Got Call for a Movie

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Got Call for a Movie
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By T Thompson on Saturday, April 09, 2016 - 11:54 am:

I got a call to use my car in up-coming movie... The requesting source is someone I trust.

Just curious who has experience with this? Pros / Cons?

Thanks!

Trevor


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, April 09, 2016 - 12:23 pm:

I had an acquaintance that had his 56 Pontiac Star Chief convertible plowed through
a brick storefront by an actor that was whacked on smack. The production company
did their best to obfuscate responsibility and it took him YEARS of his own time and
money to put the car back together again. I have also known others who had no issue
at all. Some times they were just asked to drive their own car through scenes during
filming.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Saturday, April 09, 2016 - 12:32 pm:

Well if they rent it they do whatever they want with it
Breaks or damage they don't care they will probly write you a check and leave you the remains
We had a model A in a movie once they sprayed some crappie all over it make it look dusty took dozen washes to get it off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Timothy Kelly on Saturday, April 09, 2016 - 12:33 pm:

I have no personal experience with the matter.

However, a friend of mine had an original paint 1920s automobile. He agreed to rent the car to a production company. The contract covered all the bases, including the fact that the production company agreed not mess with the original paint.

When the car was returned to him he was stunned to note that his car was sporting a new Earl Scheib paint job. He complained and pointed out the fact that the production company agreed not to touch the paint. Their response was, sorry, we'll have it repainted again for you to match the the original color.

I have had other friends who have had great experiences.

If believe that if I were to ever get involved in movies no one but me would drive the car, and I wouldn't leave it unattended.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Saturday, April 09, 2016 - 01:11 pm:

It's simple. If they rent the car, they also rent you.

Anyone who hands over their car to relative strangers and expects to get it back in the same condition is asking for it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - West Melbourne Florida on Saturday, April 09, 2016 - 01:14 pm:

I took my T to a production of Buck Rogers the Early Years. Erin Gray and Gil Gerard were there and acted as if I was doing them a favor buy having my car there. At one point some dude started yelling at my wife for taking a pic of my T in one of the scenes. That guy real quick found out from me how to address my wife next time he talked to her. During one of the scenes the young actor jumped on my running board I thought the car was going to flip over. I mentioned it to the manger and was told that was how the shot was made and they needed to make a couple more retakes in the morning. I took my car home that night. They had no respect for my car at all. Its funny, They were mad at me for leaving them. My suggestion, Don't go, Its not worth it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Saturday, April 09, 2016 - 01:15 pm:

In 1998, NBC filmed a miniseries "A Will of Their Own" in the St. Louis area. It was about women's suffrage, so there were 1914-1924 scenes and several of us from the Model T club participated. In my case, it was a package deal. They paid me for having the car in the film and they paid me for driving it. (The car made more money than I did.) I don't think I'd have been too happy about leaving it with them and then picking it up a few days later.



One nice thing was that the guy in the production company who was responsible for vehicles insisted that his drivers - even those of us who were technically extras - eat with the cast and crew rather than the other extras. We ate better that way. And besides, how often do you get to stand in a food line with Lea Thompson?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Saturday, April 09, 2016 - 01:27 pm:

" Obfuscate "

1. To make so confused or opaque as to be difficult to perceive or understand: "A great effort was made ... to obscure or obfuscate the truth" (Robert Conquest).
2. To render indistinct or dim; darken: The fog obfuscated the shore.

I learned a new word today .... :-)


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Saturday, April 09, 2016 - 02:08 pm:

Many of us here in SoCal have had our cars at the movie shoots. I have not heard anyone with issues about damage to their cars. If there were any downsides it would be the amount of time you have to spend at the site waiting for something to happen. Make sure you bring a chair and a lot of patience. You'll have to get there early and will leave late.
Dick is right, as a "Driver" you are entitled to eat ahead of the extras and with the cast and the food is really what everyone says. Unbelievable!

The pay can vary a lot but if you're listed as a driver you're on the clock and entitled to many addons like worked past lunch time and OT and other perks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Saturday, April 09, 2016 - 03:23 pm:

I haven't any personal experience with this, but around the cake and coffee at car club meetings, horror stories abound of the abuse, damage and even welded-on modifications inflicted upon antique cars by movie studios. _The relative pittance they pay for renting irreplaceable historical vehicles is just not worth the time, trouble and risk involved. _But hey, if the great, big $400 payoff were to be any kind of lure an owner, he might be well advised to refrain from leaving the car unattended in the care of the studio. _As Dan pointed out, that's just asking for it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, April 09, 2016 - 04:10 pm:

The problem with this question is that there are many varieties of Production companies: real pros with money behind them to two-bit "fly-by-night" guys with a shoestring budget. I think I would stick to major studios. I've had my car in two movies with no mishaps, although there was one close call when my car was parked and they did a chase scene past it.
OTOH I worked with a video company, best fits that last description, not with cars, but with my toy trains. I ended up with two bit parts, one speaking in it, and did some illustrations for it to (it was about the history of trains from a kid's standpoint--the film was "Itgo & the Time Trains"). Well, some damage was done to the toy trains (I made certain I only lent them easily replaceable stuff) and a lantern globe was broken (that one was hard to replace). I was supposed to get credits and a percentage too. I went in with eyes open, so when I never got anything but my name (But Dave instead of David) in the credits, I considered it an interesting experience. Nope, no SAG, not even an honorarium. I did buy a copy of the tape when I found it at Walmart.
The fun part was when I played the Steam Locomotive engineer; that part was shot at the California Railroad Museum, and the engine was hot. Once the crew figured out I knew enough about steam locomotives to not do something stupid, they let us have the run of the engine--not something I would have done if I were on the museum crew (I would have at least stood by, just in case). The funny part was the kid actor, who was a "professional" kept blowing his lines and I'd have to ad-lib to keep the conversation close to the script! The Director actually thanked me for "thinking on my feet" on that one.
So, your experience may vary--and a LOT depends on the the Props manager; I would definitely be "on set" the whole time, and be the driver if at all possible. Just make certain they understand that You're the boss on how your vehicle is treated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer - Arroyo Grande, CA on Saturday, April 09, 2016 - 09:55 pm:

Movie studios used to film in and around my parent's neighborhood in Newhall, CA. Most of their experiences were OK, but a few were not. I was present once when a stunt man repeatedly drove a fake CHP car though the circle drive for a car chase scene. Scared the cr#% out of me !

On another occasion, my folks agreed to allow a commercial shoot in which John Deere lawn tractors would be driven on their lawn. Turned out the studio showed up with the entire line of JD tractors, some weighing many thousands of pounds. Needless to say, their nice lawn was in shambles and the sprinkler system was destroyed. It took a lawyer to straighten that one out.

My view is that any studio wanting to use my car or any other property for a shoot will have to agree to a two-stage payment. First stage would be a fixed amount, paid up front. The second stage would be a one million dollar cashier's check, made out to me, also up front. I would return the check after the shoot if there was no damage done. For any damage done, I would cash the check and retain that part that I felt "made me whole". Then return whatever was left over of the million.

Don't like my deal ? Find some other patsy.

Dick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Saturday, April 09, 2016 - 10:51 pm:

I have had cars in Five movies.
In The Masters I had three cars in some days.
It turned to be 1050 dollars a day when they used all three cars.
You have to know the movie car guy.
He is the one that will make sure they don't do any damage to your car.
This past January I was hired to drive cars in the Bruce Lee movie, Birth of the Dragon.
They did not want any of my cars. The movie car guy said he wanted me to drive because he felt comfortable having me drive anything and anywhere without any worries.
About ten years ago an onlooker keyed the full length of one side of a Maxwell. The movie co. Paid the owner five grand to get it taken care of.
In the same movie I got an electric fuel pump and installed it on a '32 Ford pickup during nighttime filming and I got a model A headlight bulb for an important car that was being filmed that night. They gave me an extra 250 bucks for my effort.
If you have a real nice or very exotic car and don't know the movie car guy I think you should pass on the job.
The usual pay for a car is 300 or more per day.
A rare car that they really need can bring five hundred a day.
Right now I am hunting for an early Falcon Club Wagon.
A first series Econoline with windows.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Severn - SE Texas on Sunday, April 10, 2016 - 01:01 am:

I have only done one movie. It was a single day shoot, took about half of the day and everything went well. No complaints. And the actress wasn't bad either.

Bill

Movie shoot


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Loving on Sunday, April 10, 2016 - 01:02 pm:

My wife & I along with our '23 Roadster were "background" for "Live By Night" with Ben Affleck, filmed in Boston & Lawrence last November.
It was a great experience, lots of fun and fascinating to see how a movie is put together. We were there for 10 days long days. We had to be on the set @ 5:30 every morning and didn't finish until the street lights came on.
The food was great, full breakfast every day, lunch the 1st day was Lobster tails!
Their favorite word is "reset", meaning back up and do it over again.
Both Ben & Sienna Miller were friendly and spoke to us.
If you have the opportunity, go for it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Sunday, April 10, 2016 - 01:40 pm:

Like Aaron, I was also in a movie where they didn't want my car, but needed drivers. The local old car guy they were working with to get cars and drivers knew me and asked if I'd be interested. The movie was "The Game of Their Lives," about the American victory over the British in the 1950 World Cup Soccer match. Since it took place in 1950, all the cars were late forties through 1950. I remember driving a 1950 Dodge around a block in downtown St. Louis for hours. I had forgotten how many turns from lock to lock forties and fifties Mopars took. Really good exercise for my arms.... :-)

As Dave says, I found it really interesting to watch how the movie was made from a vantage point right on the set.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris from Long Beach, CA on Sunday, April 10, 2016 - 03:15 pm:

Don't worry, nobody on a set will know how to drive a T


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Sunday, April 10, 2016 - 04:08 pm:

In 1992 I was asked to have my Model TT Hucksters truck in the movie "King of the Hill". It was there, my family and I went there to keep an eye on it for the day. My one son was asked to be a stand in for one of the actors in the film. The other was used as a "street urchin" for the depression era story(1933). I was in the crowd as an extra. It was a fun and unique experience that we talk about quite often.
I had lunch, which was fantastic, with Karen Allen, Who was in the film.
I would say do it if you have the time and can stay with the cat for the time it is there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Warren on Sunday, April 10, 2016 - 04:18 pm:

Dad and I were in a movie called Lucky Chances with Sandra Bullock, They rented some of our old antique equipment, forklift,fuel truck,service truck. We went through wardrobe and had to operate the equipment. We were paid $2.00 dollars a day, but the equipment made several hundred dollars. It was a fun experience, at the time (1990) Sandra was new to acting. We were always invited to eat with the cast. You can still watch it on you tube, we are close to the beginning at a construction site I operated the forklift handling a cube of blocks and my dad Elden was driving the 1940 Chevrolet fuel truck, then close to end Dad ran his service truck and I ran a lift. I would love to meet her again some day :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, April 11, 2016 - 01:34 am:

I have had a few brushes with such things, although never with my car on film. I have helped with friend's cars, provided my own wardrobe for a walk-on, and met a number of interesting behind the scenes people. It IS fun for us outsiders to get to watch the making of films, commercials, etc.
Millions of people the world over got to see my "better side". In full era garb, me, bending over looking through the view finder lens of a vintage camera on tripod. The audience got a nice view of what I was taking a picture of while I "mooned" the world.
A fair segment of a show, they never showed my face.

Sometimes, you do get to meet the stars. Also, sometimes there is what may be a downside to that.
Same production as above. My wife got to meet a "star"/"personality" that Linda had admired for several years from several TV shows. I won't say who it was, but she may seem bright and personable on TV. However, up close? Not so much.
I know that to some extent, it is a necessary part of the job. But it was like her face was on a switch. One of the unfriendliest people I have ever met. Personal staff always within arm's reach, fawning over her, detailing every hair on her head. At "roll 'em" like flipping a switch. She changed completely, gaze, body language, everything. Personal staff stepped barely out of camera angle. As soon as the scene is done, director hollers "CUT" and somebody flipped the switch again. She is off to the side somewhere, personal staff working on her like spider monkeys.
Linda never liked another show that she (this particular "star") was in. She also pretty much faded in her career overall after a few more years. I suspect a lot of people didn't really like working with her.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Monday, April 11, 2016 - 01:59 am:

I found most to be very nice people.
Perry Como was especially a nice, cheerful guy.
Gabriel Mann was very friendly with all the extras and to me and my daughter who was about 10 at the time.
Some stars sit around drinking while waiting to be filmed and then get nasty if you say anything about them being drunk.
We had one guy who came to the set drunk.
They told him he could not drive in with the early 30's Buick, they would let him steer it but the motor would not be running and they'd have a couple of guys push it instead of running the engine.
He got pissed and there was a scene.
Joaquin Phoenix greeted us but was not sociable otherwise as far as I could tell. He pretty much stayed away from everyone.


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