Paint Code

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Paint Code
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Grover on Thursday, March 10, 2016 - 09:55 pm:

Need paint code for "channel green" for 1926 Ford. Anyone?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steven miller on Thursday, March 10, 2016 - 10:19 pm:

Here's a start
http://www.autocolorlibrary.com/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steven miller on Thursday, March 10, 2016 - 10:22 pm:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/411789.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Thursday, March 10, 2016 - 10:27 pm:

Just use the later Model A green and that is close to Model T Channel green, Model T 'Channel Green' is identical the Ditzler Automotive Finishes PPG brand 'Kewanee Green' code #546.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, March 11, 2016 - 12:54 am:

Dan, you certain it isn't Elkpoint Green? Kewanee is the lighter green, Elkpoint, if mixed properly is a Dark Green--sometimes it is mixed as a grey-green, but that's not the color the original Elkpoint was on my Sport Coupe (which, sadly, was painted with the grey-green. There is a chance there was that much variation in original colors??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jon Crane on Friday, March 11, 2016 - 01:04 am:

Is there a paint matching "gun" for the color matching automotive paints? The shop I went to had one for the base/clear coat system but not the older automotive paints. I would like to get some touchup paint that matches what is on the 20 year old restoration that I have.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, March 11, 2016 - 02:30 am:

Jon, when matching the original colour on my last two restorations, my paint supplier simply matched the colour by eye to the sample panels I provided. It took two goes each time. Picking the colours from a set of small colour chips is not ideal, but it gets you near enough so that a second attempt usually does the job.

They have colour reference charts with thousands of variations. Each one has a reference number so that it can be duplicated at will.

There is an internationally recognised system of colour description, Munsell numbers, developed to describe soil colours originally.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Friday, March 11, 2016 - 09:31 am:

Gary: Rob Chamberlin of thepaintguyz.com mixed a can of channel green paint for me last fall at Hershey. Rob's phone number is 4 one seven 86zero 89five zero. I have no connection to this company but they were extremely helpful when I stopped at their booth. respectfully, jb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, March 11, 2016 - 02:31 pm:

Allen's post reminded me of decades ago when I had a Nash Metropolitan, blue and white. One of the folks at the resort who had their own trailer was up fishing and saw my car. He worked for DuPont in the Bay Area in the paint department that was supplying the Numi auto plant (joint Chevy & Toyota)and said, "Next time I'm up, I'll bring you some paint!" About a month later he hands me this gallon of auto paint, and the color was dead on! Nope, he didn't have a formula, he just looked at the car and remembered what the color looked like!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 06:40 am:

I have always wondered if there were color variations of Deep Channel Green, or what I am occasionally looking at is oxidized/faded paint. I've seen original traces of Deep Channel Green on untouched cars that varies from almost being black to something I can best describe as being a military OD green. I've always wondered if color variations were due to differing vendors, changing color specs from Ford, or simply due to fading as pyroxylin paint pigments were somewhat unstable over time. Not sure there's one correct answer here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 01:17 pm:

Well, the Elkpoint green I have on my A, which, as I said is greyer than the original paint (Too bad I was so young when I had it painted, nowadays I would have insisted on a remix)was factory mixed to the Ditzler formulas in Acrylic Lacquer; this was in 1973, if memory serves me.
That's why I wonder if there was originally that much variation. I have seen other cars with this same version of Elkpoint Green.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By M G Hillhouse on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 03:47 pm:

FWIW, I remember after stripping off the hand painted black from Dad's April '27 Touring we found the original darker green. Dad removed the dash and took it to an old-timer at the paint supply. He told us there were over 20 formulas. He matched the original after buffing which came out more of a darker teal green than what is considered the darker, I believe Brewster green, that is accepted now. This was in 1962. I can't help to believe standard wasn't as standard as we try to make it today. MG


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 10:52 pm:

One thing to remember when trying to match paintwork is to make sure your original sample is glossy. My paint man sprayed clear over my sanded back sample to give it a wet look before trying to match it. You can get some idea of the effect just by wetting your original paint with water. It makes all colours look darker.

Allan from down under.


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