Old Photo - It Ain't Much To Look At, But By God It Runs!

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Old Photo - It Ain't Much To Look At, But By God It Runs!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 09:45 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 10:12 am:

Once again, Jay, thanks for a great picture. If I owned that car I wouldn't change a thing. Well maybe drive a nail somewhere to hang my bucket on. I suspect that one of the few things more fun than driving a T Model might be driving a piece of one. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 10:22 am:

Is it a Canadian car? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Plank - Three Way, TN on Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 11:19 am:

No radiator neck, leaking cowl lamp, and does it have a wishbone brace?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 11:21 am:

Dennis, I think your right on the accessory wishbone brace.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Dugger on Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 11:25 am:

Jay; I wonder if the guy is wearing a suit, white shirt and neck tie?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 11:34 am:

A formal portrait; he removed his cap and placed it on the steering wheel.

Is it moving day or trash day? Is that a clothes line tied to the rear of the frame?

Robert, yes, having a car such as that would be a hoot!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 11:55 am:

Awesome car! I built my 1915 from three piles of parts I scrounged up. Whatever color or condition it was in when I found it is the way it went together! Well, I did rebuilt the rear end and replaced the drive-line bearings.
Threw a lawnmower battery in there to power the lights, a brake switch and away I went. Has a stock March 6th 1915 engine in it that was rebuilt and then thrown in a corner for 20 years when I got it. The wooden box on the back end rattled around with one of the local T "Guru's" for lord knows how many years and he finally parted with it.

Of the three T's here at the house the 1915 is the most popular and is slated to be used in a wedding at the ocean beach this coming July.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 01:02 pm:

I'll take a "character" vehicle ANY DAY over some over-restored trailer queen show car.

This thing is awesome. Your's is too, John. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Sorenson-Montrose,CO on Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 02:47 pm:

I remember Al Vivian (RIP) telling a guy that showed up at a T get together with a TT that had less parts on it then that....
"If you had one less part on that truck we'd hafta kick you outa the Club".......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 07:12 pm:

Sure looks to be Canadian due to the drivers door. Over axle wishbone, non demountable wheels, oil lamps, no dash and especially equal length windshield hinges all point to an early '17. Interesting is the horn button on top of the column, just like the American cars. We have all seen the Canadian button in the center of the steering wheel on '19?, '20 and '21 cars at least. Was '17 different? What about '18? This is the kind of photo we need to see.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James M. Riedy, Sandusky, Ohio on Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 07:25 pm:

I see no tube stem on the front wheel but it does look as if there might one sticking out from the side where the tire meets the rim near the bottom. Is this possible? Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 07:52 pm:

James, I think I see the tube stem right at the top of the wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, February 12, 2016 - 09:38 am:

The tube stem is at the top like Dave says, but it is at an angle, he's about to shear the stem off if he isn't careful. :-)

pic


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Friday, February 12, 2016 - 09:50 am:

That is the most beautiful T I have ever seen.

It violates almost every safety rule known to man (or woman for the PC crowd) but it should easy to work on! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James M. Riedy, Sandusky, Ohio on Friday, February 12, 2016 - 10:01 am:

OK I see it now very well camouflaged. Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, February 12, 2016 - 04:35 pm:

I did see a model T wheel and tire with no valve stem one time, at a swap meet years ago. The valve stem had been removed, holes drilled in the rim. The tire was filled with concrete cement.
It had been driven on that way. The fellow had found it in a barn and took it to the swap meet just to show it off!
Drive carefully, and do enjoy! W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, February 12, 2016 - 07:34 pm:

Wayne,

Our 1907 S Runabout did not have any valve stems or tubes in the rear tires when my Dad purchased it back in the 1950s. Instead the tires were filled with cotton seeds. It was mostly a static display car when Dad purchased it so I don’t know if they drove it much that way or not. The seeds were not all ground up, which is what I think would have happened if it had been driven a lot with just the seeds in the tires. But I don’t know for sure if they would or would not have been ground up.

Dave,

If the photo was taken in North America rather than Europe, it is most likely a Canadian car (assuming the remaining parts came on the car). Note Ford of Canada continued mounting the horn button on top of the steering wheel at least into 1919. Gordon Sylvester has an unrestored 1919 original Canadian touring that still has the horn button mounted on top of the steering column and the push pull light switch to the right of the coil box. (Ref the “Model T Times” Mar-Apr 2005 page 25-27) It also has the straight windshield with the later unequal length hinges. I do NOT know when Ford of Canada discontinued the equal length windshield hinges. And of course there would have been some overlap when both styles were used. Note that Vic Patterson’s 1920 Canadian touring had the sloping windshield, one man top, and the horn button now located on top of the steering wheel. Some photos of Vic’s car are located at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/299440.html and scroll way down to the entry “By Vic Patterson. Grande Cache, Canada. on Monday, July 16, 2012 - 11:33 pm.” [Disclaimer – I do not know what the serial numbers of the either of those cars are. And even with a serial number it has been reported that Ford of Canada produced engines during the winter to keep people employed and used the engines later when sales increased again with the warmer weather. “IF” that did happen, then the engine numbers would not be as accurate for providing an approximate date on a Canadian car.

Note the English Fords also had an opening left front door (they had a dummy right front door until Oct 1918 and then they like Canada had working front doors on both sides of the body (ref page 229 "The English Model T Ford" book).

But the English Fords sold in England would have been RHD until Sep 1919 when they switched to Left Hand Drive because of the generator/steering gear interference. But I don't know if Ford of England bodies were used somewhere else in Europe in the 1917-1922 time frame. We know Ford of England supplied chassis parts and body parts that were used to assemble the 1924 and later Model Ts in several locations. But I don’t recal reading one way or the other about the 1917-1922 time frame. If anyone has information on that, please let us know.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Friday, February 12, 2016 - 08:09 pm:

Jay cool pic.I would drive that model T. We don't have many model T s or A s in our area. Last summer we went somewhere in a model A almost every weekend and never saw another on the road. We saw some in trailers at shows. We drive the restored A coupe a lot and a un restored 29 sedan and people like the unrestored sedan as much as the restored coupe. I say drive them life is short. Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, February 13, 2016 - 02:26 am:

Thank you, Hap. That is interesting to say the least.


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