Had a Great Experience at the Ford Piquette Plant Museum

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Had a Great Experience at the Ford Piquette Plant Museum
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 12:52 pm:

Last Sunday afternoon I did some volunteer clean-up work at Piquette, along with my friend Norm and his wife. When Norm got to the museum he noticed several folks walking around the plant and looking confused. They had come from China and among other Ford history sites, had chosen to see Piquette as their very first stop. Unfortunately, the museum was closed for the winter, (except for special events/tours). That would have been a huge bummer, except we let them in anyway and gave them a personal tour of the plant. Only 2 of the 6 spoke any English so they did a lot of translation. Their level of interest was huge. They were absolutely amazed that most of the cars on display are drivable, actually get driven regularly and are mostly privately owned. Before they left they insisted that we join them in their many photos. I invited them to sit in my '21 Roadster for photos. It was truly a rewarding experience for us, and apparently for them as well. One of the non-English speaking members of the group said it best, "I'll never forget".


(Since my mentioning "Piquette" in the past has resulted in folks questioning what that means, I'll just add that the Piquette Plant is Ford's first company owned property, after moving out of the rented Mack Ave. Plant, and is the birthplace of Models F, N, R, S and a little number called the T.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 12:56 pm:

Thankyou for being such a great ambassador for the hobby and our country! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 12:58 pm:

Jerry,
Thank you for being an "Ambassador" to the group.

I must of course mention, you left off (inadvertently I'm sure) models B and K. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 12:58 pm:

Ditto that what Mark just said! Man, if I lived even within an hour of that place I'm afraid my wife would be a "Piquette widow"!! Great that you gave them the time and info.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 01:00 pm:

Good on ya!! Did any of the visitor's have trouble pronouncing Jerry Van?? Good on ya!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 01:05 pm:

Thanks guys. Gotta thank Norm too, (he's on the forum here sometimes), he let them in. I was their impromptu tour guide.

Rob,

Oops! Yes, B and certainly K as well.

Bud,

I couldn't be cruel enough to make them say VanOoteghem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Holland, Utah on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 02:13 pm:

If you get a chance please post some pictures of this historic place. I am too old to see it in person. I will never travel that far.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ross Benedict - Calgary, Alberta on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 02:21 pm:

I did the tour of the plant in October. The staff and the whole tour were worth the trip from Calgary!. I hope to return someday. Thanks to the group who saw fit the keep this going!1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 03:01 pm:

Good job Jerry and Norm, it warms the heart when you seen the commonality of people from other corners of the world. Gives one a sense of hope.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 03:21 pm:

Kevin,

Hope these help...













Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 03:25 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 03:33 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 03:52 pm:

Great job, Jerry, and great photos! Did you feel a bit like Guliver?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Partington on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 05:01 pm:

My mate John Page & I have been 3 times since 2010. Last year we took another 20 odd Aussies to see this wonderful attraction & the great effort put in by all the volunteers who have made our hobbies birthplace a must see for all. You don't need to be a T or even a Ford person to appreciate the significance of Piquette. Special thanks to Steve Shotwell who took us there the first time & to Don lacombe from the HFM who added his Knowledge to our 2 subsequent visits. All I can say is Don't fall off the perch before you visit Piquette.
Doug


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 07:31 pm:

Jerry & Norm,
A BIG THANK YOU for allowing them in and giving a tour. Museums do need down times for staff and artifacts to recover, but when something like this happens, it's always great that someone will take initiative and volunteer to do the "right thing."
Having unusual visitors stop by a odd times is more common than one would realize--I know it happened many times in my tenure as a curator. I was usually willing to open the doors and show them around, and usually one or two of the docents would also "belly up" and help. As you found, the reward of appreciation from the visitors is often overwhelming & it's great publicity for the museum, as you know the visitors will tell all their friends about the great time they had. Ya can't buy that kind of PR!
Oh, and great photos--I hope to be there someday in person.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 09:42 pm:

You da man, Jerry Van! :-)

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Holland, Utah on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 11:31 pm:

Thanks Jerry. It is much appreciated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Monday, January 11, 2016 - 11:51 pm:

Thanks Jerry, I love the photos with what I presume is number 220!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman Bolz on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 08:41 am:

Well Rob. That is John Forster's 1909 model T.
Pretty much the spokescar for Piquette. It is
one of three 1909 model Ts on display at the
museum. The car resides near the experimental
room and is flawless. Jerry has graciously adopted all polishing and cleaning on the #220. See previous
photos on the forum. It does not have a windshield.
Still looking for a K to display.
We all appreciate Jerry's many hours spent at the
museum doing maintenance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 10:50 am:

Hey Jerry and Norman,
Do ya'll still have and display the '11 barn fresh original Hupp? When I spent an entire afternoon at the Piquette plant in August of 2013, I learned a great deal by viewing and photographing that Hupp roadster because I was finishing up restoring one just like it. I never had the slant floorboards to repop and couldn't envision their dimensions so I asked the lady docent if I could remove them and take pictures. She fairly frowned at me and wordlessly walked back to the office returning a few minutes later wearing a pair of white gloves. She then asked me to remove the floorboards and she would hold the dirty, greasy, filthy but perfectly preserved boards for my picture taking. I did and fashioned perfect reproductions thanks to the "going the extra mile" educational efforts of a staff volunteer!! Soon as the wife retires this May, I'm taking her for a week at Dearborn/Detroit....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 04:09 pm:

Norm is teasing me a little bit. It was he and his wife Donna who spent/spend "many hours at the museum doing maintenance". I stopped by for a short visit, and yes, I did dust 220, but, I'm not sure about "adopting all polishing & cleaning". Meeting our new friends from China was the added bonus.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 04:12 pm:

George,

The all original Hupp may have been removed. Not sure. I believe I know the owner though so if you need any info let me know.

That volunteer was most likely Pat Linklater. Your description of her sounds perfect.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 05:43 pm:

Picture of two ladies driving by in a Model N.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 05:47 pm:

Really is a shame that other, modern building is attached to the Piquette. Wouldn't it be great to see it as a stand alone building like the photo above?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 10:59 pm:

Bill, Interesting point, but, the Studebaker addition is part of the building's history. What would be great would be to get the original power plant engine from The Henry Ford and rebuild the power house in the parking lot. That's it in the picture to the left of the plant.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Wednesday, January 13, 2016 - 09:39 am:

I'm with you Bill. I sure would like to see that addition demolished.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, January 13, 2016 - 10:14 am:

I think I once read that it's Clara Ford driving that Model N.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Wednesday, January 13, 2016 - 11:17 am:

Bill, I couldn't agree more! Piquette is such a beautiful building in so many ways...we need to be able to admire it in it's entire beauty, both inside and outside.

Steve, I read the same thing about Clara driving that car. Great picture. Somebody's watching them from the second floor corner window, and must be awfully hot in the one above it as that window is wide open!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman Bolz on Wednesday, January 13, 2016 - 07:13 pm:

Piquette Visitors


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter B. Ratledge on Wednesday, January 13, 2016 - 08:56 pm:

Steve is correct. One of the lady's is Mrs. Ford.
I believe the original photo is in the Museum at Centerville.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Wednesday, January 13, 2016 - 08:59 pm:

Another view of the plant.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 08:45 am:

I was at Piquette in '03 during the centennial. I was awed that it was so well preserved. It was a highlight of the visit. I would like to go again to take more of it in.
Just recently I had a similar experience like the visitors from China, though I did not have travel as far. You might know that there has recently been flooding around St. Louis. There is a small County owned airport in St. Charles County about twenty minutes from me. A friend of mine has a small airplane stored there. It is tied down there. It had gotten water around it and we went there to check it. Our friend hadn't got there yet but we were looking at the plane. Some one came out to see what were doing and after our explanation and we were invited into the hanger.
Wow! It is a 1939 wooden quonset hut hanger that is used by the Comemerotive Air Force.
Inside there were two WWII bombers having their annual inspections, plus period motorcycles and jeeps and other treasures. The thing I am getting at is that we had a private tour of the facility while we were waiting for our friend to arrive. I felt lucky and I am sure the is how the group from China must have felt also.
Like Bud said 'Good on you" Jerry.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 10:47 am:

Thanks Herb.

Let me add that the accessibility to 220 enjoyed by this little group was only due to the fact the owner of 220 also happened to be present, and was in fact the photographer. Otherwise, the car is roped off, with signs not to touch.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 04:11 pm:

Steve and Peter are correct about Mrs. Ford driving the car (information obtained from past forum postings) If you look closely at the second story window you will see Henry looking out at the car. There was a larger photo posted awhile back and you could see Henry clearly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nick Miller on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 04:43 pm:

At the end of 08, not to miss the special year, we went to see the Ford sights. An invitation from an employee/friend that worked at the Henry Ford allowed us to visit the Rouge (sp?), Greenfield Village and the museum. Time was short and not enough time to go thru Fairlane but we stopped just to see the grounds, all covered with snow. At the door we asked if we could take a few pics as our plane left before they opened. Before we could say good by, there was a gentleman that was kind enough to give a two man tour of the entire house, power plant and garage. That made great trip even better. It is one of the things that you want to pay forward if ever the time permits.

How would you ever have better experiences with another hobby? And it feels like you are driving in a cartoon whenever you are on the road.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 05:28 pm:

In the picture I posted above does anyone know what the sign on the side of the building says?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 05:48 pm:

Could it have been "The home of the Fordmobile"? - even though I suppose that name was more or less dropped by 1904 when the company moved in?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By arnie johansen on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 06:05 pm:

As far as removing the Studebaker building, I think that the elevator might have been moved from its original location perhaps as a result of the Studebaker addition. This would require additional modifications to get it back to orignial!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 06:49 pm:

The sign on one side probably mimic's the sign on the other side, which I believe reads "The Home of the Celebrated Ford Automobiles."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 08:13 pm:

Does the foundation also own the Studebaker addition?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 10:35 pm:

Thanks. The "H" had me stumped.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 11:50 pm:

What dates is it open to the public?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Friday, January 15, 2016 - 12:45 am:

The Piquette Plant does not own the Studebaker addition.

The large sign on the side of the building reads: "The Home of the Celebrated Ford Automobiles." It shows better in the picture posted earlier in this thread showing Clara Ford and one of the secretaries driving past the plant. I understand Clara is the passenger.

Go to Ford Piquette Avenue Plant for more detail.

schedule


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Trent Boggess on Friday, January 15, 2016 - 12:50 am:

The painted letters on the Beaubien St side of the Piquette plant in the image above read "Home of the Celebrated Ford Automobile". There are also several imagines of the opposite side (John R St) of the building that appeared in the July 1908 Ford Times. That view shows the same lettering on that side of the building as well.

Respectfully Submitted,

Trent Boggess


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, January 15, 2016 - 01:45 am:

Maybe the lettering could be painted back on that side? (If FoMoCo allows it..)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, January 16, 2016 - 06:14 pm:

Here's a new article about the museum with lots of pictures: http://www.mlive.com/news/detroit/index.ssf/2016/01/ford_piquette_ave_plant_birt hp.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Saturday, January 16, 2016 - 10:34 pm:

Roger,

Thank you. That is my 1916 touring car in the main photo of the article. The only car in the museum you can sit in. Great for taking pictures.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Friday, January 29, 2016 - 05:01 pm:

Here is a picture of the 1911 Hupmobile Runabout at the Piquette Plant taken today.

Hupmobile


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration