Parade Slow Driving?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Parade Slow Driving?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Perkins on Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 11:03 am:

I have a 1926 Roadster and been asked to participate in local parades. What suggestions are there on how to best drive slow in a parade?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 11:47 am:

If you have Ruckstell or other auxiliary transmission, use the low range. Put the parking brake lever in neutral position and the engine on a fast idle and give a tap on the low pedal to move and a tap on the brake to slow down. You should just be able to keep up with traffic. If you find yourself going too fast, coast a while or wait until there is a space and then move up. Actually a T is pretty easy to drive in a parade if you have a good cooling system and keep the spark advanced about half way.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 11:47 am:

Of course it's helpful for this purpose to have a Ruckstell or an auxiliary transmission with an under drive, but in any event I'd suggest:

1. Be sure your timing is properly set.
2. Be sure your carb is at the "sweet" spot.
3. Be sure your cooling system is working at its best.
4. Minimize, to the extent possible, feathering the low band.
5. Have fun!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie Spokane, WA on Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 12:10 pm:

I am no expert on parades, but I have done a few. I don't think it is a bad idea to install an extra electric fan. Some folks just buy a cheap one from the wrecking yard and run it with a 12V battery stuck in the turtle deck or in the back seat, hooked up with alligator clips and a couple of wires.

I don't run a fan at all on my T, so I avoid parades. However, I accidentally got caught in one once. I will tell you the story.

I like to go to Rendezvous Days in Eureka, MT. Eureka is about 220 miles from Spokane, so I usually just drive my T up there in the morning. I try to get there a little before noon, as that is when the parade starts. So, one year I drove up to Eureka, got there a little before noon, and went to find the T's to hang out with my friends. They were in the staging area for the old cars that were to be in the parade. My intention was to hang out until the parade started, then go somewhere to watch it. I didn't plan to drive in the parade. As the T's were lining up I got ready to take off, when I noticed a blue ribbon hanging from my T windshield. Lo and behold I'd won first prize in the parade! Before it even started! Well, at that point I kind of felt obligated to do the parade. But, with no fan, how to keep the T from overheating? Here is what I did.

The T's were behind the bagpipe band. Bagpipers don't so much march, as saunter. So consequently, if you are behind a pipe band you are going to be going about one mile per hour. So I would shut off my motor, let the parade get ahead 20 yards or so, then jump out and crank up my motor, to the delight of the crowd, then drive ahead another 20 or 30 yards and repeat the process. I did this the whole parade route and had no overheating. Other T's that drove steady were boiling by the time we were done.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 12:58 pm:

Tom, American military bands customarily march at 120 paces per minute, pipe bands march at 112 paces per minute. (Surely someone named Carnegie knew that! :-) )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 03:18 pm:

Running a little on the rich side ought to keep the heat down too, right?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 03:51 pm:

A little rich is cooler than a little lean, but it can lead to fouled plugs if you aren't careful.

Whatever you do, don't slip the Low Band. Engage it. Then disengage it and coast until you need to stop or engage it again. The folks behind you might not appreciate it, but standing still until you have room to actually go somewhere will help, too. In other words, don't try to move up only 10 feet. Wait until you can go 30 (Or whatever).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Williamson - NSW, Australia on Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 04:24 pm:

If the parade route is downhill, no matter how slight the slope, turn the engine off and coast in neutral using the brake to stop as necessary. Be careful not to allow the car to pick up too much speed. Roll for a few metres/yards then stop for a couple of seconds and the repeat.

Oh, and when you run out of slope and need to start, don't forget to turn on the ignition. It can be embarrassing when the car won't start in front of a crowd of people with half a parade backed up behind you and having to get assistance to push the car out of the way. (Believe me, I know!)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 04:47 pm:

It would be beneficial to your Model T if you were to have a chat with the parade organizers and explain to them about how these old cars were not built for stop-and-go traffic, how it's hard on the bands and cooling system, etc. _Ask them to arrange for plenty of side-to-side room so you can continually S-turn from one side of the street to the other, thus greatly slowing your forward progress.

For the sake of the parade itself, it would be good manners to point out to the organizers that the Model T Ford is loud and raucous, so it might not be wise to surround it with the soft voices of the flute and piccolo section. _You'll get along better with the brass and drum players.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 07:34 pm:

Always try to be in front of the horses.
Horsesh** in the tires is no fun.... :-)

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 07:57 pm:

I've done plenty of parades, including those ultra hot Independence Day parades where the driver is hotter than the T, without any problems.

Allow plenty of room to stop. Do not slip the low band. Use the brake sparingly if possible. Is this anything different than we normally do?

They're lots of fun. Don't let anyone talk you out of it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 08:58 pm:

Parades are the only situation where a Model "T" with a poor neutral might be considered a distinct advantage!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 09:49 pm:

Brain storming here but has anyone considered having a powered trailer that could give the car a slight push now and then? Trailer would have a battery driven motor to it's wheels with a controller operated by the T's driver. Saw a bicycle/trailer set up like this once that gave me the idea. Positive thinking encouraged.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Thursday, March 17, 2016 - 10:05 pm:

Gary, I like your outside the box thinking.

But...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, March 18, 2016 - 12:12 am:

You can avoid overheating and delight the crowds by pulling the Model T
along the parade route with a 100 head team of dachshunds.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Friday, March 18, 2016 - 05:45 am:

A parade is no problem if you have a flat tube radiator. I've done them in 95+ degree heat with absolutely no over heating. JMHO. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Perkins / St. Croix Valley MN on Friday, March 18, 2016 - 08:29 am:

I have used my T in parades for over 20 years, perhaps over 100 times. The best advice is simple, just follow Henry Petrino's advice in response #2. That is what I have done, never had a problem even at 97 deg. F. Summer temps.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Andulics on Friday, March 18, 2016 - 08:42 am:

My Fordor has been a parade queen over the last few years. No problems over heating. A heavy car full of grandchildren. Albeit it does have a new radiator core and I run straight water with a bottle of WaterWetter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Friday, March 18, 2016 - 06:43 pm:

So, since thinking outside the box is encouraged here, as I'm building a WWI Light Patrol Vehicle, some of the research I am doing mention slave canisters or condensers mounted on the running boards. WWII jeeps had them mounted on the front grill.

Did any "normal" Model T's run with auxilliary water cooling in addition to the radiator?

Not T related, but my wife just burned out a $600 clutch job on my WWII jeep doing a parade uphill behind a marching band that didn't know how to do either.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Friday, March 18, 2016 - 11:25 pm:

I did a parade once. Never Never again! It moved so slow you could walk around the car as we traveled, no joke. The engine was extremely hot, but I made it through the 3 miles. People did not appreciate the car. They threw candy hitting the car, kids rode bicycles along side the car where I could not keep track of them for a safe distance. I could not wait for it to end and head home! I did it for a friend who asked me. Before it was even over my friend (who was in the car with me) said she would not ask me to do this again......... That alone says something! Never again........

Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, March 18, 2016 - 11:30 pm:

I fail to see the point in car shows and parades. Just drive the car/truck like it's
your everyday driver. Everywhere you go it will be a show or a parade without all
the hassles AND you get your errands done in the process !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Saturday, March 19, 2016 - 12:43 am:

I suppose that the difference between just seeing an old car drive past you versus examining one at a show might be like seeing a book on a shelf versus opening the book and reading it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Saturday, March 19, 2016 - 04:46 am:

Maybe you should ask if you can lead the parade. That way you can set the pace and let everyone else catch up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 01:50 pm:

In the Hilltops of Texas, just get out on a back road and drive! You will have so so much more fun!!! I rather being doing that then a car show or any old parade that no one cares about!

Cheers,
Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 03:15 pm:

I very seldom go to car shows but when I do the show benefits a youth group , church group, old folks home, or VFW. I figure it my way of helping them raise money for their organization. I don't go to please myself but to help others.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 03:24 pm:

Dennis, about the only car show I still do is a local one. They have a "display only" category, so I don't have to worry about having to go home with a trophy. My T has been the oldest car in the show for some years now, and I enjoy talking to people about it and answering their questions. I also especially enjoy people older than I am who start reminiscing about a T that used to be in their family.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 04:21 pm:

You mean there are people older then you! :-) :-)

Shortly after I posted a fellow from the VFW stopped by and gave me a flyer advertising their cruse in and ask if I would bring my cars (a '22 Coupe and a '27 Touring). Then he mentioned a Memorial Day parade and ask if I would bring them down for that. I need to get a hold of the local commander and ask if they have anyone special in the parade that they might want me to ride in one of the cars. The little town I live in has only 800 residents so the parade will only last about 20 minutes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel D. Chicoine, MD, Pierre, SD on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 09:06 pm:

One of my more enjoyable parades was when I had a 92 year old gentleman and his wife as passengers. He had been a tailgunner/radio operator/navigator of an OS2U Kingfisher on the USS Washington in both Atlantic and Pacific theaters in WW2. Unfortunately his memory is severely fading, but his sense of humor remains.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel D. Chicoine, MD, Pierre, SD on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 09:08 pm:

One of my more enjoyable parades was when I had a 92 year old gentleman and his wife as passengers. He had been a tailgunner/radio operator/navigator of an OS2U Kingfisher on the USS Washington in both Atlantic and Pacific theaters in WW2. Unfortunately his memory is severely fading, but his sense of humor remains.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Monday, March 21, 2016 - 04:53 pm:

I've done a few local parades over the years. The main thing I have learned is try not to go on one in an election year. All of the local politicians want to walk the route and glad hand everyone along the way which makes for a LOOOONG ride. One year, several of us got fed up and just drove around them. After that the organizers got after them and it wasn't as bad, but they still slowed it down some. They had slowed down the last half of the parade so much a lot of spectators on the latter part of the route left because they thought it was over. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Monday, March 21, 2016 - 07:09 pm:

Just put both your cast iron Warford and Ruckstell in low and let your T transmission stay in high. That way you can walk along beside your 7.16/1 worm/ring TT .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, March 21, 2016 - 07:39 pm:

George,
If you have a TT with a 7.16:1 rear end, a Warford and a Ruckstell and you use planetary high with the other two in low, you'd need to sink a post to measure movement. The parade couldn't wait long enough. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Monday, March 21, 2016 - 07:47 pm:

In a parade just because you are idling does not mean you need to retard the spark all the way. If the spark is advanced a bit the engine will idle a bit faster and keep things cooler. At least that is the way both my T's and Model A work in slow parades....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Monday, March 21, 2016 - 07:57 pm:

I'm sorry but you folks must realize that we can not call the parade SLOW...To be politically correct the parade is "speed Challenged"


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