Removing the Hogshead

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Removing the Hogshead
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Bourgeois on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 09:40 pm:

I am in the process of replacing the hogshead. I have done searches and come up with the same instructions and videos. Some help but not a lot.

Do I need to wire the bands before I remove the head? Could the bands be wired after?
I canít seem to get a wire under the pedals shafts.
Would it be possible to loosen the adjustments all the way but not take the bolt off to gain enough space to put a wire underneath?
I have seen Mike Benders video. I will follow closely to putting in the o rings and such. The replacement hogshead will be cleaned. Mike paints the inside with a red paint. Since the rest of the motor is not painted on the inside, would it make sense to paint the inside of the hogshead?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 09:58 pm:

When you remove the hogsheads you just loosen the band adjustment. No need to wire them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 10:02 pm:

The red is not paint,but Electrical Varnish. It allows oil to drain back into sump better and also prevents corrosion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Friday, January 08, 2016 - 10:14 pm:

Steve, the red paint is called Glyptal and is around $50.00 a quart. I thought about it, then punted. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 01:26 am:

W.W.Granger sells it in a spray can for @$7/can.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 06:03 am:

My thinking is that the Glyptal needs a perfectly clean and oil free surface to stay in place, like after sand blasting - without such a cleaning it may clog up the oil line etc, so it's too much risk for a very small gain in my book - there won't be any corrosion inside the engine as long as it's used and kept in a garage - and gravity will ensure the oil will run back in time, painted or not ;)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 06:07 am:

Securing new wound coils with Glyptal is a whole different story - on the coil ring, the Glyptal is needed. Though I wouldn't dare trying it on old coils..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 12:20 pm:

IMO Glyptal is a great addition to the inside of the motor. Have used it many years, and it will not flake off period! There is no contact on that painted surface that could even begin to cause it to wear or flake. Good stuff, its been around for years and years.


The pan is just steel, and if you are fastidious enough and take the time, lots of lacquer thinner, you can clean all the oil away, and the Glyptal will coat on just fine and stay.

For me its great, look at the underside of this inspection cover as removed, the oil is just gently gliding over the metal surface, that is what happens inside too :-)



Works fine in the pan, and the hogshead too,



So, if you can clean these parts as you would a dinner plate and mom's pots and pans, so its free of dirt and grease, this paint is super.

Would agree with Roger, don't try on a magneto coil ring, that's just impossible task to get that old gummy gooey ring and coils clean enough to paint even for this scrubber :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 01:35 pm:

It is not worth poo on an old coil ring....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Bourgeois on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 06:55 pm:

I have been able to pull the hogs head. It seems that the hose clamp is the reason I couldn't get a good brake pedal. The brake pedal would hit the hogshead no matter how tight the adjustment. Now for the questions:
How are the drums?
Is the starter ring look right?
Any comments are greatly appreciated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Bourgeois on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 06:56 pm:



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Bourgeois on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 06:57 pm:



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 07:52 pm:

Hose clamp????

That's a new one on me, I don't remember seeing that in the Ford parts book! :-O


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 08:10 pm:

Steve, looks like you have a crack in the housing, hence the reason the clamp was put there. I would take the clamp off and take a look at that while you have it apart.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Bourgeois on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 08:17 pm:

I have a replacement hogshead. This one is going to retire.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 08:23 pm:

Steve, it looks like you have a gasket either side of the ball cap, only one on the engine side is used.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 10:49 pm:

If you have an aluminum hogshead, clean it thoroughly and Glyptal it, that way it won't seep oil afterwards. Glyptal has been around for many decades, mostly as an insulating coating, but it has also been used to seal porous aluminum castings for at least that long too.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration