Timer to piston relationship

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Timer to piston relationship
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Adkisson on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 07:30 pm:

Has anyone with the head off the engine ever checked that the timer firing position is the same on all cylinders? Seems to me that this is the time to accurately check the timer and then check the coil time to open at around 1.9-2.0 ms after being told by the timer to fire the spark plug


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Doolittle on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 08:09 pm:

This forum has lots of threads regarding timing by piston position method.
Simply Google "piston position mtfca.com" (without the quotation marks).

I remember the time period around the turn of this century that there was much discussion about it, but don't hear much about it anymore.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 08:12 pm:

Greg,

Click here:

http://www.mtfca.com/cgi-bin/discus/show.cgi?tpc=506218&post=751926#POST751926


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 08:20 pm:

Greg
The relation ship between piston travel and coil firing time is expressed in crankshaft degrees. Obviously this requires an accurate method of testing and adjusting Model T ignition coils.
Here is a link to an article we prepared many years ago explaining this relationship.
Model T Ford Ignition System and Spark Timing
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 08:31 pm:

Let me try again.

1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 08:34 pm:

Model T Ford Ignition Timing and Spark Timing


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 09:15 pm:

Only thing which could change the timing with relation to top of the compression stroke would be
1. Severely bent or misground crankshaft. Very unlikely.
2. A problem with the timer. In this case the timer would be off center or be incorrectly constructed.
3. Timer rod bent or very loose. Note the same position would occur for all cylinders in this case.
4. The spark could appear a little earlier or later if the individual coils are out of adjustment. If one coil takes more amps before the points open that coil would fire late.

Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 10:18 pm:

Norman
Yes, too many others to mention.
When new the Model T ran and drove very well.
I focus upon repairing a Model T so it works like new. Mine runs like a clock because I spent much time getting it right. You can too!
How many times have you been to a Model T tour and seen Model T's that run so poorly they should be at home in the garage?
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 10:21 pm:

Not many here want to hear that talk.
They want to hear how cheaply then can cobble a fix that makes their car run.........like crap.
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 10:35 pm:

You're very Right Ron, That's one reason why so many cars break down on the first days run and others even though may have driven cross country to attend run without problems.

Yes, of course, some things wear out or break unexpectedly maybe like a rear axle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Adkisson on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 10:39 pm:

thanks for the links and articles which I read and understand...the only area that can really upset the timer piston relationship is bad timer mechanical movement/slop etc...etc being anything mechanical in the engine also


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 10:50 pm:

And electrically .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnH on Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 10:54 pm:

No need to take the head off - I used the TW timing gauge to make contact with the pistons, along with a dial gauge for improved accuracy.
I've used this method to check the adjustment of Anderson timer contacts over time, and also to see how accurate the TW timer was.
timing


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration