OT Model T and rumble strips

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: OT Model T and rumble strips
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Moorehead on Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 08:30 pm:

I am sure there is a physical reason for this but I thought I would ask anyhow.
Why when on occasion, when driving a T, does the rumble strip on the side of the road not make all the noise and vibration of a modern car? Is it because of the tire pressure, tire diameter, suspension or what? It seems to make no difference if running 21" tires on our 27 with 32# of air, or the higher 55# on the earlier cars. Or could it be because of the width of the tread? I have never driven over the strips on a motorcycle and kind of wonder what the effect of those tires might be.
Just curious?
Tom


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 08:51 pm:

I'll venture a guess:

IMHO it's because the T, most anyway, does not have any shocks. A modern car's suspension system ( with shock absorbers) is designed to maintain maximum tire contact with the road. Our T's are just not designed that way. When the they were built neither the roads nor the speeds traveled required such sophisticated suspension. Now we need it to maintain control.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Moorehead on Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 09:02 pm:

Sounds reasonable. So I guess the T basically "floats" over the low spots!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 09:34 pm:

I've noticed that a T also takes dips a lot better than a modern car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R. S. Cruickshank on Wednesday, March 16, 2016 - 06:36 am:

Could this also be why if everything is not near perfect in the front end a rail road track will sometimes induce the "death dance"? Just wondering.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Wednesday, March 16, 2016 - 08:08 am:

I do ride a motorcycle. It is not the width of the tires I have hit the rumblers they make a hellava racket when I ride on them!:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer - Arroyo Grande, CA on Wednesday, March 16, 2016 - 11:14 am:

Never gave it much thought.

I just assumed that the normal noise and vibration of the car drowned out any effect of the rumble strips.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Wednesday, March 16, 2016 - 04:45 pm:

I'm thinking it may have to do with the T's light weight. There is a difference in rumble strip sound and feel between my wife's '18 Touring and my Model A Town Sedan which probably weighs another 1000 lbs but the tire size is quite similar.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Wednesday, March 16, 2016 - 05:40 pm:

Tom - Your comment,......"floats over the low spots",.....makes me think of something Sam Hanks (1957 Indy 500 Winner) said once during an interview:

Sometime back in what I'm guessing to be maybe late '40's or early '50's, Sam told the interviewer that when the Indy 500 track was still all brick for the entire length of the mainstretch, Sam said (altho' I don't remember his exact words) that at some speed bellow 100mph those bricks would "shake your teeth out" (or words to that effect) but at some speed over 100mph, it felt "smooth as could be". Sam attributed that to the fact that he felt that at the higher speed, the tires were just sort of floating over the bricks and only hitting the high spots of the bricks. FWIW,.....harold


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