OT? Lets talk trailer tires Again

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: OT? Lets talk trailer tires Again
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 03:36 pm:

I am looking to replace some old trailer tire 205/75/15 6ply.. Looking at Gladiator tires. Anybody have input on these? Thanks, Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 05:17 pm:

I would only use a ten ply tire on my trailers. Never heard of Gladiator brand.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 06:38 pm:

Dan,

E load range 10 ply ST tires can be found
at around $100 each in a 235/75/R15 at Discount Tire.


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 07:30 pm:

I've heard a lot of positive things about Kumho 205/75r 14" D range trailer radials. I'm considering replacing my Goodyear Marathons with them. Anyone out there have any experience with those tires?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 07:50 pm:

X range would be 6 ply. No good as a trailer tire in my opinion and experience.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 07:51 pm:

I meant D range.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom 30 miles N of Memphis TN on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 07:53 pm:

D range are 8 ply. E are 10.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 07:56 pm:

Ok so still no good


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry Davis Houston TX on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 08:10 pm:

What ever, avoid Carlisle tires from discount tires from discount tire co. They throw the treads and despite a "make over" they still throw. Made in China. Jerry.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim Dobbins on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 08:16 pm:

I had carlisle tires on my boat trailer and had 3 blowouts on my first trip. They are not on my list of favorites.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 08:26 pm:

What is the load range and speeds you wish to run? I think if you match the tire to your driving conditions you should be fine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 08:27 pm:

China tires ...

Nothing wrong with them as far as I am concerned.

Been running them on my trailers over (10) years.

Right now I am running Hartland trailer tires
bought at Discount Tire.

For the OP here is a link:

@ http://www.discounttire.com/dtcs/searchTrailerTiresBySize.do?fl=t&sortBy=prca&r= WASINT|pc|98370&ar=75&fqs=true&rd=15&y=13&x=42&cs=205



Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Lyon, PDX, OR. on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 08:59 pm:

According to most tire experts the main cause of blowouts is overloading or under inflated--both cause heat in the tire that will cause the tread to peel. Don.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 09:04 pm:

I have been hauling cars like early Fords on single axle trailers for over 45 years with 4ply car tires and have NEVER had a tire fail. Never a flat or blowout.
I would think 6 ply tires and dual axles would be plenty safe.
I run 4ply tires on my pickup.
I also stay below the 55MPH speed limit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 09:09 pm:

For all the bad written about Carlisle, mine went ten years ( I don't put but a couple hundred miles a year on my trailer on average.)I just replaced them last spring---forgot with what, something I bought off Ebay.

I finally had to get rid of them due to cranking between the tread--which I attributed to age and sitting on dirt. I now have the tires sitting on pressure treated 2x8's and plan on using pavers over stone to redo the area it sits in.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 09:15 pm:

Don,

In my opinion - tire blowouts usually are caused by high road surface ambient temperature + excessive speed + overload conditions + under inflation.

Tires can break down from the inside out & show great tread depth & sidewall condition on the outside.

Aaron,

Load range B tires would be 4 ply tires.

A single axle trailer should have the highest ply rated tires on it in the event of a tire blowout.

There is no second axle to compensate.


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Claverie, Memphis TN on Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 11:18 pm:

As I read this thread, I was struck by the number of folks who claimed to have tires that are many, many years old and still going strong -- and those who have had problems with new tires.

Duh!! NOTHING is made as well as it used to be.

Al I know for sure about trailer tires, is that you NEVER put automobile tires on a trailer. And especially not Radials.

Now, Kevin says he's considering Trailer Radials. Maybe, but I wouldn't.

The problem with Radials on a trailer, is they are made to flex sideways when rounding corners, in order to keep as much of the tread as possible on the road. You don't want trailer tires flexing sideways, in my opinion. A fishtailing trailer is one of the most frightening and dangerous things I have ever experienced.

$.02.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Monday, February 01, 2016 - 08:55 am:

I use nothing but 10 ply tires on my trailer. The 6 and 8 ply tires blow out long before they wear out. It's a really bad day sometimes when that happens, and it usually happens when it is raining, or hot, or in the middle of the Pennsylvania turnpike with no place to buy tires within 100 miles.

The extra $8 - $15 for a good 10 ply trailer tire is well worth it compared to the 6 or 8 ply cheapies.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Monday, February 01, 2016 - 10:27 am:

I have radials on my '16 dual axle trailer and like them a lot. I run between New York and Florida a few times a year with a full load at 70mph and have not had any issues. Maybe I have just been lucky but if you look at a trailer tire when you are backing up they sure flex a lot and I figure that radials which are designed to flex are a good thing for that. I also have sway bars and load levelers and have never had a fishtailing issue. If the trailer is properly loaded, tire pressure is correct and you have the right equipment I think radials are fine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, February 01, 2016 - 10:58 am:

Found this on-line, it may help some folks understand the importance of using a trailer tire (ST) on a trailer:

Trailer Tires vs. Passenger Vehicle Tires

(Lea en espaņol)

There are differences in the driving requirements between the tires on your trailer and those on the car or light truck you use to tow it. Therefore, there are distinct differences between the way trailer tires and tow vehicle tires are engineered.

Your tow vehicle is a leader, which means traction is a key focus in the design of its tires. Traction allows your tow vehicle to accelerate down the road, turn around the corner and brake to a stop. Another important consideration is tow vehicle tires are designed for ride comfort, which is achieved in part by allowing their sidewalls to flex.

Your trailer is a follower, which often makes tire sidewall flexing a negative. Sidewall flexing on trailers, especially those with a high center of gravity (enclosed/travel trailers) or that carry heavy loads, is a primary cause of trailer sway. Typical passenger radial tires with flexible sidewalls can accentuate trailer sway problems. The stiffer sidewalls and higher operating pressures common with Special Trailer (ST) designated tires help reduce trailer sway.

"Trailers will be more stable and pull better on tires designed specifically for trailer use. Since Special Trailer (ST) tires are constructed with heavier duty materials, they are tougher than typical passenger vehicle tires."

Also consider that Special Trailer (ST), as well as Light Truck (LT) tires are fully rated for trailer applications. This means ST- and LT-sized tires can carry the full weight rating branded on the sidewalls when used on a trailer.

However when P-metric or Euro-metric tires are used on a trailer, the load capacity branded on the sidewalls must be reduced by 9%. This means P-metric or Euro-metric tires with a maximum branded load rating of 1,874 lbs. for use on a car is only rated to carry 1,705 lbs. when used on a trailer.

Comparing the load capacities of a pair of tires of the same dimensions fitted to a single axle trailer, ST225/75R15 Load Range C-sized tires inflated to their maximum of 50 psi provide 4,300 lbs. of load capacity, where P225/75R15 Standard Load-sized tires inflated to their maximum of 35 psi would be limited to 3,410 lbs. of load capacity, a total reduction of 890 pounds.

Trailers will be more stable and pull better on tires designed specifically for trailer use. Since Special Trailer (ST) tires are constructed with heavier duty materials, they are tougher than typical passenger vehicle tires. This is a plus because trailer suspension systems are generally stiffer and less sophisticated than automotive suspension systems.

Special Trailer (ST) Tire Speed Ratings
Industry standards dictate tires with the ST designation are speed rated to 65 MPH (104 km/h) under normal inflation and load conditions.

However Goodyear Marathon and Power King Towmax STR tires featuring the ST size designation may be used at speeds between 66 and 75 mph (106 and 121 km/h) by increasing their cold inflation pressure by 10 psi (69 kPa) above the recommended pressure for the rated maximum load.

Do not exceed the wheel's maximum rated pressure. If the maximum pressure for the wheel prohibits the increase of air pressure, then maximum speed must be restricted to 65 mph (104 km/h).

The cold inflation pressure must not exceed 10 psi (69 kPa) beyond the inflation specified for the maximum load of the tire.

Increasing the inflation pressure by 10 psi (69 kPa) does not provide any additional load carrying capacity.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Monday, February 01, 2016 - 11:17 am:

Henry: Where did you find that? Please send or post link to it.

Jim: Hartland and Gladiator are made by the same folks, API Tire. However, all I saw listed under Hartland were 7:00 X 15 and 7:50 X 15 which are bias ply tires? Do you have a name of tire that you run? Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Monday, February 01, 2016 - 11:22 am:

Henry: Never mind found it at Tire rack.com. Thanks, Dan.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Monday, February 01, 2016 - 04:19 pm:

Dan,

Ironically I am sitting at a Discount Tire right now in Albuquerque, NM getting (6) new trailer tires put on.

I called ahead to make sure they had the Hartland tires I wanted but it turns out they had only Carlisle.

The Carlisle tires cost more but I don't like them.

They agreed to let me try them & change them out to Hartland if I am not satisfied.

I have come full circle - I started buying all my tires from Discount Tire over 30 years ago mainly because of their excellent road hazard warranty.

I am back with them now after getting repeated non repairable punctures in trailer tires.

Out of the (6) I bought about 2.5 months ago (1) had a non repairable puncture so that tire wa free.


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell R. on Monday, February 01, 2016 - 04:37 pm:

Trailer tires on double axle setups suffer from scuffing during turns.
Scuffing empty probably ain't all that bad so if you mainly tow light weights or rarely use your trailer, then you would hardly have any issues, but for the folks who regularly do long haul heat producing trips, they are the folks who can really test a tire brand out.
Just driving thru some gas stations can be hard work to a loaded trailer.
Fortunately, I've had all my flats and tread shedding when empty, but I am sure some of my previous loads had brought them on.


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