Old Photo - Model T Era - MOTO Naphta Mobile Fueling Units

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Old Photo - Model T Era - MOTO Naphta Mobile Fueling Units
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 11:13 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 12:00 pm:

got a hundred pumps but not that one,i want one, i -might trade the 10 for one.ha,ha. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 12:05 pm:

Portable gas station. US?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Layden Butler on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 12:32 pm:

I am going to guess Germany. Synthetic gasoline made from coal?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 01:32 pm:

Naptha and gasoline were, in the time before automobiles, both cleaning solvents developed from petroleum. They both can be used as fuel in automobiles. The pumps may actually be used for gasoline, I bet folks in most parts of the world thought of the two chemicals as about the same thing back then.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Saturday, January 09, 2016 - 03:05 pm:

Well my modern day truck might make it from pump to pump for fill ups!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, January 10, 2016 - 01:32 am:

One thing you find quickly when studying really early cars (pre 1900) is that there were several early fuels used. Gasoline, and gasolene, and naptha, and naphtha, were among the most commonly used. Of course, also, you quickly learn that "gasoline" today, is NOT the same thing as gasolene or gasoline was before 1910. The definition has changed dozens of times over the century.
Kerosene, coal oil, and a dozen other oil formulations were also used as engine fuels, and named as the fuels used in early engines. All of these various formulations varied a little, or a lot, or were the same thing called by different names. Some early records will list the fuels a car or an engine was designed to run on, and may list more than one fuel. Gasolene (by several spellings) and naptha (also several different spellings) were often both listed as fuels for the same engine or automobile.

The origin of the photo above might be helpful. The spelling is a bit unusual. Wikipedia prefers the spelling "naphtha", and offers considerable history in the etymology of the word. In short, it is a flammable gaseous mixture, or petroleum distillate. English and American histories seem to prefer the "naptha" spelling, with the "t" and "h" reversed from the carts in the photo above.
To some extent, a rose is a rose. I recall reading years ago about one of the great races in the early decade (I think it was the New York to Paris 1908 race), where a gasoline car (one of the racers) was low on fuel, fearing the loss of days worth of travel waiting for a delivery shipment when they located a local source of naptha (or napthlene) used in local motorboats and happily ran it in their car. The way the history was written and retold, it appeared that the fuel was something significantly different than gasoline. I have always suspected it was maybe a slightly different fuel, but mostly only a difference in language. I would suspect the photo above was from somewhere in Europe, but a quick look for by me did not confirm the spelling to any particular area or language. The visible motorcycle and partially visible car could be from anywhere in the world, and appear to be mid to late '10s.
Wonderful, and interesting, photo. On many levels.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Sunday, January 10, 2016 - 10:02 am:

I'm like Charley. I want one. Maybe more so now than a visible pump. Never seen one of these.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Sunday, January 10, 2016 - 10:38 am:

I believe the photo was taken oversea's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Norton on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 12:20 am:

France http://theoldmotor.com/?p=7904
Scene has a French look to it.


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