Body solder on cast iron?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Body solder on cast iron?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, February 05, 2016 - 11:34 pm:

Can it be made to stick? I was thinking that would be a good way to balance transmission drums. I dislike the idea of removing any material from those drums, and it seems to me that adding a little weight without having to make holes would be best.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Saturday, February 06, 2016 - 12:06 am:

Steve,

It would eventually come loose. Besides, what's the melting point of body lead?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Saturday, February 06, 2016 - 12:40 am:

When you balance the brake drum, you might be able to add washers under the six bolts that hold on the backing plate. It might solve small balancing errors.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Saturday, February 06, 2016 - 01:14 am:

I make a small dressed hole (1/4") on the light side and use a cast-in-place method. The "weight" is cast in a dumbbell shape through the hole using zinc. Too late for all the details but I make them a little heavy so I can grind off the zinc overage on the final balance. I've never used more than two holes for larger weights.

I've tested the method by spinning a drum on the lathe as fast as it would go. (I stayed clear.) I think the drum would come apart before it slung a weight. Do NOT use lead. It's too soft.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Cascisa - Poulsbo, Washington on Saturday, February 06, 2016 - 05:05 am:

Build up some "Brazing Rod" on the light side. I brazed a cracked drum once (since replaced) and it worked well.

Be_Zero_Be


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Putnam, Bluffton, Ohio on Saturday, February 06, 2016 - 11:29 am:

Yes you can solder to cast iron. Every Model t connecting rod is an example. You need to use the correct "flux". Tintite is the brand, sold at McMaster Carr.

Tintite

Babbitt Paste—An integral component of casting babbitt bearings, apply a thin coat of this paste to bronze, cast iron, and steel bearing housings before casting to prevent separation.


Melting
Temp., °F Approx. Composition Approx.
Size Approx.
Wt., lbs. Each
Babbitt Paste
Not rated 40% Lead; 40% Tin; 10% Zinc Chloride; 5% Zinc Oxide 1-lb. Can 1 9006K42 $73.35

Once the metal is clean, tin it first then add weight. You can use solder or Babbitt, build up in excess which will allow you to drill away the excess to balance. No drilling is done into the cast iron drum. Drill only into the added weight. Do it on the inside of the drum, it will stay in place, no damage is done to the drum. Add you weight to the side opposite the heavy spot. If you are concerned about it being temperature sensitive you have already melted the babbitt out of you bearings by the time it melts. BTDT. IMO. Your mileage my vary.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Putnam, Bluffton, Ohio on Saturday, February 06, 2016 - 11:30 am:

Yes you can solder to cast iron. Every Model t connecting rod is an example. You need to use the correct "flux". Tintite is the brand, sold at McMaster Carr.

Tintite

Babbitt Paste—An integral component of casting babbitt bearings, apply a thin coat of this paste to bronze, cast iron, and steel bearing housings before casting to prevent separation.


Melting
Temp., °F Approx. Composition Approx.
Size Approx.
Wt., lbs. Each
Babbitt Paste
Not rated 40% Lead; 40% Tin; 10% Zinc Chloride; 5% Zinc Oxide 1-lb. Can 1 9006K42 $73.35

Once the metal is clean, tin it first then add weight. You can use solder or Babbitt, build up in excess which will allow you to drill away the excess to balance. No drilling is done into the cast iron drum. Drill only into the added weight. Do it on the inside of the drum, it will stay in place, no damage is done to the drum. Add you weight to the side opposite the heavy spot. If you are concerned about it being temperature sensitive you have already melted the babbitt out of you bearings by the time it melts. BTDT. IMO. Your mileage my vary.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Sunday, February 07, 2016 - 02:02 am:

Jack, aren't T rods and caps forged steel? Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, February 07, 2016 - 11:17 am:

The label says the TinTite is for bronze or cast iron, so I'll give it a try.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Yoder, Iowa City IA. on Sunday, February 07, 2016 - 11:57 am:

Steve, Boil the drum in strong LYE water to remove oils impregnated in the metal. That will help.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Sunday, February 07, 2016 - 02:20 pm:

Dean, won't your cleaning method damage the bushing?
TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Putnam, Bluffton, Ohio on Sunday, February 07, 2016 - 07:16 pm:

David: They tin about the same, not easily.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Sunday, February 07, 2016 - 10:28 pm:

:-) Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Yoder, Iowa City IA. on Monday, February 08, 2016 - 12:29 am:

Terry, I cleaned Robs K rods in boiling LYE water. They have brass bushings did not hurt them and tinned better than anything I have done.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, February 08, 2016 - 05:42 pm:

Dean, how strong do you mix your lye, and how long do you boil?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, February 08, 2016 - 06:06 pm:

Be sure to wear eye protection and rubber gloves with that stuff! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, February 08, 2016 - 11:34 pm:

Tintite sounds great, but I just noticed it's $73! Pass. I'll figure out something else.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Yoder, Iowa City IA. on Tuesday, February 09, 2016 - 12:25 am:

Steve mix fairly strong boil 1 hour or more.
I use Jonnson's Tin-ezy powder mixed with Zinc Chloride Home made from merutic acid & zinc jar lids.
t


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Yoder, Iowa City IA. on Tuesday, February 09, 2016 - 12:35 am:

PS making Zinc Chloride must be done out side, Have a good breeze away from anything you don't want to rust. I use a good mason jar. It produces lots of heat dissolving the zinc. I always use excess zinc always have extra in the jar.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By J and M Machine Co Inc on Tuesday, February 09, 2016 - 09:03 am:

Steve:
You don't have to drill holes in the drums or add lead.
The drums can be quickly balanced by using a die grinder and remove in areas around the web.


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