Oiling my T's flip tops

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Oiling my T's flip tops
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Blanchard on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 09:29 pm:

Okay, (obviously I'm new to this) so I flip open the oil/grease cups on the front axle (and all around).... now what do I put in there? Same oil as in engine? Something heavier? Grease? Butter :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 09:34 pm:

Some folks like chain saw bar oil.It runs slower.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 09:35 pm:

You'll get a whole bunch of opinions here Robert, but personally, I like chain saw bar oil in the oil can for the "flip tops" because it's a bit sticky and seems to "linger" longer where you want it, and I like boat trailer wheel bearing grease as it's more waterproof than most greases. Bottom line is, whatever you use, it'll probably be better than what was used during the Model T ear,......FWIW,......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 09:36 pm:

Sorry Jack,....we were typing at the same time,......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Blanchard on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 09:53 pm:

How about 600w?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 09:59 pm:

I use 600w. I think it is clings better than chain saw oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 10:44 pm:

Motor oil.

I would rather have it lubricate and be messy than be sticky and not go where it's supposed to.

By the way, I have been informed that Dyke's service manual from that time period recommended motor oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 11:08 pm:

To each his own. IMHO motor oil is to light and will wick out. I have found that 600w will get to where it needs to be and will stay there as long as the clearance between the parts is not excessive. Over the last 30 years I have the oily hands from maintaining several T's to prove it! Chain and Bar oil works as well but my observation has been that 600w works the best. Whatever you use is better than what they had back in the day. Apply it very often and you will likely have good results.

(Message edited by paulmikeska on February 25, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 11:21 pm:

The factory manual says motor oil and I agree.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 11:44 pm:

The 600w oil sold by the vendors is Shell Omala 680 extreme pressure lubricant or the equivalent. Think about it. Again to each his own. I do not care what you use. As I said before, whatever you use is better than what was available in the day and if you use it often you are not going to have any problems. There is a lot of information available on this forum. Some good and some bad. I have learned a lot on this forum by having an open mind!

(Message edited by paulmikeska on February 25, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, February 26, 2016 - 12:20 am:

When I asked, Don recommended a 35.3/64.7 mix of dog's blood and monkey pus.
Xypexco sells it by the drum under their Dyethylene-9 Ultra label.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, February 26, 2016 - 01:37 am:

I was told that 600W is Saturated Steam Cylinder oil. Now, for some reason I have about 5 gallons of it, courtesy Mother McCloud (the last week they ran their steam engine).
Now, it will stick around, that's one of the design properties! But I don't know if it's fluid enough to travel down the king pin to do the job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Friday, February 26, 2016 - 01:54 am:

"The factory manual says motor oil" Well since Henry said it we all duty bound to agree to that and there is no room for any argument! On top of that we have to all can agree that there has been no change in lubrication technology since then! I think that MOST of us know better!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Friday, February 26, 2016 - 02:23 am:

David,

You are correct, it is used as a steam cylinder oil. I had a job maintaining 2 narrow gauge steam engines a long, long time ago. Since then I have used it on Model T's and found that it is fluid enough, and somehow finds a way to travel down the king pins to "do the job". It also finds a way to lubricate the spring perches and all other things that need to be oil lubricated on a T and will stay there. However, there are some folks that will use castor oil if someone recommended it in a Dykes manual 100 years ago!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, February 26, 2016 - 04:03 am:

Garrett and I use modified bitumen roofing tar.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Blanchard on Friday, February 26, 2016 - 07:15 am:

Can one "thin out" 600w a bit? Just wondering... and how would you go about it, lets say, to make it 500w.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Friday, February 26, 2016 - 07:40 am:

Paul, as long as you continue to argue with yourself, I am content watch.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, February 26, 2016 - 12:26 pm:

Just as a clarification, as some might not understand the terminology "Saturated Steam Cylinder Oil." Steam can be used as it comes from the boiler at slightly about 212 degrees, or it can then be sent through "superheaters;" pipes the expose the steam to more heat from the firebox, which elevates the temperatures and "drys" out the steam, creating superheated steam much hotter than 212degrees. Steam cylinder oil is used to provide lubrication inside the steam engine cylinders, so there are two kinds, Saturated and Superheated; the superheated oil works at higher temperatures.
And now you know more trivia than you wanted to, and no, it's not likely to come up on Jeopardy!
:-)
OH, and the reason to do this is for greater thermal efficiency and reduce steam & water consumption.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Friday, February 26, 2016 - 12:43 pm:

I stopped using oil on the flip top of my cans years ago.

It makes the beer taste strange!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Friday, February 26, 2016 - 01:48 pm:

I used my model A 600w left over from my last rear axle service. Not sure if thats the right thing myself!!! Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, February 26, 2016 - 01:50 pm:

Cue Canned laughter :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Friday, February 26, 2016 - 08:38 pm:

Whatever I have on hand
Steam oil gear lube engine oil chain saw oil
Variety is ok price is even better


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Friday, February 26, 2016 - 09:37 pm:

I agree with Royce. Lets take the king pins for an example. I like to know that when I oil that king pin the oil is going to run down to the bottom bushing. I don't think getting 600 weight oil is going to easy to put in a twist oiler, and not much easier to put in a flip top either! I'll stick with the motor oil.


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