Sediment bulb screen

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Sediment bulb screen
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Monday, February 01, 2016 - 08:15 pm:

Did every sediment bulb have a screen? I assume they did, but I can find no evidence of one ever being in mine. No old solder, nothing. It's an all brass bulb. I took it out and apart and cleaned it and my gas tank and got a new screen for it. It fits perfect in the recessed area. I can see somebody punching a hole in it but whoever removed this one went to a lot of trouble to get it that clean never to replace it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Atchinson on Monday, February 01, 2016 - 08:30 pm:

Every one I've ever opened has had a screen. It's possible yours just got chewed up and disintegrated with age, or someone put it back together without one years ago. Definitely a must have though to prevent a gummed up carb, especially if using an original tank imo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Monday, February 01, 2016 - 08:31 pm:

The iron bulbs always had a screen inside the large brass nut. That nut has Ford script and part number.

Since you have 'brass' bulb, likely a reproduction that lacked the screen. Ford brass bulbs were last made in 1916.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Monday, February 01, 2016 - 08:33 pm:

It was a new tank 20 years ago so I had no problem and back then I didn't even know it was supposed to have a screen. I let the car sit a while and crap kept getting in the carb. I can see how that screen really needs to be there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Monday, February 01, 2016 - 08:36 pm:

Dan, If it's a reproduction it must be an old one because it looks like it's been through a lot. I bought it in 94 or 95 used. Don't know how to tell for sure repro or original.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Monday, February 01, 2016 - 08:59 pm:

Corey

An original brass bulb to 1916 will have a rather large or 'thick' tall hex area below the threads.

The iron bulbs have a rather more modern looking hex.


Brass, early

Typical iron


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Monday, February 01, 2016 - 09:36 pm:

I'll have to look at the hex part. That parts book picture shows a pipe plug in the bottom? Did some years come like that, without a petcock?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Tuesday, February 02, 2016 - 10:59 am:

I haven't ever seen a reproduction sediment bulb, and don't see a need either. There are plenty of originals around. As far as the screen itself, they were crimped in. There are two different styles of caps, early and late, and I doubt if a person could tell the difference once one is on the car, but the early caps have no markings on them, and the square part has no radius like the late ones do. Trivia I know, but thought I'd share it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Tuesday, February 02, 2016 - 09:47 pm:

If the screens were crimped in that explains why there was no old solder. I think mine is original. Either way I put the screen in, put the bulb on the clean tank and went for a drive today and it sure was nice the car not dying because of dirty gas.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Wednesday, February 03, 2016 - 10:53 am:

What can you soak the bulb in to loosen the cap in order to check the screen?

I've tried penetrating oil without success and I'm afraid I might damage the nut trying to get it off. My biggest pipe wrench isn't doing it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Wednesday, February 03, 2016 - 11:06 am:

It takes patience. I've soaked mine in carburetor cleaner, and washed them out with solvent. I've had to repeat this several times to get all the crud out using compressed air, but it is do-able.
It's hard to find one with a good screen, but sooner or later you will find one. I've had to use heat to get the cap off, and then put a new lead gasket in.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, February 03, 2016 - 11:10 am:

The only way that has worked for me has been heating the cast iron part with the oxy/acetylene torch until dull red being careful not to melt the brass parts, then letting it calm down. No problem to loosen everything then :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd, ............Red Deer, Alberta on Wednesday, February 03, 2016 - 11:22 am:

Anyone know what the # of the mesh is for the screen?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Wednesday, February 03, 2016 - 11:36 am:

>>>Anyone know what the # of the mesh is for the screen?<<<

Yeah, I've been thinking about heat. I'm a little hesitant to go after a brass thing with heat.

Hi Ken - I know this isn't your question but if you were thinking about fabricating one, the catalog sells them for a buck.



(Message edited by jesselashcraft on February 03, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Wednesday, February 03, 2016 - 12:02 pm:

Lang's sells the mesh already cut in a nice circle for the iron potato bulb and the lead seal washer for the big nut, but have used Restoration Supply Company's [www.RestorationStuff.com} brass mesh cloth # 100, its recommend for fuel screens.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Thomas - Centerville, Iowa on Wednesday, February 03, 2016 - 12:05 pm:

Not hard to install a new one. Clean the area and then with a torch, lay a thin bead of solder where the screen will touch. Then lay the screen on the solder, heat the brass, not the screen as it will melt, but heat the brass nut from underneath, and the solder will melt and the screen falls into the liquid solder. If you feel nervous about it, buy 2 screens so if you screw up the first, you got your back up plan.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Wednesday, February 03, 2016 - 12:14 pm:

If soldered properly there is no problem with the heat -- and this can be accomplished with some practice -- use a brass screen of Mesh size - 60 with a Weave type - Plain (example http://www.twpinc.com/60-mesh-copper-0075 ).

Avoid aluminum it may react with the ethanol mix.

A possible source http://www.themeshcompany.com/products/Brass.html or http://www.twpinc.com/

There are others.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Wednesday, February 03, 2016 - 12:27 pm:

I've always used a torch to put the solder on the brass plug, then use a soldering iron to re-melt the solder and press the screen down into it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Thursday, February 04, 2016 - 01:53 am:

As for removing the cap, I found an old 8 point, 1/2" drive socket the right size(don't recall what that was now)that really helped. Worked much better than an open end wrench or pipe wrench. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd, ............Red Deer, Alberta on Thursday, February 04, 2016 - 11:56 am:

" brass mesh cloth # 100, its recommend for fuel screens."

Thanks Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Monday, February 08, 2016 - 10:08 am:

>>>The only way that has worked for me has been heating the cast iron part...<<<

Thanks for the feedback everyone.

Yeah, mine's all brass so I'm probably being overly cautious with the torch.

I'll try soaking it in Larry's carburetor cleaner for a week or two and see what happens. Maybe I'm not staring at it long enough. You've got to stare at it long enough to put the Ju-Ju on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willard Revaz on Monday, February 08, 2016 - 11:28 am:

When installing a sediment bowl on each of the new gas tanks I install on each of my several T's, I poke a big hole in the screen. No clogging and any sediment gets trapped in the, guess what? Sediment bowl! I then drain it yearly. Doing this for 40 years and many miles driven, has never resulted in a gas line problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Monday, February 08, 2016 - 12:20 pm:

So....if your screen gets clogged unless you poke a hole in it, doesn't that mean whatever clogged it went on down to the carb? No thanks. I'll keep my screens intact.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Tuesday, February 09, 2016 - 02:51 am:

Me too Hal. I drain the sediment bowl now and then, and if I have trouble with the fuel flow, I just pull over and drain it again. Works for me. Poking a hole in the screen kind of defeats the whole purpose. I'd just as soon drain the sediment bulb once in awhile as take the carb apart. JMHO. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Tuesday, February 09, 2016 - 07:24 am:

The sediment bowl does two things for you. Any heavy stuff will settle out into the bottom and can be drained at the petcock. Lighter stuff that may be closer to the same specific gravity as the fuel may not settle out as easily and can stay suspended in the fuel. That is what the screen is for.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Saturday, April 02, 2016 - 10:34 am:


quote:

It takes patience...I've had to use heat to get the cap off, and then put a new lead gasket in.




Hi Larry - I submersed the bulb in Motorkote for a few weeks then applied some torch. The cap just wasn't going to budge until it did. I actually found some horse hair in there - probably from the upholstery or perhaps the ragtop pads. It's unclear to me how any gas was getting through that screen. Then I soaked it in carburetor cleaner for a couple weeks.

This is my first attempt at soldering. A humble looking job but I picked at it with my fingernail for a while and it has apparently adhered the screen sufficiently to the brass cap. Maybe I'll hit it with a file later so the next guy doesn't think I'm a hack.

So is the idea to apply a little heat to the lead gasket to get a good seat or just tighten it up cold?



(Message edited by jesselashcraft on April 02, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Saturday, April 02, 2016 - 11:08 am:

I tightened mine up cold, no leaks. Lead is pretty soft.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, April 02, 2016 - 11:49 am:

The solder job doesn't have to be pretty, just sealing the screen so stuff won't pass to the carb needle and cause grief. And as posted, the lead seal washer is placed cold.

Lapping in the brass lever shut off is good to do, makes a nice working lever and assures no weeping of gas around the shut off handle.



Do a final test that it works, plug off the fuel line opening, close the drain petcock, open the shut off lever and fill the bulb with gas. Right to the top to see the gas level. Let sit a few hours, should be no drips or leaks when in use.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Monday, April 04, 2016 - 01:32 pm:


quote:

Lapping in the brass lever shut off is good to do, makes a nice working lever and assures no weeping of gas around the shut off handle.




Hi Dan - I looked up Timesaver online and they want $72 for a pound of the powder. I suppose you use it because the gasoline doesn't dissolve the seal it makes, right? Do you think I can get it by the ounce somewhere? I would never use a whole pound.

Do you have any experience with white lithium grease?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Doolittle on Monday, April 04, 2016 - 01:44 pm:

Jesse- Timesaver is not a lubricant. It is an abrasive that mysteriously disappears by magic. It's good stuff!

https://www.modeltford.com/item/TIMESAV-Y.aspx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Monday, April 04, 2016 - 02:35 pm:

Jesse

White lithium isn't needed around the Model T. It's good for marine use I suppose.

My experience is the white stuff cakes dry if not in motion, and regular red grease for wheel bearings, and all the dope cups is best for all around use.





For around the carb, have used penetrating oil, like Kroil or Liquid Wrench on the shut offs.

Just a little squirt, and it will wick into the stem part for the times that our modern gasoline with additives and dryers products causes sticking of moving parts. When the gasoline dries inside and around the shut-off handles it causes stiff action for the handle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Tuesday, April 05, 2016 - 04:39 pm:

Thanks fellas - I guess I should have checked the catalog first.

Yeah I already got some of that Auto Kroil recommended by another mechanic.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul griesse--Granville,Ohio on Tuesday, April 05, 2016 - 04:52 pm:

"Fuel Lube" stops all leaks around your sediment bowl and works great for sealing the shut-off handle, too.This has been discussed many times on past threads---I always like SIMPLE FIXES! Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Wednesday, April 06, 2016 - 11:39 am:

Hi Paul - My late Grandmother used to cook at the dining hall at Denison University and one of her flirty student fans was the soon-to-be singer/actor John Davidson. Remember that guy?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul griesse--Granville,Ohio on Wednesday, April 06, 2016 - 01:39 pm:

Hey Jesse---Sure do! Denison has produced many "celebrities"---probably why it ranks among the top universities in endowments.---Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willard Revaz on Wednesday, April 06, 2016 - 07:50 pm:

You must note that the big way to prevent stuff from blocking your screen is a new tank. Like I said, 40 years with no screens, AND a new tank, has resulted in trouble free gas flow.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration