A little O.T. but definitely of interest to David Dewey!

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: A little O.T. but definitely of interest to David Dewey!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 02:14 pm:

Hi all, especially you David Dewey! You might be interested in this article about the 1856 Steamboat Arabia. This article was sent to me by one of my T friends. Thought of you immediately!http://www.wimp.com/cargo-perfectly-preserved-in-hundred-fifty-year-old-sunken-s teamboat/?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=story/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 04:50 pm:

That is absolutely incredible! I really want to visit the museum now. Thank you for sharing.

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 05:21 pm:

That is an amazing story and great pictures too. I think it was funny how the farmer gave them permission to dig as long as they had the field put back in time for spring planting. Looking at the size of that hole those fellas had to work fast to get the merchandise out of there and the hole filled before spring planting season


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Trent Boggess on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 05:36 pm:

The story of the loss and recovery of "The Great White Arabia" is covered in the finder's book "Treasure in a Cornfield".

If you are ever in Kansas City, you should reserve 2-3 hours to visit The Steamboat Arabia Museum. It is very well done, and the artifacts recovered from the wreck are considered to be the largest collection of antebellum artifacts in America. The museum as a whole is incredible.

Respectfully submitted,

Trent Boggess


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 06:12 pm:

HI Tim,
Thanks! Yes, I am well aware of the Arabia--an amazing story, and no, they did not finish up in time for spring planting!There are a few California boats out here waiting to be found too, but that kind of preservation takes money, and no one seems that interested.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 09:18 pm:

They had a show on PBS about it, a
fantastic amount of things were found!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 10:05 pm:

Mark, you wouldn't happen to know what the name of the program was, would you?

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, February 17, 2016 - 03:58 am:

I have always been fascinated by the story of the Arabia ever since I heard about it in the early '80's. We finally got to see it in the early 2000's. It is absolutely unbelievable what was recovered. The story of what those people went through to recover it is also unbelievable. Not only did they have to raise the money to do it, they got all kinds of flak from the "scientific community" because they were going about it all "wrong". They got absolutely no help from them, just, condemnation. They also did it all through the winter months. There is a book, outstanding by the way, that describes what all they went through. If anyone goes anywhere near the museum, it is a MUST see, as far as I am concerned. The whole story is fantastic!!!!.
We have a buried steamboat near here also, but it was empty when sunk, so there isn't much interest in recovering it. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Wednesday, February 17, 2016 - 09:37 am:

A fascinating story!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Wednesday, February 17, 2016 - 11:04 am:

Did they save the engines? In the one photo they looked very intact.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David A. Siver.......De Smet, SD on Wednesday, February 17, 2016 - 02:38 pm:

Here is another steamboat that was sunk on a snag on the Missouri River near De Soto, Nebraska. Was excavated, cargo recovered and on display at the wild life refuge.

www.google.com/search?q=steamboat+bertrand&newwindow=1&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=uni v&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwju2dGXxf_KAhWJNT4KHZSMD3MQsAQIMw&biw=1153&bih=633


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Wednesday, February 17, 2016 - 03:00 pm:

I saw the Arabia when I went to the MTFCI meeting in the late 90's. Some of stuff was preserved so well by the mud, a roll of silk cloth was one that I remember best. A tub full of knives, forks and spoons. They also found a carpenters tool box on the deck. I wonder what happend to the guy, he probably was destitute without the tools of his trade....

(Message edited by Tony_bowker on February 17, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, February 17, 2016 - 03:28 pm:

Mark Twain spoke about going through high water cuts in "Life on the Mississippi". There was always the chance of getting stuck and usually no room for turning around either. Guess you needed some pair to do it on the first place. I'll bet the pilot passed off the decision to the owner who was usually aboard. Saw that TV special too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, February 17, 2016 - 11:03 pm:

the river wanders over the years, not so much anymore as we interfere. When the Arabia sank, she was in the main channel, which is now about a mile or so away!


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