Old Photo - Craig Street, Saint-Antoine

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Old Photo - Craig Street, Saint-Antoine
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 11:17 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 12:18 pm:

Looks to be a '19 Canadian Touring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 01:33 pm:

Using Google, I found a reference to Craig Street and St. Antoine Street in Montreal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 02:09 pm:

This is a fascinating photo. Look at all those wires. It would be a while before underground distribution arrived. Check out the power poles. They're soaked in creosote, some up to 6-8 feet above ground level. Only later did we learn the hazard.

Of course the touring in the foreground steals the show. Looks to be well used.

Thanks Jay!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank M. Brady on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 03:39 pm:

Wow - look at all the people dropping dead as they walk past the utility poles ... Actually, that's the building shadow that appears to be creosote. Real nice Model T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 03:48 pm:

Looking further at this car, it does not have side lamps indicating it is a starter/generator car yet it does not have demountables which once again goes against the theory some have that those options go hand in hand. Of course things could be different with Canadian cars.

Maybe Ford decided the people of Quebec should not have demountables because they're too easy to separate. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By King Martin on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 04:07 pm:

Look at all the birds...........


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By King Martin on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 04:08 pm:

Ahh never mind. I picked up my glasses. Jeez


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 06:54 pm:

I'm not too good at determining Model T "year model, and it seems like I can tell the year of the brass era cars better than the black era! All I can determine is that car in the foreground is no earlier than '17 and no later than '21. Note the Hasslers, and interestingly, that car is really pretty dirty and in that photo, looks about like one we'd find in a barn nowadays!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Shawn Hayward on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 07:18 pm:

"From 1817 to August 1976, this street was named Craig Street, after Sir James Henry Craig, Governor General of British North America and Lieutenant Governor of Lower Canada from 1807 to 1811. The street was renamed in 1976, as part of a drive in Montreal to rename streets after French figures and places."
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Antoine_Street


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Friday, January 22, 2016 - 08:12 pm:

Harold, I'll help you with black era identity. First I determine what it's not. It has unequal length windshield hinges so, not early '17. There are no side lamps meaning it's a starter/generator car which rules out '17 and '18. It has the two piece spring mount, '19 was the last year for that but, when exactly did the one piece arrive? I'm still working on that one. '19 is also the last year for the round gas tank and forged truss rods but we can't see those items.The rear of the frame would also have six holes drilled for the tire carrier whether it has one or not. All this is of course is subject to model year changeover, branch plants etc. Now when it comes to brass cars, I will come and see you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 06:06 am:

Thanks Dave,.....but as far as the brass cars, I only said I was "better" at identifying the brass cars,.....I didn't say I was particularly good at it! I'll learn though,......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 10:15 am:

Hi Henry, Creosote was used on poles here (Massachusetts) for decades. You don't have to look very far to find old poles that have been in use since the '40s. Creosote is hazardous, but I have not yet found a wood preservative that works better.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 10:31 am:

The other interesting thing is the top boot. This style was introduced in 1916 and to my knowledge was used through 1922. The slant windshield Fords were not supplied with a top boot, although an earlier one will fit, leaving a portion of the top uncovered.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 10:53 am:

not creosote that is a shadow on the pole. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 11:06 am:

My mistake. It just looked that way to me.

I worked in public schools maintenance/facilities all of my working life. For years well meaning parent groups would organize playground projects at their kids school. Often they'd use old creosote permeated railroad ties to build a perimeter around new play equipment to contain tanbark or a similar "cushion". One fine day some years ago a notice came out from the state. We spent a lot of time getting rid of the ties and replacing them with a more suitable material.


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