OT Tour Map with Speed Limits

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: OT Tour Map with Speed Limits
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rod Barrett - Anderson, IN on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 05:02 pm:

Does anyone know of a good map program for laying out Model T tours? I have been searching Google with little success. I need a program that can lay out a route with a maximum speed limit of 35 mph. It would be nice if it could show points of interest along the way.

Mapquest allows you to select a bicycle route, but I'm not sure of the speed limits on that route.

Thanks, Rod.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 05:08 pm:

I can't answer your question, but I'd be careful about using "bicycle routes". You may get routed in part on a bike path and end up in a real pickle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale Peterson College Place, WA on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 05:14 pm:

Maximum speed limits of 35 mph will be in town driving pretty much. What you are mostly going to be liking for are back roads. Google maps lets you select "avoid toll roads" and avoid highways. Whatever you do, you will need to drive your rout on the day of the week and time of day you plan the tour to travel. The season of the year can also make a big difference.
An example of this is on a tour to east central Oregon, I have traveled over 100 miles on highway 395 south of Pendleton and only encountered about a dozen cars both directions, on a weekday mid day.
I have also driven some back roads in the Seattle area, Texas, and Florida that I would not even consider traveling in a Model T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 06:41 pm:

You can buy a book at most big book stores that show satellite generated maps of all Indiana roads. These are very good . Most of the States are available.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 07:09 pm:

I've laid out a lot of tours for early cars, including some for VERY early cars, like 1-and 2-cylinder cars and highwheelers. I use a program called Map My Fitness. It's designed for hikers and bikers, but it works very well. It will give you distances to .01 miles. It will show you gradients. If you switch to the satellite view, you can get such a close-up of the intersections that you can usually tell which ones have traffic lights, and sometimes stop signs, as well as seeing whether you're in the boonies or in a built-up area. Whatever you use, Dale Peterson is absolutely right: you MUST put the rubber on the road and check your route before you send a bunch of antique cars out on it. Doing that will let you clarify your instructions. Is a sign hard to see? Maybe that instruction should say something like: First right after mailbox 731. And, of course, driving the road in a modern car will tell you whether an intersection that looked harmless on the map is, in fact, scary as hell for an antique car driver.

You're not going to able to use only roads with speed limits of 35 mph or less. But you can pick roads with wide shoulders, so you can pull over if you're developing a tail of PO'd modern drivers.

Route planning can be fun. And, if you have no mechanical skills (as is my case), it lets you give back to the hobby in a meaningful way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 07:28 pm:

If the roads are anything like Ohio in the spring and summer months, "Eyes On" is a must. The orange cones pop up everywhere. Or detours to roads that may be Model T unfriendly. Probably wouldn't hurt to have an alternate route.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Sunday, January 10, 2016 - 03:53 am:

Having planned and worked out the route, be sure to drive over it yourself, preferably in a T, so you can make sure that all is as it seems from the maps that you have used.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, January 10, 2016 - 10:57 am:

Check your state highway department website. Some states have good maps you can use. I found quite a variety. The Kansas maps are excellent, Oklahoma's are OK, and Colorado's pathetic. Maybe Indiana will have some you can use.

My vast experience in this field consists of planning one tour. :-) I agree that driving the route is a must. Ideally you do it in a vehicle that measures tenths of a mile so you can make an accurate itinerary, and also in a T.

I gave an itinerary and a map for each car. The itinerary listed each leg of the tour, showing distances in miles and tenths.




The maps showed the route marked in green.

What could possibly go wrong? Some of the navigators had trouble matching the itineraries to to the maps. If I ever do this again, I'll number each item in the itinerary and put each number, large and in RED on the map.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, January 10, 2016 - 12:25 pm:

Have done a few, the old fashion way by using state maps, and the printed DeLorme Atlas & Gazetteer Map of local backroads and sites, trails, with GPS grids, most states are covered by this map company.

Once you lay out the pathways, then off in the modern vehicle and run each and every route. Carefully note turns and distance of each leg.

By that way you can print out a rather easy to read tour booklet, where most participants can drive without getting too lost :-)

If you have others run the routes, here are some suggestions for the driver and must have passenger recording the details for each route:

#1 the driver must not over shoot the turns! Slow down and pull over if necessary so the mileage and any errors can be noted! Notes do no good, if you can't read them! Run it in a modern vehicle with the best odometer and a compass, if possible! Plus or minus 1/10 of a mile is OK.

#2 the navigator should READ ALOUD the instructions, so you both consider the clarity, etc. You may want to repeat the reading on a longer run. Make sure the LEFTs and RIGHTs are correct, because it's easy to overlook it!

#3 Keep an eye out for comfort and gas stops. If there's a question of acceptability, please stop and check it out! Ad a NOTE: if you see one, either mid way on a longer run, or 10-20 miles after breakfast or lunch stops.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Sunday, January 10, 2016 - 02:10 pm:

It is also Very Helpful when using directions like Dan has to include the total mileage at each point.

Dan's is a perfect example of an easy to follow set of directions. When following these it's good to know how far to the next turn if it's 1/2 mile or 12 miles. Many of us use a GPS on tours that shows the total miles at each turn so you always know when your lost and can see the total distance of the tour for the day.

Another thing to be careful of is when you Reuse a tour route that was used in the past. If you don't prerun the route lots of things could change and you end up having a bunch of Model T's driving every which way. Of course that's part of the fun.

Another helpful piece of information on the sheet is the actual Location/Address of the meeting point. I've been lost and when trying to find where our meeting place is if you have an address you can always find your way.

Thanks to everyone that spends the time and effort to make these maps up for the guys on tours. They're always Very Much appreciated!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Sunday, January 10, 2016 - 03:26 pm:

Just get behind me .....

Seriously ......

I drive slower than your Grandma,
on her way to visit that relative she does not like,
in the winter, with a flat tire .....


Freighter Jim


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