Stubborn Warford shift knob

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Stubborn Warford shift knob
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Nave on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 12:56 am:

Does anyone have a neat trick for removing a wicked frozen warford shift knob?
It is important not to damage the knob.
Thanks Fellers, Russ


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 06:44 am:

i just removed one that wouldn't budge. I could have heated the shaft but didn't want to burn the paint so I took an old section of a T inner tube and folded it inside itself three times, slipped it over the knob and used a pipe wrench to take it off. It didn't leave a mark on the knob, but no guarantees.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - West Melbourne Florida on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 09:59 am:

I use a 50/50 mix of cheap transmission fluid and acetone. It's always worked very well for me to loosen stuck parts. For me, It seems to work better than anything on the market today. The T block I'm building was stuck solid. In just 4 days I was able to get the old cast iron pistons to move. In just a few more days and I was able to remove the old two piece valves. The transmission fluid works as the lubricator and the acetone works as the penetrator.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 10:24 am:

Russell, I understand your concern over the knob. I haven't seen but one come up for sale in recent years. I bought it and had to buy a Warford top cover and shifter to get it. I don't know who makes the ones on the KC Warford or how close they resemble the original, or whether you could even buy just the knob from them, if you needed one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 11:11 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 03:24 pm:

The vendors used to sell a repro one, don't know how good they were are if they still do. Somewhere around here I have an original one that was in a box of T "junk" on ebay a few years ago. Apparently, no one else noticed it, I was the only bidder. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 04:58 pm:

Strap wrench?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Layden Butler on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 05:39 pm:

Best recommendation is to not take it off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Stahl on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 06:06 pm:

what does one look like?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Nave on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 07:22 pm:

Mine is just a plain round ball with a Fordolyte appearance, looks fragile.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 07:37 pm:

Russell, That is exactly what mine looks like; no shift pattern or Warford logo engraved in it. Plus the shaft and thread size is bigger than, say, an original Ruckstell shift lever (center mount). A normal shift ball off a Jeep or "Big Three" four speed truck transmission is the same thread as the Ruckstell, but not the Warford.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 08:55 pm:

Russell, I failed to mention that my knob (and I assume all others) does not have a threaded metal insert in it, so the threads are just plastic against metal. I find it unlikely that anyone had screwed the knob onto the shaft so tightly as to seize it without stripping the threads.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Nave on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 11:47 pm:

Correct, I assume the tightness is due to composite shrinkage over time.
The strap wrench sounds like a great idea, Ill buy one tomorrow.(mine are old and leather).
I tried all of the obvious methods before consulting y'all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Jesteadt - SE Florida on Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 05:57 am:

How about a blow dryer -heat the shaft and add penetrating oil when hot upside down wit shaft clamped in a vice-don"t heat it any hotter than you can grip


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Nave on Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 08:20 pm:

AND THE WINNER IS!......

john Aldrich, "strap wrench!!!"


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