Old Photo - Heading Out To Deliver A Truck Load Of Coal

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Old Photo - Heading Out To Deliver A Truck Load Of Coal
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, February 27, 2016 - 11:19 pm:

I am not ancient, but I do remember the coal being delivered to our basement back on Long Island in the 1950's and my parents shoving coal into the furnace.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 12:19 am:

I got a news flash for you Jay, ... I am ancient and I never saw the 50's. That makes you double-extra ancient ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 12:31 am:

A picture like this today would probably be banned as a micro-aggression against the earth!...Thanks Jay for posting it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 08:09 am:

The boss wrote "1 ton" on the truck to prevent overloading. Doesn't seem to be working.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 08:21 am:

As a West Virginian, I am here to tell you that coal is still used in homes TODAY here in the Mountain State. It's certainly not wide-spread, but I can stand here on this mountain and at times, I can faintly smell the sweet aroma of coal fired stoves here is Back Creek Valley. Almost heaven...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - West Melbourne Florida on Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 09:05 am:

James, My wife's parents are from Doddridge county, near Clarksburg.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 09:11 am:

My Grandmother's house in Brooklyn N.Y. had a odd little room under the concrete front steps with a tiny window in it. Was being used as a storage space. It was a coal storage bin originally and the opening was for the coal delivery chute. The furnace had been converted to oil before I was born.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 09:12 am:

You can no longer buy even a single chunk of coal here in Wacko Land California.


James "Almost heaven" reminds me of this song.

Take Me Home, Country Roads
John Denver

Almost heaven, West Virginia
Blue ridge mountains, Shenandoah river
Life is old there, older than the trees
Younger than the mountains, growin' like a breeze

Country roads, take me home
To the place I belong
West Virginia, mountain momma
Take me home, country roads

All my memories, they gather 'round her
Miner's lady, stranger to blue water
Dark and dusty, painted on the sky
Misty taste of moonshine, teardrops in my eyes

Country roads, take me home
To the place I belong
West Virginia, mountain momma
Take me home, country roads

I hear her voice in the mornin' hour she calls me
The radio reminds me of my home far away
And drivin' down the road I get a feeling
That I should have been home yesterday, yesterday

Country roads, take me home
To the place I belong
West Virginia, mountain momma
Take me home, country roads

Country roads, take me home
To the place I belong
West Virginia, West Virginia, mountain momma, oh momma
Take me home, country roads
Take me home, down country roads
Take me home, down country roads


Listen to it here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1vrEljMfXYo


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 09:37 am:

We had coal from time to time but it was expensive and we used wood most of the time.Coal was nice as it would last all night in the furnance but all houses could not burn coal.It was dirty gritty time and i do not miss it! Bud in Wheeler,Mi.PS,Corn is not perfect either as yesterday i found two mummfied mice!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 11:00 am:

Will.. I am on the opposite side of the state near Virginia. The entire state is great Model T country!
Jay - great song. It is sung before every Mountaineer football game and the stadium comes alive.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 07:14 pm:

On another recent thread, I reminisced about my great grandmother that had raised my dad after his mother became ill about 1931. All of her life, from the age of six, to almost 100, she cooked on a coal stove. I can still remember pancakes or stew being cooked on that stove of hers when I was little myself. Any time someone mentions cooking or heating with coal, I remember that stove.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 07:27 pm:

There was a big wood burning range/oven in my grandparents house but i never saw coal burned in it? I know many stoves never had the shaker grates for coal? At one time there were a few small coal mines around central Mi but the coal was very low grade? Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 08:04 pm:

I bought a foot warmer off eBay a couple of years ago. It is in great shape with good (albeit old) carpet still there and came with a new chunk of coal in the burner.
Very cool.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 08:10 pm:

If I could still get coal locally, that's what I'd burn. The BTU potential is 10x what wood
will deliver for about 1/10 the space it takes to store it. With a good, hot fire, it will show
no smoke at the stack at all and us near odorless. I agree with Mr. Lyons, when you can
smell it, it has a wonderful, acrid smell of times long ago.

Growing up, I would catch a whiff of that smell up around the end of our road at Newcastle
Rd. It was years before I figured out what it was and that it was the Van Ryn's who were
still burning coal in their furnace in the 1970's. And why not ? They were the ones that still
had every car they ever owned since 1912 in their various outbuildings ! Some people just
know how to do it right. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Sunday, February 28, 2016 - 11:27 pm:

Out in the wild west we had "Presto Logs" delivered. These were 8"in x 24" in diameter rolled with saw dust compressed with light oil, wax and chemicals to light easily and burn hot. These were easily broken apart with a small hammer or camping ax. You just piled them in your wood burner and used a match to get them going. Like coal they would radiate heat all night long.

The truck delivered to your home in wheeled racks and you paid in cash for the amount you required. they had a nice wood/chemical smell when burning.

Yes, I remember the coal truck and particularly the noise when the truck dumped the coal down the shoot.

We also had the ice man delivering blocks of ice. If we followed him he would use his ice pick and give each kid a sliver of ice on the hot days.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Monday, February 29, 2016 - 12:57 am:

I remember coal being delivered to a grid near the front door at the house in Prestwich and it went down to the basement. What I remember even more vividly was that I, as the eldest son with a disabled Dad, I had to bring it up from the basement to the kitchen stove twice a day.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Monday, February 29, 2016 - 07:45 am:

Growing up in the 50's. Not only do I remember the coal man, there was the rag man, who still used a horse and wagon, the ice man, the milk man, the bread man, vegetable man, grocery home delivery, knife sharpener, doctors making house calls and the trash men. They used open dump trucks and three men, one to drive, one throwing the trash up to another in the back of the truck who then dumped and piled the trash,and ash pick up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Haworth - El Centro, CA. on Monday, February 29, 2016 - 10:10 am:

I grew up in San Diego. It was in College (SDSC) in the early 60s when I first touched a piece of coal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, February 29, 2016 - 01:06 pm:

Jay - You're only remembering half of it! Ha ha,....besides the coal being delivered and your parents shoveling it into the furnace, there was hauling those reddish-brown clinkers out to the alley and using them to partially fill the potholes in the cinder alleys like we did in Chicago.

Burger - Allow me to add just a bit to your description of the wonderful aroma of coal smoke,...up to a point that is; like many good things, too much is,....well,....too much. However, and this might get David Dewey to reminiscing here, around the railroad back in steam engine days, to me, the "aroma" of the mixture of hot steam, hot steam cylinder oil, and coal smoke is like none other and that to this day, would bring tears to my eyes! (,,,,,and NOT because of the air pollution factor either!) To me, that was an aroma that would beat even the finest perfume!

Dan Killecut - Yes, I've commented a time or two that I feel like "Grandma" and I have actually witnessed the very last remnants of the "horse-drawn" era in Chicago. Even up to and including my high school days, I remember the horse drawn wagons of "rag man", the "scrap iron collector", and the knife sharpening wagons, slowly making their way up and down the alleys.

This has been a fun thread, but sure makes me feel "old",.....I think to term "old" does sound a bit better than "ancient", but then,.....it is what it is I guess,......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Monday, February 29, 2016 - 01:59 pm:

I remember burning coal in one of the houses I lived in down in southern IL in the late 70's. It was cheap heat. Other than shoveling the clinkers out of the furnace now and then, it was hard to beat for the money: $40/ton. The only part of coal I didn't like was when they delivered a load fresh from the mine, the benzene smell was sort of annoying in the house for a few hours before it cleared. Now I burn mostly wood, but hard coal is sure nice heat if you can find it economically.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, February 29, 2016 - 10:18 pm:

For Harold: :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, February 29, 2016 - 10:22 pm:

For Harold: :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 12:29 am:

Harold,
Yes, that combination of steam, cylinder oil and coal is a unique aroma & texture. I grew up around oil burning steamers, but about 20 years ago we went to Ely, Nevada and rode the Nevada Northern; I lucked out and got a cab ride around the yard. The minute I landed on the deck I could feel and smell the difference. WOW!! THAT was Steam Railroading! Completely different compared to oil burning!
Burger, great photo; Cumbres & Toltec??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 02:39 am:

Burger - Thanks,....but I'm way ahead of you! I often check profiles in hopes of a photo of another "T" guy's car, but your profile picture that I checked out long ago surprised me. Cumbres & Toltec Scenic RR, right? A very nice telephoto shot for sure, except that the more zoom the worse the track looks, right? Wife & I have ridden the Durango & Silverton twice now, and almost rode the C&TS this last summer but even on a nearly 2-month motorhome trip, family "deadlines" screwed it up! By the way, I think you and I and David Dewey (and maybe a few other Model "T" Forum guys too) have some "common interests",.....I know that besides old Fords, I like just about everything old, and being a 4th generation railroader, I have a "thing" about steam engines, and it doesn't much matter how big or small either. In fact, my favorite "type" would have to be the 4-4-0 American Standard. For a lot of the same reasons I have a love for Model "T" Fords I guess,.....they both played a major part in building America!

David Dewey - Short story you'll like,...(maybe Burger too).

I've ridden the cab of quite a few steam engines in my lifetime, starting as a kid, going with my G'pa, a SooLine "hogger" from 1911 'till his retirement in 1954, right up to and including riding the UP3985 Challenger from Portland, Oregon to Hood River, Oregon a couple years before I retired from the UPRR Police Department. Ya' see, it just so happens that the fireman on that trip was the now late Lynn Nystrom, who was an ex Rock Island Special Agent, and so of course, well,.......'nuff said,....anyway,......my "story".....

A few years before I retired, I was invited to ride with a fellow I knew that was an engineer on a little 2-8-2 Mikado (Porter-1927) out here in Washington. (Mount Rainier Scenic RR). I mentioned to him that even my wife has a "thing" about steam engines as her Dad and my Dad worked together on the IHB railroad in Chicago from the late '30's 'till into the '70's. And by the way, this ol' hog-head's name is Harold too, so, well,....after some "chit-chat", Harold said, "well, I'll be running this Santa Claus train here in Tacoma for the rest of the afternoon, so why don't you go home and get the wife and bring her back and we'll taker her for a ride on the engine too"! So, I did.

Kathy enjoyed "the ride" very much, but on the way home she remarked to me that there was only one thing wrong. I said,...."really? What was wrong? She replied,...."it didn't smell right". Can't tell you how proud of her I was that she picked up on that! You see, her Dad used to take her to work with him once in awhile when she was just a little girl and when he was still firing "coal burners" before he was "set up running". Of course those big Indiana Harbor Belt 2-8-2 Mikados were coal burners, and the sweet coal smell was what she remembered while riding that oil burning engine on the Mount Rainier Scenic in Tacoma that day! I guess like Model "T's, some of that RR stuff gets in you blood too!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 03:26 am:

Harold,
Great story! My Linda like trains too, and has had a few cab rides herself. Wow, 3985 & Lynn (GREAT guy!) I am soo jealous. One of my old toy train & steamboating friends had a few cab rides on the SP he used to mention to me, because they were in the cabs of the Daylight PAs. Augh, can never top that one (well, unless I get a ride in Doyle's PA, but that won't likely happen)! I know, it's a dismal, but it's the only dismal given the title of "Honorary Steam Engine."
Hmm, I don't know if we posted about this before, but one of my folk's close friends was Jim Nelson, who was the Shasta Division Special Agent. He had a pic on his mantle of President Kennedy & he on a train's end car platform.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 04:16 am:

Hmmm,......Jim Nelson,.......have heard the name but can't say I knew him,.....maybe before my time out here on the UPRR.

Does Doyle McCormak still have the Alco "PA" at Brooklyn Yard in Portland? I don't know about "a ride", but I can sure get us into Brooklyn Yard and the roundhouse if it's still there. Something makes me think that the 4449 and the "PA" and a lot of that has all changed since I retired 14 years ago though. And, we're all getting old David,.......???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 08:44 am:

Look at my profile photo.

Herb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 10:14 am:

My father's house (actually my grandmother's house) had coal heat into the 50s. My grandmother also had a combination gas/coal stove. She liked the coal for cooking, but the gas for baking. The house also had the original gas jets for lighting (in addition to electric). They had never bothered to remove the gas when electricity was installed. During the aftermath of hurricane Carol in 1954, the house was the only one around with lighting.
This was Newton, MA., not some tiny rural town.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 10:21 am:

I agree Harold. I love a lot of old stuff. I too have had a steam cab ride in B&A #403, Alco D-1A 4-6-6T. I have also ridden the Durango and Silverton RR back when the D&RGW still owned it.
My big regret is that I never saw a NYC Niagara. They didn't run them into Boston. I saw plenty of the Hudsons and Super Hudsons, but IMHO the Niagara was the greatest steam locomotive of all time, and the only one that operated for less money per drawbar horsepower then the equivalent amount of Diesel horsepower - and that is a documented fact.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 11:09 am:

Yes, C&T.

Me no likum oil burners. Wood or dirt. Oil burns too clean, and the jet engine whine of the oil injection
is just not right. Like having a Toyota engine in a T. The proper sound of a T engine is a large part of
the overall character and attraction to the vehicle.

Of course, nothing is simple for me ... A.D.D. or whatever, I bore easily with the common, even if it is
the common of the rare. Give me 3 feet between the rails, and ringed domes, a belled stack, spoked
wheels, and all the "proper" gee-gaw that separates a pre 1900 locomotive from the long black tubes
that came later. Now THAT is what a locomotive is supposed to look like !






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Saylor, Citrus Heights, Ca on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 11:43 am:

My son works for Union Pacific RR. He says they transport a lot of coal here is California. Its being used for commercial power generation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 11:45 am:

When I was young our home in Taunton Ma was heated by a bunch of oil stoves but it had a coal bin in the basement with some coal in it.

I remember making snowmen in the winter and going to the coal bin to get coal for the eyes and mouth. The nose was always a carrot.

When my dad installed central heating I helped him empty the coal bin so the oil tank could be placed in it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Claverie, Memphis TN on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 12:51 pm:

Here in Memphis, the east-west railroad line runs parallel to Poplar Avenue, one of the main streets of town.

Twice a day, a train consisting of 120 cars of coal, pulled by 2 locomotives and pushed by one or two, heads East, momentarily blocking our crossings. I have sat and counted the cars many times.

Later, the train of empty cars comes back. I presume they are loaded at the Mississippi River, and I presume the coal comes in by barge.

Last winter, when it got extremely cold (which it hasn't done this year), there were three trains a day.

I'm told this coal goes to a Power Station, which feeds Memphis and Jackson, TN, and through the grid to Nashville. There is also a coal-fired power plant right here in Memphis, down along the river. It's being converted to Natural Gas, which apparently means building a whole new plant.

The coal in these cars is in small pieces - maybe the size of lemons.

Oh, and the couplers on these cars are of the rotating type. It appears the cars are dumped by physically rotating the whole car. I've seen this described in Lionel literature, but never seen it in action. It would seem to explain how 120 cars can be dumped and turned around so quickly.

So, while coal is no longer available for home use, it certainly is still used for power generation!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 01:37 pm:

Herb,The 765 run's up this way often and once the grandson and i chased it double heading with the 1225!!Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 02:11 pm:

Peter - You are correct in that coal is still used for power generation, however, I honestly believe that we (maybe even an old guy like me) will live to see the use for coal for electric power dwindle down to a trickle, mostly (and I probably should add,...."appropriately") due to environmental considerations. It is interesting that our two largest railroads, Union Pacific and Burlington Northern Sante Fe seemed to fare very well during the USA economic "downturn" that began in 2008. I know for a fact that UPRR had several record-breaking quarters since 2008. But,.....not lately! For quite some time, coal was the most important commodity they hauled, and was one huge reason the UPRR has done as well as it has, and I'm pretty sure that the same thing applies to the BNSF. However, for the last year or two, the coal business has begun to drop off significantly, and it really shows in the revenue! No more "record-breaking" quarters lately. For the first time in years, there are fewer coal trains out of Wyoming on UPRR and BNSF than previously. And I don't know about BNSF, but the UPRR has had a couple big "force reductions" in management, caused in large part by the slow-down of their coal train business. Anyway, for what it's worth,......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Mills_Cherry Hill NJ on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 02:38 pm:

I am NOT older than some of you and I always sensed we were a bit poor on the disposable income scene when I was little, but no great shakes as everybody for the blocks around there in the city was in the same boat.

We had a coal furnace, we had a coal stove in the kitchen, and NO heat other than a gravity lift chase that went to the second floor in my parents room. Dad was OC about when and how much coal went in...was OK...not on my chore list as he was the only one who did the coal.

I remember the coal deliveries and to this day keenly am aware of the sound of coal chunks 'shushing' down the chute and into the bin. In the kitchen we'd get dressed next to the stove and I am not sure but I think it went like this. Built to a roaring internal inferno when Dad got up...banked to the sides maybe at noon, and Mom would time her baking to take advantage of just when and how hot the stove was expected to stay (I remember my Mom could make a merangue pie that had the barest of brown tips yet my older sisters were always blackened :-) )

We got a gas stove by the end of the 50's and if I recall correctly I think it was a package deal where the heater and water heater was changed out at the same time. Funny end to that story...

Dad built a completely new house in 1961. All gas and this time with a blower on the heater! He put the heater under the bathroom and sized the dedicated trunk line that you'd almost burn your hand on the register! Mom complained...his answer was...When I was little, we had to chamber pot on the back porch or head for the outhouse in sub zero weather...when I was a teen it was now inside but in a room that was only heated by hot water evaporating from the tub so that didn't help much...this last house had a heavy cast iron tub that was always too cold on my butt! I built this house, I want to stand here naked if I have to and hear and feel the heat blowing up and past me. :-):-) My answer to that was, "Yeah, OK, but can we do something about the eyes watering from the heat?" :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 04:53 pm:

Herb, that's a GREAT profile pic!
Harold, Brain fart! Jim was the son, the Dad was Carl! He retired when it was still SP, his Son Jim, though, did work for UP, but I think in engine service--I've lost touch over the years after both Carl and Bernadine passed on. Great folks.The Brooklyn roundhouse is gone, the area is now an intermodel transfer station, I'm told. Doyle & his gang built a new engine house and the three steamers and the PA are in it now. The PA is very close to running--the prime mover does run, still have a LOT of wiring to do. No, I am getting more experienced, and forgetting more stuff! The image in the mirror is someone else! :-)
Burger, love those pics, yes Baldwin pattern domes do have that "look" to them! That and Arch-bar trucks with spoked wheels. :-)
I'm not certain ending coal use will prove long-term to be a good thing, but we'll see what technology brings us.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 07:01 pm:

Yeah David,....."we'll see what technology brings us". Kinda' scares me to tell you the truth. So far, "technology" has brought us nuclear power plants, which has brought us Chernoble, and much, much worse, the Tsunami disaster in Japan, which by the way, seems to me to have been kept very quiet! Hmmm.......?

My Dad has been gone for over 20 years now, but he used to say something that I have always kept in mind, because I'm afraid that he just might have been right. He said that when the end comes, it's going to be,........."because mankind will have started something that he can't stop!"

Maybe we'll end up thinking we should have stuck to coal, huh?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn - Lincoln, NE on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 07:32 pm:

Here is another good shot. While on a club tour in Southern Colorado we were taking a break when the train just happened by. It made a great period correct photo op with the 1925 Baldwin 2-8-2 Narrow Gauge Locomotive.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Saylor, Citrus Heights, Ca on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 07:48 pm:

I understand the coal being hauled from the west, Valero and Chevron, is actually Coke, a byproduct of oil refining. That may be the small pieces Paul is seeing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 10:03 pm:

Harold, you read between my lines perfectly.
Decades ago, when nuclear annihilation was a major worry (like it shouldn't be now??)we were asked to write a paper on what fate might befall mankind. My paper was basically that I wasn't too worried about the bomb because everyone was watching them--my concern was that something we do that no one is paying close attention to will do us in.
That worry is still with me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 10:20 pm:

In Herb's photo above of 765, is the cop driving a brass T cop car ? And is he writing up the
locomotive operator for creating such an awful eyesore/nuisance against humanity ???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, March 01, 2016 - 11:51 pm:

Burger - No,....the cop has nothing to do with the brass Model T. Due to the composition of the picture, I'd say the guy that took this picture owns and drives the Model T and is just tickled to death that he was able to position it in such a way as to get a picture of his "T" with the locomotive behind it in the picture too. And I'm pretty sure that the cop is a RR cop, and wishes that they'd relocate that steam locomotive anywhere else that is not in his territory so that he could then quit worrying about "foamers" climbing all over it and other "low-lifes" stealing anything they could get off of it in the way of "souvenirs. The reason the RR cop wishes the steam locomotive was somewhere else is because he has real work to do instead of just hanging around this locomotive, which he has to do, 'cause if anything bad happens to it, he'd be the one to have to answer for it. Believe me, I know, 'cause I've had to spend time doing similar things equally as ridiculous! Ha ha,....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, March 02, 2016 - 01:06 am:

Harold,

All those years playing cop has made you a cynical old fart like me !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Wednesday, March 02, 2016 - 03:17 am:

Oh, I don't know,......not really "cynical",.....maybe more like just be'n real, huh?

After 34 years of it, somebody asked me how I liked railroad police work. My reply was that quite often in my career, I'd actually done a bit of police work, and some of it was kinda' neat!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Wednesday, March 02, 2016 - 03:23 am:

.........and some of it wasn't!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, March 02, 2016 - 10:55 am:

I try to explain myself in a similar way ... most of the world goes around with their head
in the sand, dreaming of a Disneyland life where nothing bad ever happens to THEM ....
that is, until it does ! And then they are all "shocked" that anyone could do such "terrible"
things !!!

No, sweetheart .... this is REAL life. You've been living in your comfy little bubble of
complacency. :-)


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