O t - Old Photo - Anyone Know What Make Horseless Carriage This Is?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: O t - Old Photo - Anyone Know What Make Horseless Carriage This Is?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Thursday, February 04, 2016 - 08:10 pm:

Looks pretty primitive what ever it is.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Thursday, February 04, 2016 - 08:47 pm:

Looks likes a Knight to me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Thursday, February 04, 2016 - 09:17 pm:

I couldn't tell if that was the owners name or the vehicle. Thanks Keith!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Thursday, February 04, 2016 - 09:20 pm:

Herr Knight = Mr. Knight in German

TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Kerndt-Waukon, Iowa on Thursday, February 04, 2016 - 09:26 pm:

Looks like John Steele's Speedster to me!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick J. Gunter -- Sparta, Missouri, USA on Thursday, February 04, 2016 - 09:41 pm:

Nice smooth ride with the cultivator wheels and you never have to worry about fixing flats. When you get killed in that rolling coffin, they can just bury you in it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Thursday, February 04, 2016 - 10:41 pm:

Looks like it would need to make wide turns. Not much room for front wheels to turn.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Thursday, February 04, 2016 - 11:04 pm:

Chebby prototype

:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Friday, February 05, 2016 - 12:04 pm:

It may be a homemade contraption. I see a similarity in the flywheel and radius rod area to a 1906 or so Cadillac. The differential could also be Weston-Mott that Cadillac used.

Rich




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Friday, February 05, 2016 - 12:31 pm:

How about that? Cadillac speedster!

Notched out the slab side for the crank access.

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Friday, February 05, 2016 - 12:38 pm:

One more of that area.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, February 05, 2016 - 12:51 pm:

It's amazing to me that Sears, IHC, and others were able to sell such primitive machines when the Model T was available for a similar price. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, February 05, 2016 - 12:54 pm:

I agree Mark. That rig in the photo Jay posted would be very limited at best. Imagine trying to drive up even a mild slope with it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, February 05, 2016 - 05:58 pm:

I wouldn't consider an IHC highwheeler to be primitive. I would consider them to very utilitarian and be well designed for their intended purpose and target market. Many were sold and many still survive. They were (and still are) very reliable.

I would not put a Sears in the same category as an IHC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Kramer,Woodstock,Ontario,Canada on Friday, February 05, 2016 - 06:38 pm:

I have seen this picture posted somewhere before,with the history about it.Now all I have to do is remember where.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, February 05, 2016 - 10:18 pm:

Scott K, et al, I too remember that I have seen that photo before, and some information about it, but do not remember where.

IHC came out with their Autowagon during 1907. The Sears came out more than a year later, just about when the model T debuted. Both, were cheaper than the model T Ford was when it first came out for sale. Although the model T was definitely more up-to-date, and superior in many ways, both of the other two were superior in some ways. Both were an equal or even better bargain for the first couple of years when the price difference was taken into account, along with the more rugged terrain for which they were designed.
Maybe a bit more later if I have a few minutes.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Hanson on Friday, February 05, 2016 - 10:33 pm:

For what its worth, a photo of our 1911 Sears runabout and the model I am building of it. I will say that tiller steering is not for the faint of heart...lol.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Hanson on Friday, February 05, 2016 - 10:33 pm:

(Message edited by mike hanson on February 05, 2016)

(Message edited by mike hanson on February 05, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Hanson on Friday, February 05, 2016 - 10:56 pm:

Attached is a close-up of the friction wheel, flywheel and back of the air-cooled engine in the Sears. The friction wheel uses a fiber ring when it comes into contact with the flywheel. Believe it or not, there is still a shop in Tennessee/Kentucky that makes the fiber rings.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jan brinkman jr on Friday, February 05, 2016 - 11:52 pm:

I think whoever built the body was a coffin builder full time and got commissioned to build this one .
Great pictures ! Keep them coming .
Thanks Jan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Saturday, February 06, 2016 - 12:40 pm:

Perhaps this designer was an early devotee of the Bauhaus design philosophy to become so popular in '70 Eurobox auto design. He was also able to capture the essence of the ghetto wheel still popular in some circles today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, February 06, 2016 - 12:50 pm:

John,

I want to thank you for giving me the impetus to pound Pepsi through my nose with your ghetto wheel comment !!!

You mean like this ??? Yeah, ... I see the obvious styling influences ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Saturday, February 06, 2016 - 01:16 pm:

Mr. Burger I rest my case. Thank you! It seems that the most subtle styling nuance of the old school still has its analog with modern auto design trailblazers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, February 07, 2016 - 02:33 am:

Mike H, I love that Sears of yours! I have come close to buying a Sears a couple of times years ago. I don't think that will ever happen for me. I can't complain too much however, I do have an early high wheeler.
It looks like you have the offset motor, that is the good one! My car is a one cylinder, and I am not sure who built it.
Beautiful Sears! And great work on the model!
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


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