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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Paint forumla info
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 07:33 pm:

By any chance has anyone out there had the pleasure of having the French Gray pinstripe paint made with any of todays paints? Looking for a brand, and formula to have some made up. Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Mills_Cherry Hill NJ on Friday, March 25, 2016 - 11:39 am:

Tim,

Forget how I got there...it always starts a war of the words...

I have always held that the 586 color was too high of a number at Ditzler to be used on a '13. (Ditzler did issue numbers sequentially)

I have always also held that colors were more muddled as were all pre 1920 colors...and my own view was that the Ford pin-stripe French Gray was really Ditzler #16

Here are two Sherwin Williams modern colors...see for yourself how they stacked up against the original Ditzler issues that were re-mastered to remove post production oxides.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Friday, March 25, 2016 - 03:39 pm:

Thanks for that info George. Interesting shade of gray on #16...I always thought the french gray was very light. Theres an '09 on the cover of the Model T Times with what I would bet is considered this so called french gray. Trouble is there seems to be no hard documentation of this color, just a majority opinion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Mills_Cherry Hill NJ on Friday, March 25, 2016 - 04:33 pm:

Like I said, most people are surprised at the truth in these early colors...

What they do not know is color to their parents and grandparents was not only in a different 'pew' than what boomers were taught but in an even different 'church'. Using natural pigments ALWAYS resulted in muted colors and synthetic pigments really did not become economical until the 20's. The 20's redefined some colors and moved them to other base color families...then Crayola came along in 1948 and literally re-wrote the definition book for everything boomers know about color.

However, I also think that the base for a gray in the day would have been White Lead and NOT Titanium Dioxide (Titanium Dioxide then was fairly expensive). Accept that White Lead was the base and you have a whole new ballgame as to folks memories.

White lead would have oxidized 'lighter' over time and eventually almost all of the gray would have just been dirty white. White Lead gets chalky in time.


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