Having a hard time removing tire from demountable (not a split rim)

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Having a hard time removing tire from demountable (not a split rim)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Blanchard on Monday, April 18, 2016 - 11:56 am:

So I woke up this morning to a flat on my T... I pumped air into the tire and found the leak (base of the rubber stem) luckily I have a real spare!

Switch the tires (I need to adjust low speed bracket again today so I need to drive the T) and proceeded to man handle the flat tire.
Took some doing but I got the first lip out (tube no air) and found that the demountable didn't have the flap.

So does one need a flap for a demountable (not a split rim)?

Also why is it so difficult to remove the tire from the rim?

I ask because I am going to eventually replace all the tires and tubes (I have two separate manufactures of tires on the car and want them all to be the same) and it seems like I am going to have a hell of a time removing 5 tires from their rims in the near future.

Is there a video to show how best to approach changing tires on non split demountable?

Thanks in advance for any help...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, April 18, 2016 - 12:07 pm:

Hot sun, sweat, good set of tire irons and take your time. :-) The rims are called clincher (that's what the correct name is) and for good reason. Once they are on boy do they clinch the tires when you are trying to change them.
With modern made tires I say yes to the flaps. The modern tires don't come together in the center like the old tires. Leaving a gap that the tube wants to migrate into when installing them causing a pinched tube and maybe a flat.
Break the bead both sides all the way around before you start. The hot sun helps soften the tires making them easier to remove and install.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, April 18, 2016 - 12:13 pm:

It is sometimes easier to remove the tire with the wheel on the car. You need to let out all the air and then try to push the tire away from the rim at the bead. Sometimes a jack will help here. There used to be a tool which would pinch the tire to push it away from the rim, but a jack over the tire and under something unmovable can be used to break the bead from the rim. Once you get it loose in one spot, you can more easily break it all the way around. Then start next to the valve stem working with your tire iron. to move the tire above the rim. Two or three irons work better than one. You can keep an iron under the edge of the tire so that it doesn't drop back onto the rim and work around the tire. Two sets of hands work easier than one, but one person can accomplish it. It is also easier to do in hot weather. So setting the wheel out in the sun for a while before working helps too.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Bishop, San Diego on Monday, April 18, 2016 - 03:23 pm:

Hi Norm,
I noticed the weather is hotter in Alpine than downtown San Diego today. Can I leave my flat tire in your driveway in the sun to soften it up, and then pick up the changed tire tomorrow??? :-) It's only flat on the bottom, so the rest of it should be OK!
Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Monday, April 18, 2016 - 03:36 pm:

If you are taking tires off and are going to replace/throw out, a saw is a timely tool to dismount. A hack saw can be your best friend! :-) I take my time with Model T tires. They can wear you out and be very frustrating even with the correct tools.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Monday, April 18, 2016 - 05:29 pm:

Just take a hack saw and cut them off. Then cut them in quarters and the trashman will take them'


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, April 18, 2016 - 05:30 pm:

Be careful not to saw into the rim, or you'll be firing up the Mig welder and files to repair the saw slots! Don't ask me how I know.... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Blanchard on Monday, April 18, 2016 - 05:57 pm:

That is a good idea to cut them off.... but since I have never done a T tire change I want to practice some... Plus I want to keep a few of the tires as emergency spares...
I need to buy better tire irons.. the ones I have are to short, I need the leverage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rod Barrett - Anderson, IN on Monday, April 18, 2016 - 07:42 pm:

It just so happens that I just changed 5 tires on my demountable Depot Hack. Here is how I did it:

Purchase two 24" tire irons from Harbor Freight. Remove your demountable and place it on a work bench or tall table. Remove the air from the tire. Starting furthest from the valve stem, insert the smooth end of the tire iron all the way through both tire beads and pry both beads off of the rim. Insert the second iron about 20 degrees from the first iron and repeat. The idea is to remove both beads at the same time until the tire pops off of the rim.

Next insert a new tube into the new or old tire. Inflate just enough so the tube inflates without expanding the tire. Place the tire and valve stem into the hole in the rim. I did not use flaps as I don't believe they are needed on demountable rims. Take a ratcheting strap and place it around the tire and rim next to the valve stem. Tighten the strap while working both beads into the rim. Using only your hands, work both beads into the rim until you have about 30 percent of the tire mounted. Place the hooked end of the tire iron between the rim and the tire and slide it toward the valve stem. Now pry both beads onto the rim. While holding that iron, repeat the process on the opposite side of the rim. It should only take about 3 or 4 of these steps to mount the tire.

It should be noted that I have seen the videos of installing a tire with a plastic bag. I decided not to try this method. Last year I changed one tire on my Tourabout and it took nearly all day. By the last tire on my Hack I was down to about 10 minutes.

YMMV


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, April 18, 2016 - 09:40 pm:

I like Rod's method better than mine!
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By clyde minges on Monday, April 18, 2016 - 10:20 pm:

send mew your tire and I will change it for you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philippe BROST, France on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 06:26 pm:

I use a lot of soap, on the rim, on the tire and on the tire iron. The soap will not damage the rubber.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 07:45 pm:

If the tire has been on the rim for a long time I place it in a large vise and squeeze the rubber together just next to the rim and then rock it back and forth so it breaks the rubber loose from the rim. Then you can insert your tire tools to remove the tire.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Blanchard on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 10:01 pm:

Rod, thanks for the write up! Will try it your way... No sun today so waiting till tomorrow to heat up the tire... Only playing with the flat for right now since I am waiting for the tube to arrive...
I will be ordering my tires next month.


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