Question about wood restorer

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Question about wood restorer
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Douglas Keppler on Monday, April 11, 2016 - 07:08 pm:

Has anyone tried that Kwik-poly filler that Langs sells? My wood tack strips are pretty solid but have many holes from many nails over the years and some chunks of wood missing here and there. just wondering if the stuff is worth it


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Monday, April 11, 2016 - 07:16 pm:

Yep, I was first introduced to it by Joe Bell and was I glad he did! Great stuff. Literally thousands of uses, and makes for great spoke tightening if they're not too far gone. I've used them on the tack strips too, as well as doors. Get it! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eyssen - Abilene TX on Monday, April 11, 2016 - 07:35 pm:

YES---used it to tighten my 14 body-- follow directions 'cause when it starts to set, it SETS.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Monday, April 11, 2016 - 07:36 pm:

Yep great stuff...when the grandchildren get out of line I just Kwik-poly them to the floor!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Monday, April 11, 2016 - 07:48 pm:

Douglas,

If you have not read the Kwik-Poly directions etc. they are available on their web site at: http://kwikpolyllc.com/

There is a great discussion at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/315987.html?1350271143 ref Kwik-Poly and other wood options you may want to consider.

If you wood in the the tack rail is still good, you can easily fill the tack holes with wooden round tooth picks dipped in Elmer's waterproof wood glue or other similar product.

The Kwik-Poly does set up quickly. And if your surface is vertical that you are trying to fill -- it tends to run off very easily. If your body is off the car you could easily turn it so the Kwik-Poly ran into the wood rather than off of the wood. Or if you can easily remove the tack strip? you can apply a little Kwik-Poly at a time. But whatever you mix up hardens at the same time so only mix what you can easily use at one time.

For a small area that the Kwik-Poly could be brushed on and it would run down into it -- I would recommend it. But for the larger areas and also vertical areas, I did not figure out how to get it to go where I needed it to go. Of course I only used it once so the next time I'll have a better idea of how to use it.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Monday, April 11, 2016 - 07:58 pm:

I have never used it on my car because my '26 coupe has no wood, but I have used plenty of a wood restorer made by Abatron on the exterior wood of my Victorian house.

Wood restorers are water thin epoxy solutions that are absorbed deep into the wood and then cures into a hard plastic that makes the wood as strong as it originally was. It is especially useful for stabilizing complicated dry rotted or mushy wood pieces that ordinarily could only be made by a professional wood worker with specialized tools.

When you use Kwik-Poly, or any wood restorer epoxy such as Abatron Wood Restorer (www.abatron.com), be sure to mix more than you need in anticipation of using as much as possible. Paint it on over and over again until it can't absorb anymore, then paint on more just in case it is not done absorbing. This is to allow as much to absorb into the wood as possible, for once it starts to set up you will not be able to put any more on. If the wood piece is small enough, allow it to soak in the solution to absorb it that way, but don't walk away from it for when you get back, you might return to a clear block of wood restorer encasing your piece of wood. Jim Patrick

PS. Abatron also has a fantastic 2 part epoxy wood filler that I highly recommend.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Monday, April 11, 2016 - 09:22 pm:

Kwik Poly is good stuff and has it's place. If you want something with more work time, try West System. They sell colloidal silica as a separate component that you can add as a thickening agent to make it up to the consistency of peanut butter. It's nice to be able to have some control over the product, particularly if you're working on an assembled car where you don't want the risk of inadvertently gluing together other components in the process. If find that Jamestown Distributors usually has the best prices going.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Monday, April 11, 2016 - 11:42 pm:

Been using it for at least 15 years
Works great tighten a loose wheels model T and horse drawn fill in wood bows and tack strips gas tanks sealer even sealed cork floats
I also use it on steering wheels and then paint them
Wood and soybean
Only thing this stuff hates is water and oil unless is has been set and hard that's about 3 to 5 miss
It's two part 1 to 1 mix like water
Won't say it's the best thing since beer but is as good as sliced bread


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - 12:54 am:

I use it for the wood in the T and our farrier uses it for hoof repairs! Great stuff!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - 02:27 am:

I used it on the ends of some wood in my window frames in my house that had been exposed to water and over time had started to get a bit "dody", as we say here. Worked great! Saved a bunch of work and expense. The nice thing is the shelf life is almost indefinite as long as everything is kept dry. I've had this kit for over ten years. Great stuff as far as I'm concerned! Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Phillips on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - 02:37 am:

I have been trying to get some of this stuff for several years but doesnt seem to be available in New Zealand - does anyone down here know f a source.?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - 03:35 am:

In NZ you might have to use the boat builder alternative, Can't recall it's name but i saw it on a shelf along with the other epoxies.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - 04:50 am:

Kep - not sure if this might help, but many, many years ago, and I'm guessing now, but I'm sure that I'm talking maybe as far back as 30 or 35 years ago, I saw, advertised in magazines (maybe Popular Mechanics???) some stuff called "GIT ROT" or something like that, maybe all one word, not sure of spelling, but anyway, I'm thinking that at that time, it was meant for repair of dry rot in wood boats. FWIW,....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - 09:34 am:

Harold, you are correct. Not sure if they still make it, but it's good stuff too. Used it all the time on my wooden boats back "when".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Hoops - Burton,Texas on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - 09:34 am:

Back in 1999 we bought a new low priced motorhome. (We only kept it for 2 years.) All of the cabinet doors were made of particle board and most of the hinges and other hardware kept pulling out. I repaired all of this with Kwik-Poly and it worked great for me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - 10:28 am:

Keep your Kwik Poly in the freezer, it slows the set up time to be able to brush it or whatever.

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - 10:31 am:

Douglas,

If it hasn't been mentioned above already, Kwik Poly is really not a filler. It is a really thin "epoxy-like" stuff that will seep into rotted or porous wood or thin gaps and then harden, giving the wood new strength and density. It is not the best for filling bigger gaps. If you want to fill nail holes, pound some toothpicks into the holes before Kwik Poly. As for the missing chunks you mention, Kwik Poly probably would not help.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Albin Werner on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - 10:42 am:

worth every penny! ... used it on my 25' doors (wood) could NOT believe the results .... and now have used on the felloes .... two of which were "stressed" to say the least .... I could see the ends literally soak-up this 'stuff'


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - 10:46 am:

I use Elmers Glue and tooth picks to fill nail holes. Let them dry overnight and then clip off using diagonal cutting pliers. Sand smooth with a die grinder / sanding disc.

Not much work. Great results.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale L Myers on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - 10:57 am:

Here is a link to an older discussion on the subject.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/315987.html?1349705192


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Douglas Keppler on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - 11:04 am:

thank you everyone for the input. Hey Royce is that a little tire ashtray I see in that photo?


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