How do you wash your Model T ?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: How do you wash your Model T ?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By n maver on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 10:33 am:

I washed the Model T today well if I tell the absolute truth I had the car washed for me,how do you wash your Model T ?

N


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By n maver on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 10:34 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 10:57 am:

Oh my! :-)

I have never "washed" my 1924 cut-off touring (now a pickup). I'm pretty much a wimp and only take it out on paved roads when the weather is clear.

I do occasionally give it a wipe-down with a damp towel, followed by a dry towel. I'm probably putting fine scratches in the finish by doing this, but so far I haven't noticed any degredation (see my profile pic).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 11:01 am:

My TT hasn't been washed since 1946 I'm sure, and probably not for several years before that. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 12:05 pm:

No different than how I wash my modern car - garden hose with a low flow of water and a sponge or a bucket of water with neutral car wash soap and a sponge, followed by a gentle rinse with the hose. After car is cleaned, wipe down car with a chamois, rinsing it in a bucket of clean water.

Always wash a car in the shade.

With a Model T Ford, always take a rag and wipe out the water around the spark plugs when you are finished. Also, open the sidelights and wipe them out.

I wouldn't use a pressure washer with an antique car - you may force water where it doesn't belong. With a Model T, it can even wind up in the crankcase via the breather or via the pedal shaft holes in the hogshead.

Also - with a touring or roadster, wash the car with the top up and don't be afraid to wash the exterior of the top material.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 12:39 pm:

I dust mine.....sometimes! :-) Or! I drive it in the rain...LOL
I get a ribbing about driving mine in a really bad rain storm to a club function, our tour planning meeting.

(Message edited by redmodelt on March 20, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 12:47 pm:

Is there an alternative to driving your T in a rainstorm when you live in Portland ? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 12:48 pm:

I use the 2 bucket method. 1 bucket with soap for washing the car and 1 bucket to rinse the sponge out. I rinse the sponge often, as in I wash one fender and then rinse the sponge. Change the water in the rinse bucket often as well. This way you get rid of most of the dirt in the rinse water and don't re-apply the dirt to the next panel you wash. This also lessens the chance of scratching the paint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 12:51 pm:

Wipe with a towel full of soapy warm water, hose it off, and wipe dry with a towel. Do the washing and rinsing in sections so the soapy water doesn't have time to dry before you rinse.






Normally it's best to wash in the shade, but in this case the early February sun wasn't strong enough to be a problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 12:57 pm:

2 buckets?
Wipe gently?
Worry about scratching?

Not me!
I just wipe it down with WD-40 or Marvel mystery oil - whichever I can find first.
I don't want to disturb the near perfect finish!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 02:31 pm:

When I do wash my truck, I follow Steve's master plan. However, dirt and dust ARE considered
"standard equipment" with a truck and a truck too shiny is not only a shameful disgrace, but an
embarrassment to the truck driving community ! After a winter of work in the shop, the truck is
covered in a heavy layer of fine sawdust and other airborne detritus that a cruising speed of 15mph
might not adequately disperse upon a season's maiden voyage, and thusly may require a quick
wash down to get things adequately squared away. But then again, maybe not. That heavy "barn
find" dust layer is a good look and I think I may just leave it. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 02:38 pm:

On the infrequent occasions when I wash it, I use Steve's method also. I also check the local weekly freebie paper to see if any group of teens is holding a car wash somewhere to support a worthy cause. In that case, I pay them to wash it. Less work and an added good feeling. They usually get a kick of it as well... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 03:04 pm:

Like most of you I use a garden hose and soapy water in the shade and gently mist the water so I don't get water inside but before I wash it I usually open the hood and cover the motor with some plastic to keep water out of the spark plugs and coils.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 03:50 pm:

I only use a hose on mud stuck on or under the fenders. Normally, I just use a bucket of water with the wash and wax you can get at the auto parts store. I wipe it on with a sponge, which I rinse very often. Then I wipe the car with bath towels (I have some especially for the cars, not the ones we use for bathing). This method washes and waxes in one operation. I have been doing this for over 25 years. Never used other type wax or soap on the cars. Of course the cars are in the garage and only taken out for tours, shows, parades, or occasional driving around just to keep them going.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood -Long Beach, California on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 03:58 pm:

I don't wash mine at all, unless there is mud caked on it. I use a "car duster" to get the dust off, and then go over it with one of the spray detailers. The detailer removes fingerprints and water spots and smudges while leaving a nice shine. Takes much less time than washing and waxing and gives great results. If you use detailer before a parade where they want to use blue tape to put signs on your car, the tape will not stick!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 06:36 pm:

"... removes fingerprints ... ?

Oh boy, now THAT is funny ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 07:56 pm:

When we wash our 14 we use water with a cap full of Woolite in the water? The car is now still covered with corn dust but if we get a warm up in April it will be out.I have lived on a gravel road now for 39 years and i avoid mud. Bud in Wheeler Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 08:16 pm:

I wash mine every trip out because they sit under a carport and the get dusty even with California covers. I wet and wash all top surfaces and then the sides. Then I dry. Once a year apply wax. I apply detailer before shows in the area. Not many model A or T shows in my area. I try to drive a model A Or T in the summer at least once a week.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Adkisson on Sunday, March 20, 2016 - 08:27 pm:

Don't forget to blow any water out of the heads at the spark plug recess!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood -Long Beach, California on Monday, March 21, 2016 - 03:09 am:

What? You don't get fingerprints? Nobody touches your car?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Monday, March 21, 2016 - 10:16 am:



My end-of-winter hibernation withdrawal consists of several specific steps including washing the car. _First, the coolant goes back in and we start the engine right up to get the aging puddle of alcohol-infused gasoline out of the carburetor bowl as soon as possible (Today's gasoline is really garbage, it doesn't age well and in the carburetor bowl, it's been separating like salad dressing and evaporating with the remainder turning to sticky varnish). _Then we take the car for a short drive to get the cogwebs out of her system and see that everything is working okay.

Then we change the oil (It's really best to do this at the close of the driving season, but I never know when the last drive of autumn will be, so it works out that the oil doesn't get changed till spring). _It's probably a tad compulsive of me to jack up the front end and waste a quart of oil by using it to "rinse out" the old, dirty oil sitting in the little bulges under the connecting rods, but I do it anyway. _Then I over-tighten the drain-plug, strip the threads and order a new one (It's important to ruin that plug on a Friday evening after business hours so you won't be able to order a new one till Monday and this way, the delivery will be delayed as long as possible—if you're going to screw up, do it right).

During the oil-change, we open the top of the transmission, clean the crud out of the screen and pour the new motor oil in through the top, over the bands. _I've been given to understand it's absolutely imperative that anytime the little transmission door is off, the opening should be covered with a towel so no stray screws or washers can drop in there. For the same reason, it's important that the key not be in the ignition (If there's a way to screw up, I'll find it and really do a bang-up job, but at least where this particular hazard is concerned; so far, so good).

Then we pull the timer housing, clean it and the roller and lube it. _For that, I use anything from WD-40 to 3-in-1 Oil to motor oil.

Then we do a grease job and fill all the little oilers with motor oil (My kingpins are nice and tight, but consequently tend not to drain through, so either 3-in-1 oil or some kind of penetrating oil is best to use there).

With all the dirty stuff done, it's finally time to wash the car. _First step is to gently loosen and flush the dirt off with a garden hose. _Then I use a any decent car-wash concentrate from the local auto store mixed in a bucket with water. _Then we thoroughly hose-rinse and dry the car off with microfiber towels and finish off with Turtle-Wax (except for the brass). _I understand it's best to wax the car in the shade, during the cool of evening.

With all the dirty stuff now done, it's finally time to polish all the brass (I swear by Prism-Polish). _I don't finish the brass with wax because the radiator and lights get hot, of course, and that would cause the wax to melt and cloud up.

Then we top off the battery with a charge and we're ready for the new driving season.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Monday, March 21, 2016 - 10:31 am:

Can someone tell me where I can find one of these?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Monday, March 21, 2016 - 11:21 am:

I follow the method Norman Kling uses. Try not spraying water on the body in order to reduce rust and dry rot. Too many areas on a model T to collect and hold water. The lower fender brackets that bolt to the running boards is a prime example. No salt on the roads where I live.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, March 21, 2016 - 11:49 am:

I use a bucket of plain water with no soap, and a sponge, and a dampened micro fiber towel to dry off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rod Letcher - Eugene Oregon on Monday, March 21, 2016 - 01:04 pm:

I never use water on any of my cars, haven't in over ten years. Most have near show car finishes and get driven on a daily basis and are outside during the days when it doesn't rain. To keep them clean, I use a California Car Duster to remove the dust and if necessary follow that with a wipe down using Detail spray removed with a microfiber towel.
I generally remove micro scratches twice a year followed with a coat of polish and that with a coat of Wax. The cars are kept in a climate controlled garage year round and are never intentionally driven in the rain. It may sound like I'm babying them, or a bunch of garage queens
but not so at all, I just got into the habit of doing this and it pays off,

Rod


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Rosenkrans on Monday, March 21, 2016 - 02:28 pm:

I normally do the duster and detailer route unless its gotten really dirty - then I pull out the hose, bucket, and microfiber towel followed by the detailer. I like Griots Speed Shine. About once every couple years its gets a polish and wax mainly because I like the process. I do use a vinyl protectant on the top and interior regularly, again Griots. I'll also pull the steel spoke wheels for a good clean when the inside surface gets crudy, particularly the rears.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Monday, March 21, 2016 - 02:41 pm:

Mothers has a new product called Waterless Wash and Wax. It has an extreme lubricant surfactant that loosens the dirt and allows a dry micro fiber towel to wipe away the dirt without scratching the finish. A little buffing after and your ready for touring or a show.

I've heard some of the mobile car detail guys are now using similar type products.

I mostly do like Jeff Hood and use a Quick Detailer but I keep my car covered in the garage.

It's a very rare event when you get the hose out for a brass car. No matter how careful you are you'll spray water on the polished brass and make yourself more work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Monday, March 21, 2016 - 03:17 pm:

Every one has covered how the body gets washed so I will just tell how I do the wheels. I jack up the front with a floor jack, sit on a rolling stool and wash each spoke at a time with soapy water then rinse and dry, then do the same in the back.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Tuesday, March 22, 2016 - 03:38 am:

I washed my 26 with a garden hose and got water in the spark plug recesses and soon discovered I had leaking plugs (blessing in disguise)


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