Rear camshaft bearing

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Rear camshaft bearing
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By MHal on Monday, April 04, 2016 - 04:00 pm:

Wondering how to remove the rear camshaft bearing (brass) from a 1926 Model T without dropping the engine. I've removed the camshaft and can see the rear bearing but cannot determine how to remove it. Thanks,


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, April 04, 2016 - 04:05 pm:

Why would you like to remove it? If it's worn out, you may want to pull the engine anyway for a full check up?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, April 04, 2016 - 04:20 pm:

MHal,

My dad once ran a tap into the bushing to thread it, (the tap was on the end of a long extension). Then, inserted a piece of thread stock and pulled it out with a slide hammer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By MHal on Monday, April 04, 2016 - 04:28 pm:

Jerry, I like this approach and will give it a try.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Monday, April 04, 2016 - 04:31 pm:

Why do you want to remove the rear camshaft bearing? I would not mess with it unless it shot. Also, if you remove the bushing with the engine in the car how are you going to install and fit the new one?

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, April 05, 2016 - 09:11 am:

Stephen,

You would install a new one the same way you would if the engine were out of the car. A long rod, turned down at one end with a shoulder, so the you can slide the bushing over it then use the rod to insert the bushing and drive it place.

(Might also need some reaming after the press fit.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Albert Belling on Tuesday, April 05, 2016 - 09:37 am:

Interesting: MHal please let us know if it works.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Tuesday, April 05, 2016 - 11:07 am:

Yes, but the engine is in the car. I don't even think it's possible to get the bearing out with the engine in the car much less install and fit a new one.

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Tuesday, April 05, 2016 - 11:09 am:

Jerry, I just re-read your last post. Now I see what you meant.

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, April 05, 2016 - 11:12 am:

Unless you installed the bushing and if it's an original bushing it's not brass. After you threaded it to use the puller you would have all the metal fragments from the thread cutting to clean out.

(Message edited by redmodelt on April 05, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd, ............Red Deer, Alberta on Wednesday, April 06, 2016 - 11:02 am:

An old trick is to use lots of grease on the tap and the bushing to catch most of the cuttings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, April 06, 2016 - 12:21 pm:

RE Ken Todd's grease, I use the same idea when I drill and tap a drain plug in the rear end installed in the car. Leaving the lube in when I drill and tap. The lube carries any chips with it as it drains out. :-) Even if you pre-fit the bushing to the shaft you will still need to ream it after it's installed. Driving it in will mushroom the edge as it's installed. Not much room to work in there and it might as well be a blind hole with the flywheel etc behind it.

Bottom line; go for it! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Wednesday, April 06, 2016 - 03:38 pm:

What can possibly be wrong with the rear bushing/bearing...it is the best lubed and lowest loaded of all. ??? Leave it alone.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Wednesday, April 06, 2016 - 05:05 pm:

I try to stay out of these arguments, but I cant resist this one. John is right. I have done a fair amount of T motors, The first one in 1950 when I was taking auto mechanics in High School. As near as I can figure the rear cam bushing is STEEL at least its not brass. When I am installing a cam I Have never found a worn bushing yet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, April 06, 2016 - 08:37 pm:

I have never seen one of those bushings bad in a runable engine. Damaged by exposure/rust, abuse/hammer, thrown rod? Yes. But an engine that is in anywhere near put-it-together-and run-it condition. Never.
Could that bushing be changed in engine, installed in car? Through the rod/pan cover? I think so, good hints already have been given. For such things, one needs to be creative.
Would such an effort be worth it? Doubtful.
My 2001 "broken-EGGS-pedition" somehow managed to blow a spark-plug out of the head one day (big Triton V8). I managed to Heli-coil the head in place without removing anything not taken out by the plug when it left under power (which included the plug-coil-pack). Do you know how deep the plugs are in that engine? That was over 20,000 miles ago. I did NOT want to have to pull that head!!!
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


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