OT- Maybe, but we can all learn, Trailer Safety

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: OT- Maybe, but we can all learn, Trailer Safety
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Friday, March 11, 2016 - 02:39 pm:

This maybe a little off topic, but a lot of us have and use trailers. A local older gent was loading an F150 on to a borrowed trailer with a winch, when the F 150 got away. It ran over the front of trailer and pinned him to the tow truck, killing him. Guys, lets all be safe when we do stuff like this. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, March 11, 2016 - 02:52 pm:

You're absolutely right in your caution. Many of us are just not as young as we were. As I get closer to 70 I find myself taking more time to do things because I know that once it goes south it's probably too late to correct the situation.

A lot of you younger guys should heed what Dan says too. A minute or two to recheck things before putting them in motion is time very well spent!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Friday, March 11, 2016 - 03:08 pm:

Rechecking and not standing in a position that will get yourself pinched if something goes awry. I see so many people that stand right at the tongue when helping a buddy hitch their truck to a trailer, or guys that stand at the front wall of an enclosed trailer while somebody else drives the car inside. Either way, a split second of the vehicle getting away and you'll get smushed. Stand to one side and at least you'll live to tell your buddies how the accident happened.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, March 11, 2016 - 04:31 pm:

The cooling fan on a running engine has a natural path of destruction it will generally follow if it breaks loose while running. Lathes and saws and grinding stones all also have natural flight paths if something goes wrong while in use. Many things, including cars being loaded onto or off trailers, have similar predictable paths of destruction.
When I was very young, hanging around my dad's work, and my grandparent's ranch, they were all good enough to teach me that. "Don't stand there, move over a few feet that way, because if the grinding stone were to explode it will fly out in this area." Things like that were said many times. Always, they were said with love and respect (well, most of the time).
It is something all young people SHOULD be taught. However, most are not. But it hopefully is not too late. If you are under 60 years old? Think about it. You are going to slow down as you age. Things DO go wrong. Sometimes with no reason to expect it. Thinking about those predictable paths of destruction should be a habit for everyone. The most important safety feature of any machinery is our own mind and our awareness. This becomes even more true as we get older.
Thanks all! Occasional reminders are a good thing for all of us.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Coco - Winchester Va. on Friday, March 11, 2016 - 05:16 pm:

What a sad tale.

I agree that one should always try to be aware of situation and gravity and momentum.

My Dad had a cotton gin and cattle feed business, and used to get raw products for feed on rail cars. There was a siding, and after the switch engine left, two ways to move a boxcar...a winch and pulley, with an anchor set in a huge block of concrete, or a hand held pry device, don't know what they're called, long wooden handle with a base and a flap, you could lever the car about a quarter inch on level ground, get it rolling.

I remember being told, either way, stand to side of boxcar, so that if things start going the wrong way, you can jump aside.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, March 11, 2016 - 06:57 pm:

David,
That's a car mover, real high-tech name for the tool. They can be a god-send at times. years ago I was in charge of recovering a steam engine from a city park where it had been on display for decades (sad to say, the engine still isn't running, but it is scheduled to be someday). When we were loading up the tools for the project (it was300 miles away) I grabbed on of those, and the Museum Director said, "We won't need that!" and I said, it didn't take up much room and one should be prepared. Well, we cleaned and lubed all the bearings, got the tender disconnected from the engine and laid rails to load it onto the lowboy. The Park had a HUGE front end loader, so we cabled the loader to the tender. RRRRUUUMMM! Nothing happened. Hmm, I holder, "Get the car mover!" and one guy put it under one wheel, and RRRUUUMMM! and a couple of guys pushed down on the long handle---CREEAAK! and the tender started rolling. I heard the Director mutter, "I'll never live this down!" The wheels were just rusted to the rails and the bit of leverage did the trick.
Wayne, My Dad taught me the same thing too!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Coco - Winchester Va. on Friday, March 11, 2016 - 07:43 pm:

David D. , interesting story! The leverage was huge on the low-tech "car mover", on level ground and if you kept busy could get a boxcar rolling well....fascinating if you think of the weight involved...thanks for sharing...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, March 11, 2016 - 10:40 pm:

David D! I had to laugh and chuckle all through your tale! My dad grew up on a cattle ranch in North-Eastern Nevada, around railroad country. I have never held one of those car movers in my life, but he told me lots of stories about them, and how a person that knows how to use one could move a car all around the yard with it. I knew where you were going long before I got there.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eugene Story on Monday, March 14, 2016 - 09:44 am:

my dad used one in the coal tipple to move a coal car to load it evenly, when the retarder wouldn't , let the car role due to coal that had run over the side of the car and got under the wheel it was called a pinch bar


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eugene Story on Monday, March 14, 2016 - 09:50 am:

dad used them in the coal mines to move coal cars, the name they used was pinch bars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eugene Story on Monday, March 14, 2016 - 09:53 am:

dad used them in the coal mines to move coal cars, the name they used was pinch bars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wilson, Saint John NB, Canada on Monday, March 14, 2016 - 10:15 am:

Never used a car mover but had a bad/good experience moving a railway car when I worked at a warehouse in the 60's. Unloaded a car with a forklift and the had to move it out of the way. Gave it a nudge with the forklift and suddenly the car started to roll down a slight incline. I ran to the forward end of the boxcar, climbed the ladder and started wheeling the brake. I wasn't fast enough and the next thing I new, the car hit an open gondola full of scrap steel and I was standing in the scrap. A miracle I wasn't impaled on a piece of scrap, not a scratch on me. Never did that again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Monday, March 14, 2016 - 10:50 am:

At the Chevy plant we used to move rail road cars with our AC HD-6 dozer and later with a Cat 941B crawler loader.Once two of us moved a hopper car by hand and once [I] drailed a car which the rail road had to [frog] back on!! Been there done that! Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole - Castelldefels (Spain) on Monday, March 14, 2016 - 10:50 am:

I don't know too much about trains (although I like them very much) but those wheel brakes seem to take an awfully long time to take hold. I only base this on what I've seen in movies but Dave Wilson's experience seems to back it up too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Monday, March 14, 2016 - 03:28 pm:

Dan,

Thank you for posting this - particularly now that Spring has arrived.

Never be in too much of a hurry to be safe ... :-)



Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, March 14, 2016 - 04:30 pm:

Safety .... hmmmm .... sort of an extension of the natural desire for self preservation, right ?

And that implementation of such actions as to result in said self preservation, ... we'd call that
what ? ..... common sense ?

Let's see, ... to draw a parallel more easily understood by some, WE are a mass of meat. Easily
sliced and diced with sharp or blunt objects. This should be obvious to all but the dullest of minds.

And then we have the perils ... sharp objects, blunt force, large crushing masses, electrical shock,
abrasion, suffocation, asphyxiation ... oh, the list of fun goes on and on !

So let's just play a game here .... meat comes in contact with all of the above, what happens ?

a. laceration, puncture, amputation

b. breakage of body frame, body skin,

c. ....

do I really need to explain this ?

So, why is it that this stuff needs to be explained at all ?

In the military, the phrase "Complacency Kills" was kicked around a lot. People back home would
often say to me "Be careful over there", or "Be safe". I found this ironic. We were going to a very
dangerous place (combat zone) and were highly trained to be as safe as we possibly could, meanwhile
the news stories of drunk drivers killing innocents, home invasions, theatre shooters never stopped.
The guy run over by his own car, the guy who cut his own foot off with the lawn mower .... really ?

And then there is the flip side .... the USG Safety Officer there raising hell that we all wear hardhats
while dropping a 3 ton well house down over the well head. Were the rigging to fail, we'd be pounded
2 feet into the dirt and crushed into an oozing bag of meat and bones, .... but by golly, that hardhat
had better be found in top of that bloody pile !

I am currently arguing with some electrical inspectors over their "rules" book and using their #@!
brains. I have six light fixtures burning 60 watt incandescent bulbs. Basic electrical knowledge tells
us that this will pull 3amps MAXIMUM. The sytem is fed on bare #10 wire, hung on glass insulators
rated at 13kv, with 14 gauge taps in each fixture. Most lamps are fed with 16 gauge.
But by golly, the NEC codebook does not list glass pintype insulators or openwire construction for
anyone but utilities (which NEC does not cover), so therefore it must be unsafe and thereby illegal !

I could light my whole neighborhood this way on a single 20amp breaker and still be safe, but do
you think anyone might engage some common sense ???

Yeah ....

Nothing like using our God-given brains !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 02:13 am:

Burger, some decades ago I was on a tour of a winery that utilizes warehouses built by John Bidwell (ie, some of the oldest buildings around. I was standing in a doorway looking over the building when I noticed they have 4 wire three-phase Knob & Tube wiring in the building--one of the most beautiful installations I have seen--textbook quality. One guy saw me looking and asked, "What's wrong?" I said, "Nothing! I'm just admiring the wiring installation!" For some reason I get the oddest looks at times. . . .
Yes, your installation is way more than safe. Our family resort has its own electrical distribution system, glass insulators & all. One year we had a new guy on the Fire Department checking things out and he was all upset with the lack of insulation on some of the wires. I had to ask him if air is an insulator, yes, he agreed. I pointed out there was 12" of air between the wires. He actually looked it over and came up with a logical conclusion!! That wiring has been there since about 1923, should be safe!
As for moving RR cars, YES, once they start moving they like to keep moving! I know of at least 3 incidence were a car was bumped and started rolling and caused great consternation and some accidents. One incident actually resulted in injuries and major damage to an operating steam locomotive (underway with a passenger train at the time). And those hand brakes don't work so well!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 07:35 am:

Wayne & David my people taught me the same thing Grand-daddy operated a grist mill and would always tell us to stand out of the way when he would replace the the big "slow moving" grinding stones and start them for the first time. I never questioned it I just did it, one day he got a bad set and in the first revolution the bottom wheel came apart... for something that moves so slow the pieces sure went a long way valuable lesson learned stay out of the way! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 12:20 pm:

I always say, if it can happen, it will happen, it likely has happened before and it will happen again. As for trains, I'm sure most of us heard about the accident in a small Quebec town a few years back? A train crew parked a train of tanker cars loaded with crude oil and left for the night. They didn't set enough brakes and hours later, the train crept away. As the brakes faded, the unmanned train picked up lots of speed as it coasted downhill for seven miles. The train crashed into town and blew up, wrecking half of downtown and killing 47 people.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 05:00 pm:

I had a 1 ton truck parked in my small uphill driveway at the place I used live that was right on the curve of a very busy road it was parked for at least a month in the winter one dark foggey rainy nite I went outside I dont know why and saw my truck was gone I thought it was stolen than I seen it was in the middle of the road!the snow melted and the ice under it was enuf for it to slide into the road I dont know how long it was out there but that was as close as I ever came to killing anyone


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