How do you dress your coil points

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: How do you dress your coil points
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, February 15, 2016 - 03:16 pm:

Sitting here watching an old movie with a box of old points next to the "comfortable" chair. Resurrecting old points to trade out when the points on my car get tatty is a nice mindless indoor activity.

Just curious how others renew their pitted points.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry Brancato, Burbank CA on Monday, February 15, 2016 - 03:29 pm:

What's the old movie?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, February 15, 2016 - 03:34 pm:

George Washington Slept Here ... 1942 ..w/ Jack Benny and Ann Sheridan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, February 15, 2016 - 03:56 pm:

Barbie Doll Clothes usually fit them. . . .
Seriously, I use about 12000 Grit Wet or Dry, wet to do them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Monday, February 15, 2016 - 04:04 pm:

David, How about a pair of "Hot Points", err, Hot Pants shorts from the seventies?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, February 15, 2016 - 04:21 pm:

I use a fine point file first to get down to where I don't see any more pitting .. then switch to wet 1000 emery paper. Hardest part is the upper point with the brass spring cushion. So often the rivet is pushed in .. making it hard to reestablish the gap.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Monday, February 15, 2016 - 05:06 pm:

A fine stone about 3/4" diameter and 0.2" thick in a Dremel. I use the flat face.
The points rapidly blunt a metal file.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Monday, February 15, 2016 - 05:07 pm:

A fine stone about 3/4" diameter and 0.2" thick in a Dremel. I use the flat face.
The points rapidly blunt a metal file.
You'll have to do it during the ads because of the noise


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Monday, February 15, 2016 - 05:16 pm:

Mark
Can you elaborate on the last two sentences of your most recent post?
I don't understand?
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, February 15, 2016 - 06:03 pm:

Ron,

Ok. The upper point assembly which has the thin brass spring underneath holding the point is illustrated in the model T shop manual as having a .005 gap. When you find these "in the wild" at flea markets that gap is often closed due the the rivet being pushed in from mishandling. Just wondering if anyone has replaced that rivet to allow this gap to be adjusted back to spec.

Would save a lot of those upper points from being tossed. The bottom steel point assembly is less fragile and easy to clean and adjust.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Monday, February 15, 2016 - 07:19 pm:

Fine oil stone.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, February 15, 2016 - 07:49 pm:

I have been known to slip a single edge razor blade under the point's "finger" to hold it stationary while dressing the point. Be careful, you don't want to muck up the that "cushion" adjustment (if it isn't already mucked up).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Yoder, Iowa City IA. on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 12:10 am:

Better than points file.
pf


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 12:29 am:

I have been doing mine on the coil to try and keep the contact more or less parallel to each other.

Dean, bet those work a lot better then the points file that I have been using.

I would think that getting the points flat and parallel to each other when closed would be more important then getting the pits out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 01:31 am:

Maybe I missed the point, but from what I've been given to understand, the nature of alternating current is such that even as the hint of a beginning of a "weld" is being formed on your coil's points by current moving in one direction, it is removed when the current switches polarity and moves in the opposite direction. _In other words, if you operate on the magneto, you will be a whole lot less likely to find yourself in need of dressing your points than if you operate for prolonged periods on battery, which, of course, is direct current in a single direction.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 02:58 am:

Dean, where did you find those? Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 08:22 am:

David...try Amazon. http://www.amazon.com/EZE-LAP-PAK-Color-Coded-Diamond/dp/B000UVS62S


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 10:55 am:

Bob,

Been crank starting mine with a little help from small wet cell battery under the seat ... and then driving on magneto for about thirty years.

The points generally have pits in them after a year of driving. When the engine starts to miss at higher speeds or when it doesn't start on the first or second crank in normal weather I know it's time to clean up the points, the timer and the plugs. Just part of my regular seasonal maintenance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 11:15 am:

So, I assume the coil needs to be re-adjusted after dressing the points?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 11:50 am:

My Op is no. You are only "CLEANING" off any oxidation or crud and the small amount of material should not really change anything. But you can if it make you happy! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 01:09 pm:

As most Ts run fine with the timing lever left about halfway down, the coil will always fire with the same polarity pulse from the magneto. It will be the opposite way when starting with the lever up, and at low speed you may get a second 'fire' of the opposite polarity before the timer moves on, but, as I understand it, the coil works with one predominant polarity of pulse, not real AC.
From testing I did some years ago, if cleaning the points involves removing and replacing either or both, it is definitely best to set them up with an HCCT, Strobospark or ECCT. You cannot be sure it's generating single sparks otherwise, though the coil may seem OK.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 01:25 pm:

A little thread drift here, but related - just how rugged are these coils and their adjustment over time? I assume most folks carry a spare coil, do you just toss it into the toolbox and let it bump around, or do you protect the top of the box to keep things from bumping into the points?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 04:15 pm:

LOL ... I wonder how many T drivers in the teens and twenties / thirties tested their coils at the dealers. I'm
assuming they did what most of us do; clean the side contacts, file or use a stone on the points .. and pry or whack the reset points until all the cylinders seem to fire "about right."

I would love to test my coils from time to time just to see how screwed up I've made them. Wish I had that spiffy digital electric tester, but it's pretty expensive. Anyone in the Rochester, NY area have one to lend for an afternoon?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 04:34 pm:

I concluded, after rebuilding about 50 coils that, with experience and an understanding of how they work, and if you take care setting the cushion spring gap and tension, and adjusting only on a simple buzz box powered by a 6v or 12v battery, then about 85% will subsequently prove to be OK on the proper tester.
But that means that your chances of getting all 4 right are only 52%. The other coils will probably work reliably, but you miss out on that extra smooth even running.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn - Lincoln, NE on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 05:01 pm:

It does not take much to change the tension on either the upper or lower points. Just bumping the points can change the adjustment. Changing the tension on the upper points can cause the points to hang up a little thus causing a double spark and can also change the amperage. Changing the tension on the lower points will change amperage either lower or higher depending on the tension being increased or decreased. I would take care in storing a spare coil so that the points are not being banged around. I also do not handle the coils by the points when inserting or removing them to or from the coil box.


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