work that doesn't need the top off, I put my name in hard pencil in the crotch of the bridge with the date and/or put my name and the date on the treble side of the fingerboard in hard pencil. On the black ebony it is not very noticeable. That is also where I date code new ones, who the supplier or maker is, what I paid for it, etc. You can put a lot in a little 3/16's x 1 inch space on the side of a fingerboard.

A few years ago I had one that I had signed when I worked in Ben Setran's shop in Billings in the late 60's. His signature was below mine. I was pretty pleased to find that and it brought back a lot of memories of the wonderful man who shared his lifetime of knowledge with me and kept instruments alive and playable for nearly 80 years until he died at 97. Ben loved finding and studying old repair work, "Pretty foxy" he would say, "Whoever did this was just pretty foxy." Or he would say, "We'll have to do this one over and improve it a little if we can."

Inside old violins a Latin phrase is often found that translates to: When I lived in the forest I was silent, but joy to God, in death a luthier bade my voice to sing. That or something very similar also hangs in one form or another in virtually every violin shop in the world. I can't write it in Latin without looking it up.

How is this for thread drift????

Coffee over, back to the shop. Back to the shop.

No rest for the wicked.

There is joy in doing good work.

Busy hands have no time for tomfoolery.

The longest journey begins with the first step.

Carburetor restoration starts with taking out a screw (now it starts with taking a series of digital photos for documentation of what was missing for parts, how it goes back together, etc)

I just made that last one up. =)

Etc., Etc.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 05:19 pm:

Always interesting to read your musings, Stan.

Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim moore, "Island City" MI on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 06:13 pm:

I have had "coilman" coils but they didn't have a brand on them. If they did I would pull them out and show people that these are the good ones and I can prove it then put them back in!

Tim Moore


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis E. Towle on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 07:58 pm:

Wow that sucks Ron! You can brand mine when I send them off this spring.

Travis Towle
Topeka, Kansas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Van Evera in the U.P. of MI. on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 08:30 pm:

Jerry you crack me up!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 08:52 pm:

Where's the need of identifying your work by external/permanent marking? On coils the inside of the removable door is just as good if not better. Most people that have their coils rebuilt by others don't have the ability or possibly the time to do it themselves and wouldn't look inside anyway so they'd probably never know AND if they were ever sent back it would be clearly apparent who did any previous work. Don't know what the situation was with Ron P's disgruntled customer but I don't think I'd like him defacing the coils that came in a (possibly) family heirloom car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 11:14 pm:

Years ago I used to make exact replica five string banjo necks for converting historic four string banjos. I would include the old neck with the banjo in case the owner wanted to convert it back to four string. Unlike guitars, banjo necks are easily removed by a couple of screws once the strings were taken off the instrument.

I had a steel die made with my name in raised letters and I pounded this on the inside heel of the neck where it fit the body. It could not be sanded off .. or the neck wouldn't fit correctly. But I'm sure there were times when people were surprised to find that when taking a banjo apart for installing a new head.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Thursday, January 07, 2016 - 11:18 pm:

I always figure radiator shops mark their work.
If the unit doesn't have a serial number you almost gotta put your mark on the unit when you repair it for money, and gaurentee it,
t.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Borland. Bathurst. NSW. Australia. on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 08:01 am:

G'day
Henry put his mark all over his work, so what is the problem identifying your work. Pride in one's work should not be condemned. Tell the twit to go to buggery.

Peter


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 08:11 am:

But someone must have messed with the coil in the original post after it left the Coilman's shop? There's a wire that looks like it should be soldered to the contact?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 08:53 am:

Charlie is correct.

I am baffled by folks inability to distinguish the difference between a craftsman's mark in an inconspicuous location and one which is clearly seen on the outside which changes the original appearance of the part.

Even more baffling is the need to use expletives.

All that said, if this was only practiced for 3 years, then I would say that James has a limited edition collectors coil. I will be on the lookout at swap meets as it should only increase in value.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kurt Baltrusch on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 09:36 am:

OT kinda I was in Colorado last week and saw a car with the WTF bumper sticker. When I got close in small letters underneath it said "Welcome to Fruita". I never knew it meant that!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 05:08 pm:

Thanks Joe, looking forward to seeing you "Up North" this summer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold R Carpenter - Fair Grove, MO on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 07:06 pm:

Ron has rebuilt several coils for me. He does excellent work. I would be proud to have his stamp on my coils.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 08:34 pm:

Like Harold I would be proud to have Ron's stamp,on my coils.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 08:47 pm:

No problem. As long as he asks first. Or makes it removable. Or hides it.


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