Old Photo - What Six Living Breathing Horsepower Can Do

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Old Photo - What Six Living Breathing Horsepower Can Do
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 10:09 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 10:36 am:

Interesting... There must be more than one "Pine Island, Minn" because the one I know is a long way from Beltrami County.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier Savannah Tn. on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 11:41 am:

A little early photo shop I would think. No way you could make me believe that. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - West Melbourne Florida on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 11:52 am:

I agree, That's a bit of a stretch. If you look close at the strapping that hooks to the whipple trees all that's there is leather straps, Even if the ponies could pull the load the straps could never take the stress.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 11:55 am:

After the 15 mile haul the loggers had dead horse stew! It better be on level ground because I would like to see them stop that load on a down hill run.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III, Hot Coffee, MS on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 11:57 am:

I think not, if you look closely you will see that the horses are engaged fully in the pull, They are all in a hunkered down position due to the weight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 12:14 pm:

yeah right. 1909 photo shop. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 01:26 pm:

No, seriously, guys ....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lance Sorenson, Hector, Minnesota on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 02:09 pm:

This is how they moved such heavy loads. They used sawdust on the hills to slow the sleds down. These pictures were mostly for show and weren't typical.

Notice the barrel for loading the water.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 02:30 pm:

Nearly every county museum in Northern Minnesota and Wisconsin has a photograph such as this one claiming the largest load pulled by a team. The skid trails were iced and as Lance pointed out sawdust was placed on the hills. There were some large loads hauled but I'm thinking this one is a stretch.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 04:29 pm:

I'm not going to get into a pi$$ing contest over pulling teams BUT...A good team can pull 4 times their body weight in dead weight. So one horse weighing 2,400 lbs can pull 4 times it's weight then that's 9,600 lbs or 4.80 tons x 6 horses equals 28.80 tons. That's a far cry from the claim of 250 tons of logs. I don't care if it's on ice or not they still have to get the load moving from a dead stop.

Oh by the way be careful when you are harnessing the team if one of those sob's steps on your foot it's broken and you don't need xrays to tell you that! Don't ask how I know it's embarrassing. Almost as embarrassing as having a Holstein head butt you and break out your front teeth.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 04:58 pm:

What is funny to me that even with the picture over a 100 years later people say it could not have been done!! Once you break the load lose and get it moving it takes little effort to move bob's on ice.Those leather straps are called Tug's and yes they will hold!!! Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 05:34 pm:

Maybe this is one of the horse shoes


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lance Sorenson, Hector, Minnesota on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 07:56 pm:

I did some more googleing about what happens when two horses are pulling the load together? Two horses can pull 36 tons (not just twice the 6 ton load, but six times the normal load)! Now I wonder how much 6 horses could pull? Does it keep escalating?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard E Moore Jr. Pickwick lake Tenn. on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 09:09 pm:

I've driven 6 up and that's not possible.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 10:16 pm:

I carried two jugs of cat litter (and a pack of lint rollers under each arm) from the back of
Costco to checkout today, then carried them out to the truck a similar distance. No photos
to prove it though ....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 11:30 pm:

Yeah! Right! Two jugs of cat litter! Hah!! I was going to bring in a bag of dog food. And I would have too, if my son wouldn't have shown up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James M. Riedy, Sandusky, Ohio on Sunday, March 13, 2016 - 12:02 am:

What you can't see is the TT behind the load pushing. Just keeping it T related. Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Sunday, March 13, 2016 - 12:27 am:

It could have been a downhill haul...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Sunday, March 13, 2016 - 03:48 am:

About 15 years ago, I watched a VHS tape of some Amish moving a large barn. It was loaded using modern conventional structure mover dollies and beams. It was moved over a harvested corn field. I don't know how much it weighed, but I doubt it was anywhere near 250 tons. That being said, the ground wasn't frozen. They pulled it quite successfully with horses, a 32 horse hitch! Quite a show needless to say. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Sunday, March 13, 2016 - 09:54 am:

Just a good thing PETA wasn't around back then! Ability to pull or not aside, gotta kinda feel sorry for those horses anyway...it had to be quite a chore for them. Jim....what're you doing up so late posting!?! LOL...great day yesterday, eh?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Sunday, March 13, 2016 - 10:05 am:

344 people move a barn
http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=People+Moving+a+Barn&&view=detail&mid=593DB6 842B1633219B56593DB6842B1633219B56&FORM=VRDGAR
I wonder how many horses it would have taken?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, March 13, 2016 - 04:29 pm:

You are looking at several factors here ... lifting the object off of a friction-producing surface,
as opposed to gliding the object across a friction-reduced surface, and then the source of inertia
to propel the object in the desired direction to get it moved, which would vary in effort based on
that level of friction vs. none at all.

We use an "air skate" under some impossibly heavy items to produce a tiny air gap between
the object and the floor on which it sits. I can then easily move that object easier than if it were
rolling about on very free spinning wheels. It just glides into place as if weightless and there is
no friction at all.

There is a series of photos taken in Chicago around 1900, where a 12 story brick building was
moved with horse teams to a location several blocks away. It was raised onto rails that sat on
pipe, which then rode on rails, supported by a cribbing that took up the variations in ground surface.
It boggles the mind to think what a 12 story brick building would weigh, as compared to a load
of logs or a barn, but they did it !

Oo-rah !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, March 13, 2016 - 05:22 pm:

At the Chevy plant we had to put sheets of 1/4" plate down to smooth the floor but we floated a 186,000 pound head broach on air bag's!! The hard part was jacking it up high enough to get the bag's under!! Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fritz Hady Mt. Top,Pa. on Sunday, March 13, 2016 - 06:32 pm:

There are about 100 logs on each pile,you would hav e to be pretty gullible to believe that each log weighed 1 and1/4 tons, especially if they are pine which I think they are.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Sunday, March 13, 2016 - 06:53 pm:

Burger, I've seen some photos from that time frame about moving large brick buildings. In all of the ones that I saw that were moved with horses, they were used used to turn winches("windlaces"?), usually using more than one, depending on the size of the building. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, March 13, 2016 - 10:18 pm:

Burger:

The 1910 built Shubert Theater in downtown Minneapolis was moved one block to a new location 1999. It was also re-oriented 90 degrees so the front entrance, which originally faced southwest, now faces southeast. It was the heaviest building ever moved on rubber tires - it weighed 5.8 million pounds. I saw it on one of the days when it was in motion.

Time lapse video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2A71ETuTyxw


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lance Sorenson, Hector, Minnesota on Sunday, March 13, 2016 - 11:53 pm:

Somehow it looks like they moved the sled or changed the camera angle.


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