1914 ford built fire truck

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: 1914 ford built fire truck
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By don ellis on Tuesday, April 05, 2016 - 12:26 pm:

Is this about ford building four of these true? Look at the fire truck. http://www.chapelhillmuseum.org/Exhibits/Ongoing/FireTruck/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, April 05, 2016 - 12:56 pm:

I don't believe Ford made anything beyond the chassis that the fire apparatus is mounted to. Companies like American LaFrance, Howe, Boyer, etc. bought Ford chassis and mounted their equipment to them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Trent Boggess on Tuesday, April 05, 2016 - 01:54 pm:

The closest Ford Motor Company came to producing a complete fire truck were the 10 fire cars that were built especially for the New York City Fire Department. These were essentially 1911 open runabouts with a fire extinguisher and a wood box mounted on the back. They also had simple front bumpers, and were Right Hand Drive. They were unique in this respect.

In the early 1920's Henry Ford learned that George Washington's home, Mount Vernon, had no fire protection. He decided to give a fire truck to Mount Vernon that was based upon a regular Model T chassis. Record's in the Henry Ford Office Papers at The Benson Ford Research Center show that they looked at designs produced by several different firms, but settled on a fire fighting vehicle designed and built by American LaFrance on a Model T chassis (the sales brochures of the companies are in the Henry Ford Office Papers files - and they are in color.

In addition to the buying a complete vehicle from one of the companies that Jerry lists above, it was also common for individual fire departments to buy a Model T chassis from a Ford dealer, then build the body and equip it the way they wanted. My 1922 Fire truck was first purchased by a department near Cleveland, Ohio who built the body on a bare Model T chassis. They decided to equip it with two soda/acid chemical tanks. About 1928 the Cleveland area fire department decided to sell their Model T fire truck to the fire department in Birmingham Township in Lorain County, west of Cleveland. It served the township for many years, and was present at many of the famous fires in and near the township for about 10 years. It was then decided to raffle off the fire truck after removing the fire fighting apparatus in the late 30's.

The raffle was won by a Birmingham resident who had no idea of what to do with it, and so sold it immediately for $50. It spent the next 20 years powering a buzz saw until being acquired by my first Model T mentor. About 15 years ago, it was bequeathed by him to me. It has been returned to pretty much the way it looked when used by the Birmingham fire department.

Respectfully submitted,

Trent Boggess


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Tuesday, April 05, 2016 - 01:56 pm:

This is one example of Fire trucks build by other firms on Ford Chassis.

Ford / Howe Model T Pumper. 1918. The Howe Fire Apparatus Company adapted its fire pump and booster tank to a Ford Model T chassis for several hundred of these modest little pumpers for the U.S. Army in World War I. This one went as surplus in 1920 to the volunteers of Germantown, Illinois, where it saw service until 1956.

http://www.hallofflame.org/December%202012%20Photos/1918%20Model%20T%20Ford%20Re sized%20for%20web.jpg


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By don ellis on Tuesday, April 05, 2016 - 09:17 pm:

My job is taking me about twenty minutes away from this one tomorrow so I may have to take a detour. The equipment manager for chapel hill fire has contacted me about getting it running for parades and teaching them how to drive and care for it. Looking forward to it


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, April 05, 2016 - 10:23 pm:

Don,
when I repaired the Chester Fire Department's Model T Chief's car, I wrote out an annual check list and service directions. Fire departments are used to following documentation. Looked around on this computer, but couldn't find it--think it was on my computer that died; rats, i was going to send it to you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By don ellis on Tuesday, April 05, 2016 - 10:53 pm:

That's a good idea, I think I will do that. Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Wednesday, April 06, 2016 - 08:34 pm:

Trent,

This isn't a fire vehicle but do you have any information on this little truck?

It has a Michigan Manufacturers License plate assigned to Ford on it. Michigan 5005M. That plate is seen often on photographs of new Ford cars.



Seems to have the short billed early 1913 front fenders on it. I thought I saw it in another thread but can't find it.

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Trent Boggess on Wednesday, April 06, 2016 - 08:44 pm:

Ken,

This is a well known photo, but I have never seen the provenance on it.

It appears to be a late 12 early 13 car, judging by the fenders and the black and brass side lights.

I can't tell you more than that.

Respectfully submitted,

Trent Boggess


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Wednesday, April 06, 2016 - 09:24 pm:

The cases on the dock behind the car are labeled "Detroit Motor Car Supply Co.". Seems to have been associated with Wadsworth Company that supplied some of the sedan bodies to Ford.

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By don ellis on Wednesday, April 06, 2016 - 10:16 pm:

Went and checked it out today, it is a 14 but it has a 15 engine. The headlights were converted long ago as they were present in the old photos. I had looked at it for a while when I realized it was a wide track. The wheels need rebuilding but all in all its a nice truck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By don ellis on Wednesday, April 06, 2016 - 10:49 pm:

Here's a photo


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Wednesday, April 06, 2016 - 10:57 pm:

Don,
Also 15/16 hood and fenders, later square felloe wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Thursday, April 07, 2016 - 12:16 am:

The only thing 1914 I see is the side lamps.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By sohail khan on Thursday, April 07, 2016 - 06:10 am:

That is just an unfortunate coincidence to find this Ford built fire truck.
www.mountainwesttrailer.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By don ellis on Thursday, April 07, 2016 - 07:48 am:

The reAr wheels were round felloe and the rear axle is 14 style, but it did have slick pedals. Engine cast date was late 15, it may be a early 16. I couldn't get around the rear of it but the rear axle looked to be standard width, probably changed out


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Killen on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 09:54 pm:

When I gathered material for "Firefighting with Henry's Model T", I had several discussions with Chief Dan Jones, Chapel Hill Fire Department regarding this truck. This was Chapel Hill's first motorized fire truck, one of the first motorized fire trucks in North Carolina. Chief Jones stated this truck was purchased through the Ford dealership in Chapel Hill for $600 and was one of seven built of that particular model. It is believed a private company built this truck. After several hours of study and examination, we are reasonably certain it was not built by any of the major fire apparatus manufacturers who were using the Model T Ford chassis for fire trucks. A number of fire trucks built on the Model T Chassis were registered when the truck was delivered opposed to the year the chassis was made. My 1920 Obenchain-Boyer is a good example. The Model TT chassis was built July 13, 1920 and the Hale fire pump was shipped in August, 1920. The truck was driven from Logansport, Indiana and delivered to the Village of Chittenango March 28, 1921.


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