Transmission assembly: How much runout is permissible at the ball cap?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Transmission assembly: How much runout is permissible at the ball cap?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, February 27, 2016 - 02:54 pm:

The title says it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Saturday, February 27, 2016 - 03:17 pm:

Minimal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, February 27, 2016 - 03:21 pm:

OK, I'll look for that on the indicator. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, February 27, 2016 - 03:49 pm:

I think the shims are .020". If it's more than .020" add a shim.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Saturday, February 27, 2016 - 04:03 pm:

If you are talking about the drive plate at the ball cap? then .0015", again like what you did with the trans shaft, rotate the drive plate each bolt hole on the brake drum to find the best run out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, February 27, 2016 - 04:26 pm:

Yes, the drive plate. That .0015" is pretty strict. The best I've got so far is .004". I've got it to .0015" a couple of times with the bolts snug, but torquing them down throws it off. I'll keep working on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By lorenzo leon on Saturday, February 27, 2016 - 04:57 pm:

Steve I think Mike said on the Video .004 to .006 Its happy ,That is run out at the tail shaft [output]


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Saturday, February 27, 2016 - 06:09 pm:

I had the same issue when I tightened down the bolts on the drive plate. In the end I had to turn the mounting surface of the drive plate to remove the majority of the run out. Ended up with .006" TIR on the output shaft. For a 100 year old car that was built originally with little or no quality control .006" will work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, February 27, 2016 - 06:13 pm:

My recollection of Mike's video matches Lorenzo's. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, February 27, 2016 - 06:27 pm:

Oh, you mean where the shaft goes thru the ball cap. I would be happy at .002 - .004" there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie Spokane, WA on Saturday, February 27, 2016 - 06:45 pm:

I think Frank's advice is good, but Mike's is more practical. Your hub shaft is pretty true, so the tail shaft will kind of "universal joint" around on the slop in the system. Especially if you only have one bushing in the brake drum (which is the preferred number).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Saturday, February 27, 2016 - 08:08 pm:

Steve
There is a solution available. My "floating" transmission shaft will soon be available in the US from Dan Hatch


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 04:48 am:

I think that what this is all about is to prevent the loading on the crankshaft and eventually breaking it at the flange. Les' "floating transmission shaft" is the solution.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 07:26 am:

Tom Carnegie is correct. The transmission flat already is "floating" within the tolerance of the space between the hub shaft and the bushing inside your drive plate.

Can someone point to any evidence that the techs at the Ford plant held up production by "true-ing shafts", or by un-bolting, rotating 180 and re-measuring??? I may be wrong, but I am inclined to doubt it. My guess is they bolted up what they had and sent it down the line - most likely never measuring any of that. They most likely relied on 100% inspection of each individual part - not the assembly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel D. Chicoine, MD, Pierre, SD on Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 09:12 am:

Great to hear your floating shaft will be available again, Les. I have 2 and was wondering about how to do my next engine.


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