French Ford T "Torpedo"

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: French Ford T "Torpedo"
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ian Dean on Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 05:48 am:

I found this old postcard photo of a Ford Model T with bodywork made by a firm called PRIVAT at Dijon on France. I have never heard of this company before, any ideas? Probably about 1920, what do you think? Why the disc wheels?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew Benoit on Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 06:22 am:

CARROSSERIE AUTOMOBILE DE LUXE ALBERT PRIVAT DIJON

I think this is one of their bodies on the CID Baby. It says Prival but I think that is a typo (first web link).

http://www.bienpublic.com/grand-dijon/2012/10/07/une-fois-deux-fois-adjuge

http://www.thornleykelham.com/gallery/1913-baby-c-i-d/

https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1913_CID_Baby_-_Right.jpg

(Message edited by Ab4875 on February 24, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ian Dean on Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 06:51 am:

Hi Monsieur Benoit
I have looked at your pictures of the CID "Baby" and I am not convinced. I am sure the car is a Ford T chassis with locally built body.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew Benoit on Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 07:21 am:

Hi Ian,

Sorry, I didn't mean to say the car in the postcard was a CID Baby. I was just posting the Baby pics as another example of their work.

As a carrossier (coach builder) they would have built bodies for many different makes of car.

Andrew











(Message edited by Ab4875 on February 24, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ian Dean on Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 07:25 am:

Hi Andrew,
Sorry I got that wrong, Thank you for all the other photo's of their work. Very interesting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew Benoit on Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 07:42 am:

Ian,

Here is a bit more info I found. It looks like he did specialise in Ford Model T's.

http://dijon1900.blogspot.com.au/2010/07/privat-carrossier.html

Andrew


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 08:13 am:

All are Michelin Disc wheels with the exception of the large light colored dual cowl phaeton & the 1 Ton - Michelin must have been a large supplier in Europe ! I still need 1 wheel for a spare - anyone !!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 08:15 am:

Maybe those are Michelin on the phaeton - just larger - they're "offset" with the tube stem inboard.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 04:19 pm:

Steel disc wheels were very common on European (and particularly French) cars, and going way back. Probably this is due to a lack of adequate supplies of strong enough and resilient enough woods for wheel spokes in that part of the world. Once discs became common in local production, they would also be favored for style and familiarity reasons even on imports.
There are only a few (maybe a dozen?) woods the world over that are really adequate for wood spoke wheels and automobile speeds. Wood wheels were used in the USA for so long because the USA had a large supply of Hickory, one of the fastest growing of the strong enough woods. Certain ironwood and osage (orange osage for one) are also said to be good woods for wheel spokes.
Hardness is only one factor necessary for wheel spokes. Oak is a very hard and very strong wood, but should not be used in wheels for cars or trucks to be driven faster than about 20 mph (there are also factors of length and diameter that must be taken into account). As hard as the wood is, oak also tends to be brittle. As speed goes up, the shock to the wheel goes up exponentially. So while oak may be fine for slow early trucks or trailers, and even a few early cars, popcorn wagons, etc, it should never be used for a car as fast as a model T.

Great pictures of some really neat looking cars!
Thanks all.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John P. Steele, Montana on Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 11:24 pm:

Steve saw all those Michelins and immediately thought of you.


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