What is this tool for?? OT.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: What is this tool for?? OT.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nevin Gough on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 12:00 am:

Hi. What is this?? Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 02:54 am:

Is that spoon shaped end? if so I'd warrant it's some sort of tire changing tool.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 06:10 am:

It looks like an oil tool to me. It helps you reach under the car to check the oil level at the petcock.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 08:07 am:

Whenever I see a tool with a split fork on one end, I think ball joint seperator. But the ends are not shaved down fine enough to get in between anything. I'm not sure about the petcock thing as you'd still have to get your arm way under to open the valve 90d.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 08:19 am:

Not exact, but you can see where I got the idea from...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 08:36 am:

Do you have a picture of it before it was put on the railroad track?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 08:45 am:

I think its a tool used on a grease rack to shake the springs when greasing the shackles and prying to to check for play


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 09:13 am:

That is a old Boilermaker/Ironworker tool for fitting up structural steel. The forked/open end is used like a clamp on the edge of a I-beam, angle iron, or edges of flat plates to clamp/fit them up for making up bolts or for fitting weld joints. It also allows you to twist something into position for line-up of edges or bolt holes, ect. We called them a "moke-um bar" The other end is just to pry big heavy things around with and save you fingers. :-) I have used them all thru my 35 years of being a Boilermaker. I had a ring on my "rigging belt" special made for that tool. I just dropped it into the ring on my right side and the thing would just swing and flap all day long, bouncing against my right leg. Did it so long it does not feel natural without one in my tool belt. They could have been used for other things but they were original made and designed by the boilermaker/ironworkers to use in the railroad yards, ship building trade, and the high rise structural steel sky scraper work ... I have seen different sizes of the tool (small, medium, large, and "damn that thing is big", sizes)..... have fun and be safe. and remember ... "count you fingers before you start a project, and after you finish" "if the number is still the same, you did good" :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 12:33 pm:

Donnie, The voice of experience! Thank you for sharing this bit of knowledge.

BTW, How is your speedster coming? Just wondering.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 03:18 pm:

i had several of those exact thing that came with a bunch of army surplus parts i bought. nice tools, very strong. i had always thought they were for some kind of tank repair.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 04:52 pm:

Lots of uses for that tool. If you needed to move a big heavy piece of structural I-Beam, railroad track, heavy flat bar, ect. Four guys could take four of these tools. (everyone was supposed to have one) and use the tools as handles to pick it up and take off with it. You are far enough off to the side that if you were to drop it, your toes were safe. Keith, I have the body basically finished, I have the windshield basically finished, I changed direction on the engine details, so it set me back a little as to time. But I think it will be worth it. I will do a speedster up-date as soon as I return from Chickasha with the "change of direction" in my possession. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 05:35 pm:

Donnie's right. The Blacksmiths on my job used "bender bars" very similar to that. Some were much larger.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nevin Gough on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 06:57 pm:

Thanks for all the info!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 10:09 pm:

Donnie, Thanks for that. I'll be looking forward to your Speedster update after Chickasha.

Keith


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