Roadster body build finished.

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Roadster body build finished.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 07:03 am:

Today I finished fitting the last skin to the LH door on my Duncan and Fraser roadster. I thought they were simply twisted in two dimensions. Not so.I had a go at wheeling compound curved panels and got close, but had no idea how to proceed, so off to a pro.

In this photo you can see the 2" wide twist bar used to correct mis-alignment. The frames fitted perfectly when I rebuilt them.

When the first skin was tapped around it had 3/4" twist. Once I twisted the bar correctly, the twist was corrected. I was surprised how easy it was to do. The second one was even easier.

There will be some corrective work to remove evidence of the work done to make the panels and then fit them.



These doors have concealed hinges which allow them to be lifted off the car.

Now I can get on with the preparation for painting.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 08:48 am:

Allen, Very nice looking work. Those early body builders work amazes me. All the curves to the wood and steel. I bet the wood pieces would be as hard to do (or harder) than the skin. I just made two curve pieces for my speedster projects upholster tack strip It curved, twisted and tapered in all directions. I had a wheel barrow load of scrap kindling before I was finished. Nice work, keep the pictures coming


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 08:33 pm:

Beautiful work as always Allen! That car will be a shining jewel when you are done.
Thank you for sharing the pictures.
Drive carefully and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Patterson. Moruya, NSW, OZ on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 08:51 pm:

I'm envious of the stylish bodywork on your cars Allan, especially this roadster.
My T's Steenbohms body is positively dull, style wise, when compared to other manufacturers in Australia. If memory serves me correctly, I read where Henrys inspection team said something similar (derogatory) about the Sydney manufactured bodies when they visited Australia in the 20's.
But, for 1921, it still has a sloping windshield and a one man top.

Thanks for posting and I hope you're proud of your work. You should be.
Cheers,
Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 10:25 pm:

Rob, thanks for the compliments. Don't be too hard on your car. She looks good to me. Maybe the quality of build was not as good as the Duncan Motors cars, but the design is as nice.

Duncan's were contracted to build the 1925 Dalgety cars for Ford. Perhaps the quality was taken into account when this decision was made, plus their ability to supply.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 10:41 pm:

Donnie, I steered clear of as much of the woodwork in the doors as I could. The curved hinge pillars are original, the top rail has a new piece spliced on at the latch end, and the bottom rail has new timber grafted onto the lower edge. That way I only had to re-make the two vertical timbers to which the latch is attached.

Each door has a blackwood finishing cap. I started with a 4 x 2 blank to make them. I used a bandsaw to cut the flat curve to match the top of the door, then had to mitre cut from each end to get the rough curve in the third dimension. From there it was all sanding on a linisher belt until the pieces conformed with the top of the door. In the middle of all these curves there is a twist as well. Then I could run it past the bandsaw again to get it the correct thickness. All this on some old growth timber I have had stored for years. Can't buy it any more, so I was really careful.

Good job I enjoy the woodwork.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 10:41 pm:

Rob, thanks for the compliments. Don't be too hard on your car. She looks good to me. Maybe the quality of build was not as good as the Duncan Motors cars, but the design is as nice.

Duncan's were contracted to build the 1925 Dalgety cars for Ford. Perhaps the quality was taken into account when this decision was made, plus their ability to supply.

Allan from down under.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration