Steering Wheel Screw Hole Stripped

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Steering Wheel Screw Hole Stripped
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By P. Jamison- PA on Sunday, March 27, 2016 - 10:33 am:

One of my steering wheel screw holes is stripped. Any suggestions on a repair? It's a 1924 "Fordite" wheel.

Phil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, March 27, 2016 - 10:40 am:

Use a newer screw to match if the threads are rusted down as many are.

Then ideal place for J-B Weld. Have done it before, works good. Sometimes a bit of a flat style toothpick or other filler wood sliver alongside the screw.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garnet on Sunday, March 27, 2016 - 10:54 am:

You shouldn't be taking any shortcuts with steering wheel repairs. Either put on a different wheel or remove the remaining screws and refasten all in a new position.

Regards,
Garnet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Sunday, March 27, 2016 - 11:20 am:

I think if you put a two or three flat toothpicks with glue in the hole, you should be able to put the original #9X7/8 wood screw back in. Probably what happened is someone tried to put a #8 screw in there, and that is what messed it up. RV sells the correct screws.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Sunday, March 27, 2016 - 10:29 pm:

I just move it a tad and drill Tapp new hole
Steering is no place for a cheap fix


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, March 28, 2016 - 11:09 am:

P.J.,

There are not many things I recommend JB Weld for in a Model T, but in this case it's probably a good suggestion, as Dan describes above. Put the screw & toothpick/s in before the JBW sets up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, March 28, 2016 - 12:46 pm:

this is one of the few places where I would suggest super glue. get some sawdust (the wheel is made of sawdust and soybeans), sprinkle it in the bad hole, add super glue, and before it sets, screw in the screw. After a few minutes remove the screw, then add the spider and tighten the screw in--should be as good, if not better than, as new.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Monday, March 28, 2016 - 06:44 pm:

Prior to using an epoxy putty such as JB weld or Aluminum Devcon, take a Dremel tool and form the hole so that the sides of the hole are angled outward as you get deeper into the hole, so that the bottom of the hole is bigger than the opening. That way, once it is set up, there is no way it can come out. Once it has fully cured, you can drill and tap the hole to the proper thread size. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By P. Jamison- PA on Monday, March 28, 2016 - 06:56 pm:

How does one tap a hole for a wood screw? Can I use a standard tap?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, March 28, 2016 - 09:14 pm:

In plastic, you can "tap" the hole by putting a soldering iron on the screw head alongside the screwdriver, and apply gentle turning motion to the screwdriver. The screw will "melt" its way in, leaving a "tapped" hole.
This is why I recommended putting the screw in while the glue was setting, and taking it out just after the glue sets.
I do a lot of screw hole repairs on toy train locomotive bodies made from plastic.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Monday, March 28, 2016 - 10:05 pm:

P. Jaimison. Fortunately only the head will show so you don't need to use a wood screw. Anyway, wood screw threads are too course for epoxy putty and have a tendency to crack the super hard epoxy putty when tightened the amount necessary to hold. Ford used oval headed wood screws to secure the spider to the Fordite ring. For this repair, drill and tap the cured epoxy putty and use an oval headed machine screw. It will be stronger than the other three. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Albert Lemon on Tuesday, March 29, 2016 - 06:42 am:

Phil, I've done this many, many times and it has NOT FAILED. Stuff the hole with stainless steel wool, not tight. Regular SW will rust and break down in time. If you feel comfortable with your repair, back the screw out a little, maybe 3/4 length of the screw (not all the way) then put a couple/few drops of super glue in the hole. The steel wool is a excellent repair but the glue will make it permenant. IT WORKS !!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Tuesday, March 29, 2016 - 06:59 am:

Nobody mentioned bitumen yet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, March 29, 2016 - 11:39 am:

PJ,

I believe the mention of tapping was done under the mistaken impression that you were referring to the small screw that locks the steering gear cover in place. No, you don't tap a wood screw hole. You can however pre-drill it to a diameter that's just about the same size as the wood screw body, NOT including the threads. This will allow the wood screw threads to engage without the body of the screw wedging in so tight that it breaks the rim in two.


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