Could a blown head gasket cause this?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Could a blown head gasket cause this?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Sunday, February 07, 2016 - 07:02 pm:

A few years ago a head gasket blew at the rear of my engine, it made a chirping sound and steam came through the floorboards. I put in a composite gasket. The other day I saw water seeping there. It was running fine when I killed it. Today when I tried to start it it acted like it was going to start then then chugged like it kicked back and white smoke came from the rear of the engine. I can't tell if it was from the head gasket or manifold gasket. If it blew between 3 and 4 then could when 3 fires it blows out into 4 which would be on the exhaust stroke, spinning the motor back and that puff of smoke coming out a leaky manifold gasket and/ or head gasket? There has been a strange knock that sounded like it's been coming from the rear of the motor lately but shorting out cyls does nothing but those noises can be deceiving. I know the crankshaft and fan pulleys are loose. Any ideas?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, February 07, 2016 - 07:21 pm:

Cold cranking pressure test. Or cylinder leak down test, if you have the equipment t


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Sunday, February 07, 2016 - 07:37 pm:

I don't have anything to do those tests with. I'll mess with it more when it gets light out, it's getting cool out. If the gasket is blown that's o.k. I need some valves. I still have 7 two piece valves in there. One broke about 20 years ago and not knowing any better I only replaced one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Sunday, February 07, 2016 - 08:02 pm:

White smoke is usually water vapor. I suspect you have a blown head gasket.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Sunday, February 07, 2016 - 08:39 pm:

Using anti freeze? white smoke is water/anti. If it's really a leak a compression test will show it. easiest/cheapest.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Sunday, February 07, 2016 - 08:52 pm:

I've been running only water but had antifreeze in it before. I drained it a couple days ago so it wouldn't freeze but could have still had some water in it. I'll fill it with water and see if it disappears. Now that I think about it though it seams like I held a piece of paper to the exhaust a couple weeks ago to check for something and water droplets collected on it but I thought maybe it was because it was cold like water droplets from new car exhausts. I guess that is from condensation in the muffler.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Sunday, February 07, 2016 - 10:24 pm:

Easiest thing to do is remove the head and find out. The you'll know for sure. BTW, the composite head gaskets are not a favorite of most folks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, February 07, 2016 - 10:28 pm:

Cylinder pressure gave is $10 at Harbor Freight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Monday, February 08, 2016 - 01:36 pm:

I had a cheapie compression tester with rubber tip. It was hard to use and quickly stopped working. Last year I got the $23 (cheapie) Harbor Freight tester. It really works well on everything I've tried it on... Even the tiny motorcycle plug holes.





If you buy one of these, open it and try it right away... My first try on this one was bad... They swapped it for another, no questions. My HF is over an hour drive away, if I were to buy one now I would go to the car in the parking lot and test it before driving away.

If you get a good one it should last a long time. The quality is good, but the quality control isn't.

TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Monday, February 08, 2016 - 03:39 pm:

The kit is a good start, but I found the rubber tip was not useful when cranking by myself. It kept falling out. So, I got one of the sparkplug adapters available from the vendors

plug adapter

to adapt the 1/2" NPT thread in the cylinder head to 4mm metric thread on the compression tester kit hose.

The kit from Harbor Freight comes with a 0 to 300 PSI gauge. I found that not good, because Model T compression is more in the 40 to 70 PSI range. I bought a 0 to 100 PSI gauge from Graingers (lots of other places have them).

Now that I had a good, usable gauge setup, I discovered my Model T does not hold pressure very long. You need someone to read the gauge while you crank or vice-versa.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Mullins Spokane Wa. on Monday, February 08, 2016 - 05:35 pm:

Remove radiator cap have someone crank it over watch for bubbles in radiator.Another remove spark plugs crank over watch for water out spark holes.Next as indicated above remove head. No special tools required.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Monday, February 08, 2016 - 10:42 pm:

Thomas, a proper compression gauge has a check valve. It does not loose a reading even if your compression is bad or your valves leak. It will always show the maximum pressure reached and will hold that until you release the pressure with the little Schrader valve button.

That is something you should check on the gauge when you test it before leaving the store!

TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, February 09, 2016 - 08:56 am:

Terry,

Holding the pressure is not the issue. It's holding the tester against the plug hole while also cranking the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Tuesday, February 09, 2016 - 09:39 am:

Actually, you can do a rough compression test without a compression gauge. Just crank the engine over with the ignition off. The resistance should be just about equal every time a piston comes up on a compression stroke. You can do this either with the crank or the starter. Note: If you think that H20 is getting into a cylinder, crank it over with the spark plugs removed first. A hydraulic lock can break something expensive if you are using the starter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Tuesday, February 09, 2016 - 02:45 pm:

A set of corks is a good poor man's compression test.

Just place one in each cylinder and see how high they pop when cranking the engine over.

Ensure there is no florescent light above the engine or you may have a real mess to clean up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, February 09, 2016 - 03:43 pm:

I realize Cory might have other things to do in life but, in the 2 days since this was posted, the head could have been removed and the problem found. (again, not meant to pick on Cry)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, February 09, 2016 - 03:43 pm:

Oops, "Corey". Sorry.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Tuesday, February 09, 2016 - 09:29 pm:

Jerry, that is why I got that tester. The four fittings on the right are for various spark plug holes. The rubber tipped fittings are there just to fill the otherwise empty spots in the packaging, they have no known real use except I'm thinking of fitting them to my blow gun which always looses it's rubber tip.

I run metric plugs on my T so there is a fitting for that. I always get 3/4" MPT (X 1/4" FPT I think) reducers and then drill out the center and run the correct metric thread tap. That way a full set of spark plug reducers come in below $10. In the same way you can make one spark plug adapter to run your gauge... whatever gauge you have.

TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Tuesday, February 09, 2016 - 09:50 pm:

I think it might be a valve train problem after what it did today (I posted that somewhere). When I have more time I'll fool with it some more. I need to replace the 2 pc valves when I have it apart.


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