CARBON ON #2 & #3 PISTON?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: CARBON ON #2 & #3 PISTON?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Sherman Tacoma WA on Tuesday, January 26, 2016 - 07:37 pm:

1919 MOTOR w/STARTER, CONDITION UNKNOWN
The motor turns over with the crank. It is on an engine stand. I removed the head, no cracks that I can see and seems flat, but will check further. The #2 &#3 piston had quite a bit more carbon on top, more than the other two. What would this indicate? Further, there is almost no ridge indicating wear in the cylinders. After I clean up the top of the block, I intend to drain the crankcase of whatever is in there (I put in some kerosene over the last few months and a little oil over the last week or so), then I intend to turn it upside down, remove the pan and see what is going on there. Any suggestions on what I should look for?
Thank you--Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, January 26, 2016 - 08:22 pm:

First, buy some books like the engine manual from the club: http://modeltstore.myshopify.com/collections/all/model-t-manual

Unfortunately, the lack of ridges in the cylinders is no indication of lack of wear - the pistons goes up above the deck plane so the top piston rings reach the top of the cylinders and thus no ridges will be formed with original iron pistons. You'll have to measure how much the cylinders are worn and may have to rebore and swap for repro oversize aluminum pistons if it's too worn.

What are your plans for the engine? If it's just going in a parade car that's rarely used, then maybe just a checkup and tightening of the babbitt bearings is enough. If more use and reliability is expected, then you'll have to take *everything* apart, check for wear and cracks, balance, replace what's needed and reassemble the jewel many many $$ later ;)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, January 26, 2016 - 09:45 pm:

Is your carbon oily or dry? If it is oily, your car is burning oil and needs rings or more rarely the valve guides are extremely loose. If the carbon is dry, those two cylinders are running rich. I don't know any reason why those two cylinders should be richer than the other two since the intake for #2 is the same port as #1. likewise number 4 and 3.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, January 26, 2016 - 09:56 pm:

Carbon is normal, especially in engines that has been driven back in the old old days and not much since then - gas was kerosene mixed back in the 20's. But if there has been a water leak from the head gasket, that cylinder will be super clean. So maybe the center cylinders are just normal for an unrestored engine, while the clean ones has had minor water leaks? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Black - Dallas on Tuesday, January 26, 2016 - 10:14 pm:

Cylinders 2 and 3 run a little hotter because the water jackets are a lot smaller there. The hotter the piston crown, the more carbon deposits there will be. Take a look at the inside of the piston and you'll see a lot of carbon deposits on the bottom side of the crown from where oil was splashing up against a hot crown.


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