'26 - '27 Wheel Lug Nuts

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: '26 - '27 Wheel Lug Nuts
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 01:52 am:

What is considered good practice in installing wheel lug nuts? A drop or two of motor oil,....a drop or two of gear lube,....a little dab of grease,....or maybe a bit of anti-seize compound? Or maybe just install them dry? Seems like when dry, over a period of time, the threads tend to rust,....especially in wet climates. Any thoughts here,....???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 03:28 am:

Just like on any car, I use some anti seize - but not much - and I don't have to reapply every time I remove the nuts on the T since it rarely sees rain and never salt.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 03:32 am:

For the roadster with wire wheels I've also bought coned washers that's supposed to spare the paint on the wheels - or perhaps compensate some for worn lug holes? https://www.modeltford.com/item/2887S.aspx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 04:10 am:

Harold, as far as I'm concerned, ANY lube is OK. If lugs are installed dry, there is no way they can tightened correctly. JMHO. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 04:19 am:

New lug nuts for wire wheels are made of stainless steel - a material notorious for its tendency to seize if not lubed whether it's being machined or if you're just mounting a nut.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, many km SW of Dearborn on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 05:20 am:

Bob's in Illinois re-tooled the lug nuts and they're plated steel. I have one of the first sets of the new batch and I'm happy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 11:09 am:

Harold I always use a small dab of Anti-Seize compound on mine :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Wetherbee - Downeast Maine on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 12:55 pm:

This will sound dumb, But I use Bees Wax - rub a stripe down each stud one time and put the nuts on to smear it around. I have never had an issue with them and it never has needed a re-application.

Roger might appreciate this - I pulled the idea from work - years ago we were having galling issues with stainless fasteners using screw guns. If you hand turned the fasteners together there were little issues, but one or two quick turns from the gun would gall the fasteners together - call it friction welding... The supplier kept trying to push some form of military grade bronze nut (at a little over a dollar each) to replace the regular nut (0.06 each) - one of the shop floor guys had Bees and brought in some wax which cured the issue - we now keep a stick of a wax based lube at each assembly area using SS bolts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 01:23 pm:

Roger, those washers were developed for the Model A folks and the reason they came into being has to do with flawed repro parts. The A lug nut is swedged into the hub, and the threads are not full depth to the shoulder. To compensate for this, the original lug nuts are counter-bored for about a 1/4" before the threads start. Some of the reproductions were not, so the nut would 'tighten" on the stud, and the wheel would still be loose. Folks just figured their wheel holes were wallowed out, so made washers that allows the nuts to tighten on the washers before bottoming on the stud threads. IMHO, this is a make-sift solution and in some ways is not as safe as the nut tightened against the wheel. My solution has been to chuck the nuts in my lathe and counter-bore them, as they should have been.
BTW, the paint will still chip with the washers!
BTW, I always use a bit of anti-seize, although I suspect the bee's wax works well too. I know, it seems counter-intuitive to put anti-seize on something you want to "lock in" on the threads, but it works! I use it on my modern cars too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ALAN FAIRCLOUGH on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 06:21 pm:

No-seize with either graphite or copper.
The grease can disappear with time but the copper or graphite is a great lubricant to make sure it will come out years later.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 08:06 pm:

In the Nuclear Power Plants I worked at, the rule was, "If a bolt or nut has fine threads or is stainless steel, you "SHALL" use anti-seize" The word "SHALL' means there are no exceptions to the rule. If that is what they wanted done in a nuclear power house, it was good enough for me. I always use anti-seize. have fun and be safe .... Donnie Brown ...


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