Factory lowered steering column

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Factory lowered steering column
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 05:32 am:

The Duncan and Fraser factory that is.



This is the lower steering bracket which bolts to the frame. The usual wedge is made of steel, which appears to be ground to shape. It even came with a correct model T type longer bolt to compensate for the thickness of the wedge.




This wooden spacer takes up the gap between the column flange and the firewall. I made this one in plywood to prevent splitting.



The yellow markings show the original holes for the column. They have been flame welded shut, none too expertly. The blue markings are for the lowered columm. The column has been off-set 7/8" to the outside and 1.5"lower. My crude guess is that the column will be about 4" lower at the wheel an be 2" further outside.

These bodies with their lower seats and body lines, really need a lowered column. Contrast this with the standard position in my 1924 Holden bodied tourer.



When I drive this car, I have to peer around the steering wheel on the outside.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 07:17 am:

What did they do with the side bolt? Putting the steering bracket at an angle also throws-off the alignment of the bolt/block through the frame. I fashioned an aluminum block spacer drilled and tapped for the offset on a speedster. Two bolts are run-in from both sides--A bolt through the frame holds the block then a bolt through the bracket and into the block holds the bracket.

Sorry, don't have a picture.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 07:20 am:

By the way, I used "billet" aluminum for the wedge and block. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 09:01 am:

Ken, the usual wooden block. The bolt is just cocked a bit and done up as usual. Crude but effective.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 09:31 am:

I only mentioned billet in case the safety police were reading. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 12:00 pm:

They make *hillside* washers for applications like that...slanted surfaces. Used on steel extrusions like channels, angles.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 01:13 pm:

Am curious.... How does this affect the seat-to-steering wheel clearance? (Considering the 6 ft.+ of us as well as hauling around our 'spare tire'!)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 05:02 pm:

Marv, the height of the seat is greatly reduced due to the low lines of the body. The front of the seat riser is barely 7" from the top of the frame rail. Most seat risers are around 6" plus all the height of the body timbers/framework below that.

At 5' 9", I am more concerned with reaching the pedals, as the seat is set back a bit, but I hope my Neville slider steering wheel will give me both gut clearance and less need to reach!

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 05:47 pm:

Just expressing my own concern with the '25 coupe. When keeping the column attached via the dash bracket, and being a closed car, will the steering wheel tip up too close to the windshield? (I recognize the advantage of gaining the extra gut clearance!) :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 10:11 pm:

Marv, you can't lower the steering column and maintain the original bracket at the dash.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Friday, February 05, 2016 - 12:20 am:

Thanks, Allan.
(Just got my bride home from the hospital, or would have inquired earlier.)
Since the original 'attaching to the dash' support is in two pieces and acting as a fulcrum, couldn't an adjustment of sorts be made? Thanks, guys.
Marv


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