Old Photo - Hoover Wagon :-)

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Old Photo - Hoover Wagon :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 12:40 am:

A "Hoover wagon" was an automobile with horses hitched to it because the owner could not afford fuel during the great depression.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A Falconer on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 12:51 am:

Also known as a Bennett Buggy in Canada, named after Prime Minister Richard Bennett, 1930-35

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bennett_buggy

(Message edited by organicfarmboy on January 11, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 09:06 am:

Tuhorse Tudor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren F Rollins on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 09:15 am:

Is that a Ruckstell two speed? Seriously.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 09:29 am:

Having owned horses, I would think that proper care of that pair of equines would be at least as expensive as gasoline for the T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 09:30 am:

I thought the same thing, he must have had the horses for another purpose already.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 10:15 am:

Guess they were still using horses for farming in the early 30's, everyone didn't buy Fordsons during the 20's?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 10:33 am:

There were tractors in the teens, and more in the twenties, but it was the Allis Chalmers Model B, introduced in 1938, that drove the final nail in the coffin of horse-drawn agriculture. A lot of small farmers who had still been using horses made the change to a Model B, and later a Model C, in the forties.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 10:36 am:

I get the concept of a "Hoover Wagon" or a "Bennett Buggy", but what's up with this rig? It looks like the chassis has been shortened, with the section between the front cross member and the fire wall having been removed, along with the radiator, engine and hood.

Very strange. I don't get it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 10:44 am:

Roger and Steve,

We were all typing at the same time. My grandfather worked his ranch (grapes and prunes) with a team of mules until 1946. The place was on a hill and only when he sold it and bought another place in the valley did he become "mechanized". The new place (prunes, apricots $ walnuts) came with a late teens model Holt and the TT that I have today.

The 20th century arrived a little late for him. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 10:54 am:

Over here, most small farms weren't mechanized until right after WW2 with the UK made Ferguson tractor, much like the Ford N series that were sold in the states. Then soon enough during the 60's most small farmers became industrial workers - if you wanted to keep on farming you had to loan and buy the neighboring farms and become big enough to be profitable. And it has continued ever since..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Husa on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 02:36 pm:

ADD 18 more any you have a real Model T


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Holland, Utah on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 02:44 pm:

When we had a farm in Summit County, Utah; the guy who mowed our field mowed with a team of horses. There were a few Allis Chalmers orange tractors around, but the thrifty farmers did not want to wear them out. Later we got a 1962 Ferguson tractor and had a International Harvester with a trailing wheel sickle bar mower. It took most of a day to hook it to the tractor. Looking at the Hoover Wagon makes a lot of sense if you were a farmer. You had the horses for the farm anyway and you could travel inside in style.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 03:29 pm:

I started driving a C Allis when i was 6 And i don't think any one tractor put horse farming out?? If there was one tractor that actually did it the Farmall M would be a better choice!! Bud in Wheeler,Mi.PS,I remember when Dad was going to save gas and pull the 2-14'S used by the F-20 with our C Allis,i had to get the F-20 to get the plow's out of the ground!!!!!!!!!!!!Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 11:26 pm:

Back in the late 50's my father purchased several early Case automobiles in the wheat country of eastern Washington.

The farmer, he purchased the cars from was still farming with horses. All the tack was hung on huge school room clothing hooks. In 1912 when he purchased his new 1912 Case touring, he drove a team of horses to Spokane to the Case dealer and traded them in on the Case. They offered him $1000.00 trade in for the team and tack. The cost of the car was $2750.00 which the balance was paid in cash. Interesting he farmed with horses drove a Case automobile but no Case tractors, go figure.
just sayin'
brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 12:10 am:

The first successful small tractor built by Allis Chalmers was the WC in 1933. It was produced virtually unchanged for almost 20 years. It is still popular, so popular that a guy wrote a book about his love of them, I think, Rusty Tractors and the Men Who Love Them, or something like that. It was followed by the B in 37 - the first tractor to sell for less than $500 complete with rubber tires and only about $60 more for electric starting. Later came the C, the WC and the WD, then the WD45 in 1953. The WD is still a good tractor, there are thousands of them around and are still used on a lot of small farms. Their shortcoming was their hydraulic system, IHC and Oliver had much better hydraulics. John Deere and Ford had better hydraulics but not as good as IHC on the 300 and 350 Utilities.

By the 50's in eastern Montana where I grew up there were very few horses still being used to farm with. Their main use was on a bob sled feeding in the winter time. Horses always start, know the route to take and will pull the hay rack along while you pitch hay off or throw bales to the cows or sheep so you don't need another man to drive the tractor while you feed.

Here is my 1955 AC WD45 baling with a New Holland 276 baler behind three or four years ago. Good tractors.

Little thread drift.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 05:10 am:

Henry P, Do you still have the Holt??? I would love to see pictures of it. My grandfather and his dad had a big Holt back in the mid '10s. they ran it at ranches farther South in the Central Valley. They also farmed beans themselves.
My grandfather then tried farming up by Corning for a few years before settling on peaches outside Modesto (near Empire).
He used horses until 1935 when he was nearly killed being kicked in the face by one of his horses. The horses were sold almost as soon as he came home from the hospital. It was tractors from then on. I was driving tractors almost as soon as I could walk (from either his or my dad's lap). I was driving the N series Fords solo, and pulling trailers out of the orchards, when I was six. He also had a rubber tired McCormick tractor that I really loved to drive. I never was allowed to solo on it. They believed it was too dangerous. Whenever I look back at those days, I am amazed that they let me drive the Fords the way they did.
Some day, I have got to get down your way and see your place! And of course, the TT!
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 07:05 am:

Wayne,

No, the Holt is long gone. I barely remember it when I was a little kid. My memory of it is that it was covered in a light rust patina, all the paint gone. He traded it in on a much newer and better running Caterpillar Two Ton sometime in the early 1950's.

To put this in perspective for those who don't know, Caterpillar made the Two Ton for about 4 years and discontinued it in about 1929, so we're talking a 25-30 year old piece of equipment being the "new" tractor. I can remember the smile on his face when he got that ol' used Two Ton. He would not have been as happy with a brand new caddy. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 08:04 am:

I don't remember Hoover Wagons but I do remember my Uncle talking about a Hoover Hog and Hooverville's (tent city's) all over Texas he explained that a Hoover Hog was an armadillo and that during the depression .22 LR was better than money for buying stuff. :-)


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