Practice balancing a transmission drum

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Practice balancing a transmission drum
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, February 22, 2016 - 04:06 pm:

When I asked about this awhile back I got a nice variety of suggestions. I've decided to try the body solder idea. Today I practiced on a junk drum.


I began with Dean's idea of boiling the drum in strong lye for an hour to remove any possible residual oil.


Next was solder application. This morning I happened to be talking to Tom Nolte, the radiator man. When he asked what I was up to and I told him what I was doing, he asked what kind of flux I'm using. I told him it's Johnson's Tin-Ezy, and he said I would have no trouble with it. He was right. The solder flowed right on and stuck nicely.


Next was grinding down the excess solder to balance the drum.


I overdid the solder a bit and had to grind off a lot, but the balancing worked. Tomorrow I'll do the drum I'm going to use in the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, February 22, 2016 - 04:16 pm:

Steve,

Looks like a very nice job. How hot do you figure a drum gets under heavy use?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, February 22, 2016 - 04:28 pm:

I don't know, but certainly not the 361 F or more required to melt solder.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, February 22, 2016 - 04:32 pm:

No, probably not. Just curious though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole - Castelldefels (Spain) on Monday, February 22, 2016 - 05:26 pm:

Steve, that's a grand looking affair you have to check the balance. Is that it's original function?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Monday, February 22, 2016 - 06:28 pm:

Good deal! I wonder if that would work for crankshafts?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, February 22, 2016 - 09:43 pm:

Eric, yes. I bought it at an auction last fall. It had sat out on a trailer in the rain, and I got it for $90. When I got home I looked it up online and found I could buy a new one for about $1000. All it needed was a little steel wool for light surface rust.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan McEachern on Tuesday, February 23, 2016 - 01:10 am:

Ken- no you cannot balance a crankshaft on a static balancer- these are good for one thing only- single plane balancing - flywheels, transmission drums, grinding wheels etc.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, February 23, 2016 - 03:22 am:

Steve, did you touch up the surface to be soldered with the die grinder first, or just solder straight onto the lye cleaned casting?

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Tuesday, February 23, 2016 - 06:38 am:

Dan - I meant the method of adding weight, not the balancer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, February 23, 2016 - 09:32 am:

I just brushed on the flux and applied the solder. I figure the rough cast iron surface should help it stick.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Tuesday, February 23, 2016 - 10:00 am:

Solder also works great for some freeze cracks that are only in the outside water jacket. I once lost the solder/lead in the brake drum on our 2 cylinder REO going down a very steep hill on a tour in Yosemite Park. The brake drum runs in open air and is not cooled with oil. REO used solder/lead to balance the brake drum when Ford was just starting to produce model T's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Skille on Tuesday, February 23, 2016 - 12:23 pm:

Steve, I used an Anderson balancer like yours and made mandrels maybe identical to yours. The way I balanced my drums was with an 8" half round Nicholsen file. I filed in the slots on the heavy side of the drums until they were balanced. When finished you could hardly tell they had been balanced. In a machine shop course I went to in 55 and 56 the first 8 weeks we made things with a file and hack saw. Anyway it worked great and it sure makes a T run smooth and with that much faster.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, February 23, 2016 - 04:31 pm:

Steve, I guess that means the lye treatment worked a treat then. Usually cast needs to be cleaned up really well to take tinning. Hence the use of a die grinder which gets back to clean, bare metal.

Allan from down under.


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