Help needed on 26 Tudor body panel

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Help needed on 26 Tudor body panel
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rand Ward Payson, Ut. on Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 11:47 pm:

Can anyone help me with removing the lower center panel on my Tudor? There are a bunch of rust holes on the bottom center panel. I have removed the entire rear panel and ground off all the rivets holding on the upper and lower panels but they won't seperate. What's the trick? Thanks for your help.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rand Ward Payson, Ut. on Friday, February 12, 2016 - 09:38 am:

I have a new lower panel ordered but need advice in separating the upper and lower panels. How do they separate? Thanks, Rand


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rand Ward Payson, Ut. on Friday, February 12, 2016 - 09:50 am:

Anyone out there that has had any experience with separating panels?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rand Ward Payson, Ut. on Friday, February 12, 2016 - 11:27 am:

Anyone, Anyone?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, February 12, 2016 - 03:32 pm:

Patience Rand, someone out there has done this. I haven't! I think my panel is in good condition, though I haven't looked at it closely yet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, February 12, 2016 - 03:46 pm:

Rand, I have never done this on a T, let alone a 1916-7 Tudor. On many cars, panels are joined by spot welding. If the panel you are working on is welded in this way, there will be a series of spot welds along the seam. They will appear as small depressions in the metal. Panel shops part these panels using a tool like a very small hole saw.

The depressions are first hit with a centre paunch and then the hole saw is used to cut through one of the panels, without going right through. If this is done from the inside, the hole left in the panel is used to weld through when refitting the panels together, after the piece left by the hole saw is ground off the other panel.

This may or may not be the case for you. If it is it might best be a job for someone who is experienced in the job.

This may help.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rand Ward Payson, Ut. on Saturday, February 13, 2016 - 12:01 pm:

Here's a pic of the inside where I'm trying to separate the upper from the lower. Any help would be appreciated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, February 13, 2016 - 05:42 pm:

Rand if you can get to the backside or underside of the panel use a wire brush or wire wheel brush on a drill and clean the inside of the seam. If its been spot welded you should just begin to see the indent of the spot weld.

My 21 Touring had a bad rear panel and it was spot welded this way. Not sure about your car but I bet its done in a similar way.

I used a 5/16 drill bit and carefully drilled in the spot weld JUST ENOUGH to carefully go through the spot weld. IT WONT TAKE MUCH!

Once you have a few of the welds drilled out in row, carefully use a thin bladed screwdriver or something similar and you should begin to separate the panel from the one you want to remove.

This worked on my 21 Touring and maybe this will work for you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, February 13, 2016 - 06:00 pm:

There are special bits for drilling out spot welds, here are two types:

http://www.eastwood.com/spotweld-cutter-pro-kit-3-8-and-1-2-inch.html

http://www.eastwood.com/ew-3-8in-double-ended-spot-weld-cutter.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, February 13, 2016 - 10:47 pm:

Mark, the second cutter you listed is the type I was referring to in my post above.

That one you show first may make the job a little quicker when separating the panels. I have never seen one quite like that.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Sunday, February 14, 2016 - 09:23 am:

You can use a common drill bit thats close to the size of the spot welded area you want to drill out and make your own.
If your steady enough you can grind a bit that will be like the ones that Eastwood sells on a bench grinder. It takes a little practice but you can learn to do it.

I sharpen my own bits. I learned to do it in a machine shop class many years ago.

The bit that Eastwood sells is probably pretty good but the price should be closer to $10-15 dollars. MHO


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rand Ward Payson, Ut. on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 06:09 pm:

Thanks for your responses. I used the information you gave me, drilled out all the spots wields (I didn't know they were there to begin with...THANKS) and have it all separated. It works beautifully and I didn't even have to drill through both panels. Thanks again, Rand


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