Model T engine in CAD

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Model T engine in CAD
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth in Alabama on Monday, January 18, 2016 - 06:52 pm:

Last semester I asked for some help with dimensions on the T engine because I was going to make one in Solid Edge for my big end of semester project. I got an A on this design and for the course. Thank you to the folks who posted responses.

You guys will be a lot more critical of what is exactly right and wrong with the model, but here was the final rendered picture. I wasn't really happy with the exhaust manifold but I only had so much time to fool with it. I learned a ton about modeling in CAD in if I had to do this project over the whole engine would be WAY more accurate. The other thing that would help is I actually have my T and spare block with me now and I didn't the whole semester I was working on this.



My professor also gave us some extra credit if we entered our project in the Siemens Student Design contest. I just received an email today saying that they liked and were impressed with my engine and they want me to make another rendered image with a cut-away view of the internals. I doubt I'll win but if by some chance I do they will put my rendered image up on the Solid Edge website and sometimes they use the images on loading screens and stuff in the actual program.

The major parts of the engine are accurate with regard to things like cam lift, piston size and stroke, journal size, etc. my model actually moves and you can push the crank handle in, then use it to spin the engine. The crank and flywheel spin and the con rods and Pistons go up and down and all of the valves rise and fall and I even got all of the timing right. The cam is a Stipe .280, lol since that's what I've got in my T. That's also a Zenith intake like mine. All of the nuts and bolts and holes are correctly sized and have fine threads. When you count every single part I made in the assembly there are over 180 parts. Anyway, it was lots of fun and I wanted to show a picture of my first finished product.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul wilcox germantown wi on Monday, January 18, 2016 - 07:07 pm:

Looks great


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth in Alabama on Monday, January 18, 2016 - 07:07 pm:

Most of the funky things you see he exhaust manifold and the back of the block where the transmission cover joins were due to time constraints. We had to have at least 25 individual parts and they only counted if they required at least 4 features. For example, I made my valves with two features, a cross-section outline of the valve revolved around a center axis, and then a hole cut through bottom of the stem for the pin. That's only 2 features so it didn't count. The block had over 40 features by itself and hogged up a lot of time to only count as 1 part towards my 25. Also, duplicate parts don't count. My 4 domed Pistons I made with 4 features but I only got credit for 1 part.

Lol, I had to kind of bust some things out towards the end pretty quickly that would count as parts, hence the intake and exhaust manifolds and the timer.

The fan blades are one of the cooler things I'm pretty proud of. To make those I made these cross sections of the fan in space and then the computer makes a solid pass through those sections to create the actual fan blade. I then made a cut to get the outline and holes for the rivets. Sill didn't count as a part towards my 25.

You can't see in this picture but the head bolts did count as a part - I made them domed and it took 5 features I think to get them correct. The only thing I was really frustrated with was the water jacket in the block and the head. There's a command that will hollow things out for you and keep the walls a specified thickness, but I had made too much of the block already. It kept trying to hollow parts all over the whole thing instead of just the upper area. Lesson learned there - timing for some features is critical, otherwise it's too late to go back and redo everything.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, January 18, 2016 - 07:32 pm:

I think your project is great and not a little fascinating. It makes me wonder how much faster Henry (the other one) would have progressed with the evolution of the Model T if he had such a tool to work with.

I see in your profile that you are a mechanical engineering student. From what I can see, you are well suited to this field or any one of a number of other related fields. Keep up the good work!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Monday, January 18, 2016 - 07:55 pm:

We used some 3D graphics back in the 90s, I guess things have come a long way since then.... Congratulations, these task are to teach you, not to get everything perfect. As a development engineer, NOTHING is perfect, EVERYTHING can be improved. It may not be cost effective but never the less, few things are perfect.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Tuesday, January 19, 2016 - 01:38 pm:

Seth, That is a great piece of modeling. The fan and crank, ratchet etc. are particularly nice. You and Martin Vowell are great assets to the hobby with your growing knowledge of computer presentation. Choosing an assembly that you knew and were interested in was a good choice. I expect to see more wonderful things here as your mastery continues.

I hated switching from manual to CAD years ago and now miss it. I hesitated to show these on your thread but thought it might give you some ideas on what you can be doing in a short while.

Respectfully Submitted.
Rich






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Tuesday, January 19, 2016 - 09:54 pm:

Too cool.
Just too cool.
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Tuesday, January 19, 2016 - 10:12 pm:

I know this was posted before, but maybe not everyone got a chance to see it...Very nice interpretation of a 26/27 engine.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FnuRW3qye-A


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Wednesday, January 20, 2016 - 08:09 am:

Seth I actually like the "Custom" intake and exhaust manifolds and may make some like them when my speedster project gets off the ground :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Wednesday, January 20, 2016 - 12:21 pm:

Part of the beauty in what Seth is learning is in being able to do Computer driven Machining and 3-D printing using metal. Eventually these things will be affordable and most any part could be produced. I am not sure what that will do to original part values but it could put more old cars on the road. The future can be both wonderful and scary at the same time.

I certainly admire Seth and his interest and abilities.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth in Alabama on Wednesday, January 20, 2016 - 12:38 pm:

Yeah, I've done enough in CAD now that I could easily whip up some completely new hubs with the necessary spacers and extension of the nose already designed in place. Just swap my drums and lug studs over and I'd be in business.

Except, I don't have access to a CNC machine (or the raw stock I'd need).

Richard one of the things I'm looking specifically to get into wherever I work after I get this degree is 3D printing with metal. I think that's going to just completely revolutionize manufacturing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth in Alabama on Wednesday, January 20, 2016 - 10:25 pm:

I made two new renders for the folks at the design contest cause the wanted to see the guts of the engine.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, January 21, 2016 - 01:42 am:

Seth, I am really amazed that the work you are doing. Back in 1988, when I was taking CAD we used a software called "Slumber J" if my memory is any good. I did very few 3D models, but I did do a complete 2D plans for the construction of a 1907 Stanley Gentleman's Speedy Roadster "Will do 60 MPH on a good road." Since the original ran on 30x3-1/2 tires, I was going to build it using Model T wheels and axles (well, actually for the front axle, just the ends, as the Stanley axle was round. It took a long time for me to do the wheels, with all the arcs in the spokes by the hubs. Wish I could find one of me small prints (the full-sized ones were for D paper) and scan it in to show you. At least the plans got me an A in the class! And the professor used my boarder design as the official Chico State U. Tech department border! But none of this hold a candle to what you've done. Great Job!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew Benoit on Thursday, January 21, 2016 - 06:32 am:

Seth, those phantom views look great.

David, Schlumberger had a CAD program in the 80s. I guess that is what you learned on. I think it wound up at UGS who also had Solid Edge.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Thursday, January 21, 2016 - 10:44 am:

Absolutely Beautiful. Keep at it.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, January 21, 2016 - 12:06 pm:

Andrew,
That's probably it, I don't recall ever seeing the name printed, just the instructor calling it that. Back then it was "Mainframe" with us at workstations. the professor figured out a way to modify your monitor's screen and would "melt" your drawing away (it was still there, but what a feeling to see your work suddenly fall to the bottom of the screen)-- The snicking from his station gave him away. He's actually a great guy and we are still in touch with each other, in fact he's helping me trim some trees on my place.


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