5TH GRADER QUESTIONS FOR 2-18-16

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: 5TH GRADER QUESTIONS FOR 2-18-16
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Batta - Dayton, Ohio on Wednesday, February 17, 2016 - 11:13 pm:

Hi guys,

I have been asked to answer a number of questions for 5th graders tomorrow about the Henry Ford and the Model T. I would like some feedback and assistance with a few of them. Feel free to simply reply with the number of the question and any commentary you want to give or links to other articles where it may have been previously discussed.

1. What would a Model T cost today due to the rate of inflation?

2. How many Model T's do think are still around today?

3. Who helped Henry Ford build the Model T?

4. How many different styles of the Model T were there?

5. What motivated Henry Ford to make the Model T?

6. What Materials were used to make the Model T?

7. Who or what inspired Henry Ford to make the Quadricycle?

8. What were the prices/ cost of the Model T?

9. From start to Finish how long did it take to make a Model T? Before assembly line and after?

10. How many prototypes (tries) before he made the first Model T?

11. Did Ford make any kind of Battery operated machines?

12.How did Henry Ford get the design for the model T?

13. Who were Henry Fords Biggest supporters when he first started?

14. What Interesting tools were used to make the Model T?

15. How many Miles could a model T go on 1 tank of Gas?

16. What were some of the flaws of the model T?

17. Why did they use bike wheels on the first model T?

I am sure some of these may seem like simple, silly or odd questions, but they are 5th graders. You help would be appreciated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Wednesday, February 17, 2016 - 11:27 pm:

Tomorrow?!? Why does this bring back all sorts of bad memories of doing book reports the night before they're due!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marshall V. Daut on Wednesday, February 17, 2016 - 11:35 pm:

If you don't finish this homework assignment in time for class tomorrow, just tell the teacher your dog ate it! :-) 'Always worked for me.

Marshall


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 12:02 am:

1 about 40 times the price $12,000 to $18,000
2. 100,000
3. Glamb, Sorenson Cuzzons
4. Over the 19 years about 30 bodies
5, To make money for Henry Ford
6. Initially Vadniaum(?) Steel
7 Saw pictures from a exposition in Chicago
8 Initially $850 dropping to $235 in 1923
9 Initially a couple of days, after production line about 30 minutes
10 He many many other cars before the T about 25,000 from Model A thru Model S. Only one prototype is known to have been completed and driven.
11 Not that I know.
12 from his mind with full sized drawing on a wall.
13 Malcolmson(?), a local coal merchant
14 Huge presses, up to 30 feet tall.
15. about 18 to 20 on the flat, less on hills.
16. Only two speeds and poor brakes by modern standards.
17. Bicycles were very common and bike wheels were cheaply available.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Batta - Dayton, Ohio on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 12:08 am:

:-). I have the other 60 questions already taken care of. This is part of a history, STEM, and language arts class. This portion is to show the different resources that are available for students to use. It could be the use of hardback books, Vintage Ford, Glen Chafin guides, Model T Encyclopedia, the Forum and knowledgeable friends to help find the answers you are looking for. No matter the topic you are researching.

Phase 2 of this project will be to visit the school before the year is out with as many T's as I can get there. If you are near Dayton, OH and interested, let me know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marshall V. Daut on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 12:32 am:

Scott -
Among the other good pieces of information you have received so far, please be sure to tell these 5th graders that Henry Ford did NOT invent the automobile! My stupid 2nd grade teacher in the 1950's told us that he did, and it took YEARS for me to disabuse myself of that notion. You'd be surprised how many people will answer "Henry Ford" if you ask them: "Who invented the automobile?" 'Think I'm kidding? Just ask a few people this question at your workplace and you may be surprised at their answer(s).
Marshall


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marshall V. Daut on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 12:37 am:

P.S. This 2nd grade teacher of mine was also the one who taught is that New York City was the capital of New York State. Jeez, did that old bat scr*w up a lot of us kids with her misinformation! I still have to think twice even now when I mentally run through the capitals of the states and I come to New York. Thanks a whole bunch, Miss Shaw, wherever you are.
Marshall


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marshall V. Daut on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 12:38 am:

OOPS! "...taught US..."
M.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 12:40 am:

1.) At the time of Model T production, most American workers were earning between $4 and $6 per day.

2.) According to some reports, out of at least 15-million Model T Fords produced, 250,000 survive worldwide in various states of condition. In the United States, there may be 60,000, most of which are still on the road or at least intact.

3.) "Henry's Lieutenants" included gentlemen like Josef Galamb, Edward "Spider" Huff, Charles E. Sorensen, C. Harold Wills, John W. Wandersee and James Couzens.

4.) At different times during its 18 year production, the Model T was available with a number of bodies including a 5-seat Touring, 2-seat Torpedo, 2-seat Roadster, Tudor, Taxi, truck and a few others.

5.) Henry Ford was a complicated man driven by passions that drove him to almost incomprehensible levels of wealth, influence and power. There's no short answer that encompasses all his motivations, but if you were to ask the man himself, he'd probably say that his basic intent was to mass-produce and market a simple, inexpensive car of good quality to people of modest income. He said, "I will build a car for the great multitude. It will be large enough for the family, but small enough for the individual to run and care for. It will be constructed of the best materials, by the best men to be hired, after the simplest designs that modern engineering can devise. But it will be so low in price that no man making a good salary will be unable to own one..."

6.) The Model T was made mostly of conventional materials including mild steel, aluminum, cast-iron, wood, brass, leather and so forth. The most exotic material used was vanadium steel, which, for its weight, had excellent durability and shock-absorbing characteristics. High-stress components in the Model T (such as the crankshaft, front axle and steering components) were made of this material.

7.) The Quadricycle was Henry Ford's very first automobile design and though legend has it that his original inspiration was a very early steam-powered tractor, he was, no doubt, also inspired by any number of other self-propelled, road-going machines of his age.

8.) The price of a Model T gradually decreased from a high of about $1,000 in 1909 to a low of about $280 by the mid 1920s.

9.) Originally, most of the parts of a Model T were produced by various sub-contractors and these components were assembled at Ford's factory. At that point, each car took about a half-day to put together. At the peak of Ford's mass production, at which point the company was creating most of the parts and sub-assemblies, a car could be built in ninety-three minutes.

10.) A number of successful and semi-successful Ford designs went into production and were marketed prior to Model T, including Models A, B, C, F, N, R, S and K. At that point, most car manufacturers went with letters or numbers rather than names like Taurus, Mustang, Escape, Focus, etc.

11.) Ford made all kinds of machinery including airplanes, boats and tractors, but none that I know of were primarily battery-powered.

12.) The Model T was designed in a secret room to which only Ford's most trusted designers had access and the car was a team effort.

13.) Ford's original investors included Alexander Y. Malcomson, John S. Gray, John W. Anderson, Horace H. Rackham, Charles H. Bennett, John F. Dodge and his brother, Horace E. Dodge, Vernon, C. Fry, Charles J. Woodall, James Couzens and Albert Strelow.

14.) One of the most interesting tools in the factory was a machine that drilled and bored the many necessary holes in an engine block all at the same time. Another cute tool was a machine that painted wooden wheels by dipping them in a vat and then spun the wheels at high speed so that centrifugal force removed the excess paint.

15.) Most Model T Fords held ten gallons of gasoline and got decent mileage of about fifteen miles per gallon, so if you were to run a tank absolutely dry, the car had a theoretical range of about 150 miles.

16.) Like most cars of its era, the Model T had very poor braking ability. For the sake of simplicity and expense, the Model T had only two forward gears, low and high, but it really did need an intermediate gear, especially for hills.

17.) Because of the truly awful roads that existed at the time of the Model T, nobody was driving at the kind of high speeds which would require today's steel-belted radials. In those days, automobiles were also known as horseless carriages and a good deal of the design and technology of horse-drawn conveyances naturally went into the Model T and other early designs. That included wooden spoke wheels and the kind of tires that could be fitted to such wheels. Modern tires would have been too heavy for the Model T and would have made for extremely heavy steering. In those days, skinny tires were exactly the type that was needed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By samuel pine on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 03:55 am:

I wish I had homework like that or I'd get an A
all we had was stupid stuff. Truth is all that
"stupid stuff" never made me money till this day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 04:58 am:

Good answers, just want to add this on question #2: Out of the perhaps 15,500,000 Model T's made worldwide, only about a million was sold outside USA. Thus it's likely only about 1/15 of the preserved cars are outside USA. Generally only about 1% of a certain car model remains after more than 30 years - that would make 150,000 Model T's and about 140,000 of them in USA. In later years some restored cars has been exported abroad, maybe a couple of thousand at the most, but noone knows the real numbers - though the number of remaining T's in Sweden is quite extensively researched over 60 years by the Model T club, and it's in the range of about 850 cars.

Got something to add to #11 too: Ford did experiment with a battery powered car together with his friend/idol Edison in 1913/14, but it didn't go further than the two prototypes seen in this article: http://blog.hemmings.com/index.php/2010/05/25/henry-ford-and-the-electric-car/
Henry Ford's experimentation and flirtation with the production of electric automobiles utilizing Edison nickel iron-batteries is covered in Chapter 11 of the book "Taking Charge: The Electric Automobile in America" by Michael Brian Schiffer, published by Smithsonian Institution Press.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 05:41 am:

Nice catch, Roger. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Pergande on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 05:45 am:

If you use the CPI index of inflation...a 1924 Coupe, which sold for $520 would be equivalent in 2016 dollars to $7,300


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Probst on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 07:29 am:

Here is an inflation calculator that you can use. Jack's estimate is very, very close:

http://www.in2013dollars.com/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, mostly in Dearborn on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 07:52 am:

If you get into a discussion of the $5.00 day, you might want to point out that each laborer added about one cent to the cost of each car if you assume a production rate of one car per minute.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 01:42 pm:

I would suggest Q-3 and Q-9 are linked. The famous few listed certainly pioneered the design and industrial engineering of the manufacture of the T. But thousands of workers helped Henry build the model T. I believe today's students benefit from knowing how many people worked in the Ford factories doing things that machines do today. I'm sure someone here knows how many person hours were required to make (not just assemble) the T at the various times during model T production, to me this is important info, and can be summarized without boring kids with too many details.

fyi, Tony mentions Vanadium steel, and that is true. In reading about Vanadium steel in the early history of the Model T, I learned the Vanadium ore was carried in sacks by Llama pack animals from the mountain mines in SA, eventually reaching the rail head and then transshipped to Ford steel mills in the US. Those miners and pack animals all 'helped Henry make the Model T'.

respectfully, jb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 02:33 pm:

Dear Mr. Batta,
You are to be commended for letting these wonderful things into the youngsters heads.
Rich


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