Richardsons Museum 'Transport World' in Invercargill, New Zealand - VERY EARLY FORDS...

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Richardsons Museum 'Transport World' in Invercargill, New Zealand - VERY EARLY FORDS...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Stokes on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 04:04 am:

While I am on the Forum I thought I'd share some exciting news to fellow Ford nutters...

You'll hear a reference to Bert Munro - he was the rider of the world's fastest Indian! He came from the same area.

See a tv news item... http://www.newshub.co.nz/nznews/classic-truck-museum-opens-in-invercargill-20151 12717#axzz42fvVPMRG

The Richardson family purchased the Jim Cooper collection of early Fords and this attraction, with the trucks, is unique in the world. Enjoy this feature item from one of our news stations....

You'll hear the name The Henry Ford mentioned - and a very big claim made - in this clip....

http://www.newshub.co.nz/tvshows/story/transport-world-worlds-biggest-private-ca r-museum-2016030721#axzz42fvVPMRG

Amazingly Transportworld doesn't have a website yet. But the Ford letter cars are there, the third of the Ford-Australia 1963 Quadricycles, and a wonderful Ford V-8 collection.

There's a couple of other incredible auto museums in NZ - it would be fantastic to see some of the folks from this Forum down under to explore them!

Enjoy!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Stokes on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 04:06 am:

Ooops - I meant to add this photo...
Letter Cars


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 05:33 am:

The really beaut part of the collection I saw a few years ago was the fact that most of the trucks came with their history. Story boards told of their owners and the tale of their use in New Zealand. It was still a private collection then, open by invitation. My wife Nancy and I were the only visitors at the time.The fellow who let us in went to the city for a quick visit and left us to it, asking that we pull the door closed if he was not back when we left!
We were still there hours after he came back. I commented that there was a notable omission from the collection, a 1418 Benz. He had the last word. It was in the workshop being re-painted. At that time the place occupied a whole city block.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Sunday, March 13, 2016 - 08:58 pm:

John,

Thanks for posting the information. A little too far to drive but looks like a wonderful museum.

If they don't have a copy of "Pate's Early Ford Encyclopedia" which has Trent's Early Ford Database (serial numbers) and if they would like some help in looking up car serial numbers for the early Fords -- please let me know. Do you know which country most of the C through T Fords came from? [The A was easy -- they were only assembled in the USA.]

And if I am every fortunate enough to get over that way, in addition to visiting some of the wonderful folks who live in that part of the world, yes, I would love to see the museum.

For Rob -- yes, they have a Model K there:



Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin Bicknell on Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 04:25 am:

Here a a couple of the cars from the collection that I saw while they were on display at the Wanaka wings and wheels museum. The '34 was supposedly owned originally by Errol Flyn.1907 K1907K 21907K 3


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin Bicknell on Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 04:36 am:

Here are a couple more34 5 Seater34 5 Seater 234 5 Seater 31907 K 41907 K 5


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 05:15 am:

Justin,

Thank you for the additional photos. I had never seen the 1934 4 seat roadster body before.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 09:57 am:

I haven't either. That is unusual. And I'm wondering why Errol Flynn would have had a RHD car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 12:13 pm:

" I'm wondering why Errol Flynn would have had a RHD car"...So Errol would be closer to the sidewalk and his adoring fans! :-)

Great pictures of beautiful cars. Thanks for posting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Trevan - Australia on Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 12:50 pm:

Re the ERROL FLYNN CAR.
I initially found this car when it came up for Auction in Australia.
I purchased same and passed it on to Jim Cooper.
This car was one of 5 built by FORD AUSTRALIA for an FLYNN movie being made in Australia.
They were constructed by cutting the roof from a coupe for the sole purpose of then being able to put the camera man in the back seat area for close ups of Flynn driving.
2 of the five cars still exist.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 05:35 pm:

Mike, why would the Australian actor not be expected to have a RHD car?

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 09:01 pm:

Why did they need 5 cars for a movie?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Trevan - Australia on Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 11:05 pm:

Maybe Errol was a BAD DRIVER ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin Bicknell on Wednesday, March 16, 2016 - 04:23 am:

Thanks for the update on the '34 Bob. Great to know the correct story.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Trevan - Australia on Wednesday, March 16, 2016 - 05:53 am:

HiJustin.
Maybe if you GOOGLE Errol Flynn movies and find one that was made around Perth in WesternAustralia [circa 1930's] It may indicate it was an action movie that had a vehicle damage risk involved Thus needing back up cars as most movies have in such cases


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, March 16, 2016 - 12:38 pm:

That's what I did, googled Flynn's filmography, and oddly enough the only movie he made in Australia seems to have been a documentary about the mutiny of Bounty and Pitcairn Island in 1933, then he moved to the UK for other movies and soon further on to Hollywood. Can't find any movie where an Australian 1934 Ford would have fit?

http://m.imdb.com/title/tt0024176/reviews?ref_=m_tt_urv

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Errol_Flynn_filmography


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Billy Phillips on Wednesday, March 16, 2016 - 01:16 pm:

The Model K car. The rear end housing dose not look original. I think it should look more like a clam shell housing of 1908.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Wednesday, March 16, 2016 - 02:13 pm:

It's like the one shown in the K Owner's Manual:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Billy Phillips on Wednesday, March 16, 2016 - 02:35 pm:

Jerry: It sure dose. You think they would used this type in 1908, instead of the twelve rivet clam shell.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Trevan - Australia on Wednesday, March 16, 2016 - 04:15 pm:

THE HOUSING IN THE CAR IS CORRECT.

They never used a 12 RIVOT STYLE DIFF IN A ''K''


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, March 16, 2016 - 04:35 pm:

That rubber stem tube looks out of place - Rob, what do original K stems, caps, and dust covers look like? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, March 16, 2016 - 04:40 pm:

Henry Ford was fascinated by the possibilities to shape sheet metal by deep drawing and tried to use it as much as possible when the Model T was developed to make it light. Sheet metal tends to be more flexible than cast, though, since you can't make the drawn parts thicker in areas where they need to be reinforced, Thus some parts were changed very fast, like the hogshead (already in 1908), while the axle halves were reinforced in several steps until the design was back to 1906-08 again by 1915.. The crank case was kept as a deep drawn part throughout production, though constantly changed ;)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Stokes on Sunday, April 03, 2016 - 05:04 am:

Here I am re-visiting the forum after yet another long absence (work must take precedence!).

Hap I am quite certain Richardsons Museum won't have a copy of Carl Pates work but I know they are very interested in finding out as much as they can about their Ford acquisitions. Are you suggesting you may send them one? If so I will dig out a couple of names for you. Perhaps send me a PM.

All these early Fords have an Australian heritage. They were in the Jim Cooper collection in Darwin (Jim, a kiwi, operated at transport company there and this was his hobby) and he recently retired to NZ with his wife, bringing the collection with him.

Bob - a great explanation on the Errol Flynn connection!

Hap - it seems young Rob Heyen is very quiet on this thread. Maybe he is en route to check it out? You could hitch a ride! I think it is high time a contingent of MTFCA folk jumped on and aeroplane and came down under to see some of our treasures (cars and landscapes!).

John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Sunday, April 03, 2016 - 12:57 pm:

John,
I just happen d upon this thread again.

The Model K diff is quite different from the early T version, and even more complex than the NRS version. Dean Yoder rebuilt our differential, and I think he would concur that it is well,mand heavily built. At home I have a photo of the K chassis from the K shown above. I can't imagine how difficult it would have been to keep the underside of a white car (or topside, for that matter) clean, but that would have been the job of the chauffeur. I'll post the chassis pic later. A few K diff innards:






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Monday, April 04, 2016 - 08:29 am:

Rob -- thank you for posting the photos.

John,

Yes, I understand about the “work must take precedence.” And I'm thankful to have a job. I would be even more thankful if I could convince the Benson Ford Archives to open up an Archive Branch in Florida, with a duplicate copy of the 1903-1931 Ford material, and they would hire me to research early Ford questions. I probably have a better chance of winning the lotto than that happening! But in the mean time, I am thankful for all the Early Ford information so many folks share on the internet.

I’ll send you and e-mail ref my offer to look up the serial numbers to see if they are listed in Carl Pate’s excellent book or not. There are two listings. One complied by Trent Boggess – “Early Ford Database” that contains 22 to 24 % of the serial numbers, when the were shipped, and where they were shipped for the 1903- to Model T touring #1114 that was shipped Mar 2, 1909 to Wm. Warnock, of Sioux, City IA. Trent stopped there because the shipping documents cover from #1119 into part of the 1911 year. The other listing Carl’s book contains (actually both are on the CD/DVD that is included with the book) was compiled by John Biggs and covers the Model C, F, and early 4 cylinder cars assembled by Ford of Canada.

For anyone interested in the 1903-early 1909 Fords, I would highly recommend Carl’s book. It is available through the club at: http://modeltstore.myshopify.com/products/pates-early-ford-automotive-encycloped ia-1903-1909

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration