Steering Shaft Repair, Temporary Lathe

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Steering Shaft Repair, Temporary Lathe
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 07:24 am:

Assembling the steering column for my 24, I ran into a problem. The steering shaft was bent. I went to my supply of steering columns and took apart three more before I found a straight one. This was a 5:1. It was arrow straight, but was heavily pitted where it goes through the frame bracket. I repaired it with JB Weld, as it was to long for my lathe. I used a V- Block to hold one end, and set-up a 1/2 inch drill on the other and to spin it. I used a block of wood with 80 grit then 180 grit paper to cut it down. I was lucky to have a NOS frame bracket and was able to come up with the perfect fit. This is an often over looked area when trying to fix front end shimmy. You need a good fit there. An easy way to tell if your shaft is bent is to unhook the drag linc, loosen the frame bracket and turn the steering wheel. If the bracket moves the shaft is bent. If you don't have spare shafts, a machine shop should be able to straighten your old one. The last picture is the boy bolting up the drag linc.He loves to get his hands greasy and proudly shows his Grammy as she acts shocked.







Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 10:46 am:

Dan, sometimes when a long part is not too large in diameter you could do this. Chuck up a piece of scrap, turn it to the same diameter as the work piece, bring in the steady rest and adjust it to that. Remove the tailstock, set the steady rest on the end of the lathe bed and let the long part extend out as far as it needs to. If you can do your turning close to the chuck or tailstock this will work pretty well. Good luck, Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 10:49 am:

Btw, looks like you've got a fine little helper there. Sometimes those tiny hands can go places ours can't. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 10:49 am:

I straightened mine by eye using a vice. Then I checked it by chucking it up in the lathe and letting it hang out both ends.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd, ............Red Deer, Alberta on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 11:25 am:

You better replace that cord on your drill before that young boy gets electromacuted.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 11:47 am:

Good ideas.

Looks like a good helper. My mantra for kids is "If you won't let them help when they are little and want to they won't want to help when they are big and you want them to." Applies to anything you are doing.

Let them drive whatever it is you are working on, a 10 year old can wet sand primer and do a better job than you can if she wants to be helping, a greasy kid is a happy kid, buy them tools and teach them what they are for, etc., etc.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 04:39 pm:

Ken, I had the same thought... We tend to forget that these old electric hand tools are not insulated and it's easy to get a good "kick" or Worse.

We had a fellow OC club member that was working with a drill motor outside his house and was electrocuted somehow. I sort of forgot the details but the fact is his is no longer with our here!


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