Hold On There,... Not So Fast

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Hold On There,... Not So Fast
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Friday, February 05, 2016 - 09:12 pm:

I'm sure this must have been posted here at some point, but i don't ever recall seeing it. At any rate, a great little read that will warm your heart.

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1936/05/16/farewell-my-lovely


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, February 05, 2016 - 09:22 pm:

John,

Yes, Farewell My Lovely is a great read. And while it has been posted before, there are lots of new folks that may not have been checking the forum back when it was posted last. Or they may have just missed it.

If we can discuss what type of oil to use more than once -- I'm sure it is ok to post a link to one of the best articles about Model Ts more than once also.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Friday, February 05, 2016 - 11:04 pm:

That's what i figured Hap, some of us here have a strong case of cabin fever and would enjoy something nice to read. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, February 06, 2016 - 01:26 am:

What was E.B. White doing in Kennewick/Pasco ???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie Spokane, WA on Saturday, February 06, 2016 - 02:04 am:

Before "Andy" White wrote for the New Yorker, he and his friend (Lee Stroud, if I recall correctly) drove across the US in White's T (called Hotspur). He did odd jobs and played piano in Honky Tonks along the way to earn money for the trip. Wound up in Seattle where he wrote for the paper there for a while before moving back to Maine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Perkins / MN on Saturday, February 06, 2016 - 08:49 am:

Found mine in the local antique mall ($2.00) and read it every winter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Saturday, February 06, 2016 - 11:29 am:

The book has been reproduced, but for some reason they left out the illustrations, which is important to this book. Note the correct title.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini - Grosse Pointe, MI on Saturday, February 06, 2016 - 11:34 am:

If I remember correctly, E. B. White and Lee Stroud were the same person.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie Spokane, WA on Saturday, February 06, 2016 - 05:08 pm:

I should know better than to try to post late at night from memory.

Here are the facts:

White traveled with his friend Howard Cushman.

Lee Stroud is actually Richard L. Strout.

Lee Strout White is a portmanteau of their names, as they collaborated on Farewell To Model T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Coleman-Grand Marais MN/Detroit MI on Saturday, February 06, 2016 - 06:05 pm:

Finest prose ever written about a Model T. 40+ years later and I still get a tiny bit choked up reading it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Sunday, February 07, 2016 - 08:24 am:

That was a great read John. Thank You.

I right clicked and saved it with the authors name all saved to a Word Doc. for future reading.

I might have to look for the book though, it all looks interesting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jem Bowkett, Spalding United Kingdom on Sunday, February 07, 2016 - 10:52 am:

I have a repro, didn't know the original had illustrations, now I've got to go looking for one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Sunday, February 07, 2016 - 12:06 pm:

A connection that some people may not recognize is that E B White also wrote two of the greatest children's books of all time, Charlotte's Web and Trumpet of the Swan. In a former life, I was an Elementary teacher for several years. I read aloud to the kids every day for a few minutes after lunch from a book I chose. Near the end of the year I would have them chose the last book to be read that year. Every year but one they chose Charlotte's Web. Trumpet of the Swan is set in Montana at Red Rock Lakes - where the Trumpeter Swan spends its winters - and was and is one of the great books of all time for children overcoming challenges and understanding the heights to which one can rise above those challenges. We dissected it with discussions about the morality of Louis's father stealing a trumpet to give his mute son a voice and about the love of a father leading him to risk capture and imprisonment for his child's needs -- even tho he did not know whether Louis would be able to play the trumpet or not. I was always amazed at the depth of thought by 10 year old children and the attachment they had to their position on whether Louis' father should or should not have stolen the trumpet, etc. If E B White had never written another word, those books would still have challenged and changed the thinking of millions of children world wide and left him a legacy few others could match.

The only year the class voted for anything different was the year they voted to hear, "Mr. Howe's Tales of Eastern Montana" again. Every year at the school I taught at in Helena the Librarian had a book week contest to cover the classroom door with paper and have the class draw the cover of their favorite book on it. That year they filled the cover with drawings of Auger Fish, (who dig post holes. They grow only in the Powder River which is so thick with mud they can only move by augering their way through it. While trying to find enough water in the river to fill two five gallon buckets to soak up the bottom of some post holes we were trying to dig in the eastern Montana dirt my dad threw two of them in the back of the pickup. When we got back to where we were building fence he got out of the pickup, walked back to the back to grab the bucket of water and spit his chew of Copenhagen on the ground. One of the auger fish saw it and thought they were back at the Powder River and went spinning out of the back of the pickup, hit the ground and dug a perfect post hole. It took 7 cans of Copenhagen and we had to sharpen them twice a day but we dug all the holes for 4 miles of fence in four days.) and the other stories I told them about growing up on a ranch in eastern Montana. I wish I had actually written down the stories, I still have the cover off the door but never did write the stories down.

Every year, I told the story of Snuggles at Christmas -- the Teddy Bear my mother made from an old coat and a felt hat when I was 4 so I could have a Teddy Bear for Christmas. I would take him to school for a day and talk about being poor and how she sent a dime to get a pattern to make him etc. For the last 21 years I have told that story every year on my radio show and nearly every year I get a phone call or an email from some 40+ year old former student telling me they remember Snuggles from 5th grade.

Off to the shop.

But: If you have children or grandchildren, read Charlotte's Web and Trumpet of the Swan to them.

One more little thing. This was all 40 years ago, before they made Charlotte in to a movie. When the movie came out, I got a call from a woman who had been a little 9 year old in my 5th grade class. She told me she had taken her daughter to see the movie and Templeton sounded just like she remembered me doing him when I read to them.


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