One Ton T Truck thats not a truck what about a two ton T truck

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: One Ton T Truck thats not a truck what about a two ton T truck
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Monday, April 18, 2016 - 10:04 pm:

When it comes to breaking the rules in Model T Ford law Australia along with Canada is way ahead of the game.

When researching some history a research group has come across the following mention in a newspaper column in Adelaide South Australia . Duncan Motors always gave their sales figures to the papers and amongst them was this paragraph.
DM 05

Another entry from the Queensland papers states this.
qml

Add to that an advertisement showing the features of the Two Ton Truck ( does this make it a TTT truck?)
ad specs

These type of add on's for Ford chassis were common and available for many years especially the chain drive variety for normal car chassis.

At this time (1925) the Ford distributors were still importing and assembling Ford cars and trucks, so for them to also add a Ford Extension kit to their range to gain extra sales was normal.

It appear though that this Two Ton Truck was possibly instigated from Ford Canada as when Ford Australia took over assembly and sales from the local distributors they included the Olsen Two Ton Truck extension in their Factory approved products.

Actually it appears to be the only outside manufactured product along with the Ruckstell axle for cars and truck Ford Australia approved.

This Truck Extension is an Olsen Extension. This is a picture from a Ford Australia Travellers handbook of the Olsen Extension.
olsen

Usually photo's of T trucks show vehicles with so much loaded onto them that its hard to tell if they are even Model T's but this one shows what is possibly a TTT truck.
extension

What buyers were getting was a longer heavier chassis with a Ruckstell truck axle with bigger tires. Bigger slower and higher costs as it would be using more fuel.

Questions come to mind, were these extensions available in Canada, New Zealand South Africa, or other countries. as it appears Ford Canada may be the first source for the Olsen Extension and they were also available in Great Britain. They may have a Henry Ford approval as is the case for Ruckstell axles.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 12:09 am:

Your last photo shows a light duty rear wheel, suggesting this is NOT a 2 Ton Truck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 01:11 am:

Your right Burger the tires are light weight, but it still appears to be one of the Olsen extensions.

Trouble is often the details are blocked off by people or things.

This one has the right type of wheels and tire but appears to be a bit shorter in the Wheel base though the Olsen was available in the same wheel base as the one ton truck.
ext 02


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 01:13 am:

Don't know what happened there try again
ext


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 05:53 am:

After posting photos of Aussie trucks, some commenters have referred to various trucks having oversize tyres. Perhaps they too were TTT's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Miller, Sequim WA on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 12:09 pm:

Aftermarket 2 ton kits were quite common in the USA as well. Most of these kits would use the standard car chassis and not the TT chassis. The old advertisements show a frame extension with two rear springs parallel mounted with a driveshaft extension. These were common even before the TT was introduced in Dec 1917.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 12:13 pm:

It's interesting that in the last photo posted by Peter the truck has super heavy duty front wheels and tires but it looks like the axle and spring are stock.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 12:58 pm:

It is interesting to see the literature like this. I tend to think of pre-1930 vehicles as having
been seen much more in a practical light by their contemporary users than vehicles that came
later and "styling" tended to interfere with customizing them to do whatever job was needed
to be done with them.

As such, I think nothing is to be unexpected or dismissed. Farmer Brown and Industrial Andy
would lop and chop and bolt anything together back then, if it helped get the job done. The
zillions of "Ford accessories", from snowmobile kits to chain drive are perfect evidence that no
idea was too far out there.

Imagine a 52 Hudson or 64 Impala fit with snow tracks and skis ! But it was just normal thought
in 1920 !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 01:28 pm:

I beg to differ with the TTT maybe it should have been 2TT :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 12:03 am:

For Henry and others, Ford Australia sold trucks and chassis from July 1925 when with the bigger tires even the normal one Ton Version.

As they just over sold 10,000 in 1925,1926 1927, 1928,& 1929 total (yep they were still selling Model T's till March 1929) not many of the large tire chassis have survived or the Olsen Extension ones, though Alan Bennet in an old post alluded to one being for sale in South Australia.

What Ford Australia did was get body builders in each state to supply their own design body for a fixed price. The photo below is from their sales catalogue.

These trucks had 5:1 steering but no other alterations appear to have been made, I often wonder how heavy the steering would have been?

TT Vic

This is the Victorian version.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 12:35 am:

I like the look of the beefier front wheels and tyres. Makes it look more like heavier trucks of the period.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Page on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 06:11 am:

The picture posted below is the body style for the State of Queensland. ( Picture from the same source as Peter's )
All the Ton Trucks for Ford Australia ( July 1925 - 1929 ) had the larger tyres, and as Peter said they had a contract with individual suppliers in each State here in Australia.

This would have made them prime cases for the adaptation of the Olson Extension.

Are there any of our Canadian, New Zealand, or South African, Forum Members who can substantiate whether Ford Motor Company of Canada would have promoted the Olson Extension as a recognised accessory , as the Ruckstell Axles were.

Best regards, John Page, Australia.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Smith on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 10:34 am:

Fun thread!When I saw some of these pictures before, I was curious about the hub/spindle setup to get the 20" rims on the front axle. Does anyone know the details? I assume the fronts are 20". I have been told these were AUS/Canadian options only but cannot substantiate that. I have fooled with a few ideas to do this, but it is lower on the list of things to tackle for me at this point. I have seen some pictures of Olson extensions around before on TT's here in the states. One was on mine from the previous owner and removed before I bought it if I recall.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 12:16 pm:

There is a truck pictured in Google images that wears 20" wheels all around.
It is a recent photo. No idea who owns it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 12:34 pm:

This is a fun thread. I'm always amazed at how much folks put on a little 4 cylinder 20 HP engine, but I guess if you're not in a hurry it works just fine. Of course it must also be remembered that most of the guys who originally used theses trucks had been using horses or mules, so for them it was lightening speed all day long.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 04:38 am:

As some of you are interested here is something else to on the two Ton Trucks.
I hope you can read this, it gives a real good idea of what the Model T Truck was expected to do.
dated 1927 this is from a NSW mid west newspaper and why they sold.

dubbo


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 04:48 am:

As a callow youth in the mid 60's, I passed on a one ton truck with the heavy front wheels. It was all complete and in really good order, indicating it had not done much work. Who needs a slow old truck? My 1922 tourer was a much faster unit!

O for 20 20 hindsight!!
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Page on Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 05:06 am:

Allan,
Do you remember this Forum discussion from last year, and can you shed any more light on the Truck extensions you commented on at that time.

LINK : http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/506218/527961.html?1427759816

Best regards, John Page.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 05:16 am:

John, I had to make a short jackshaft to link the aux. trans on that truck. Once that was done, I fitted it with a Truefire ignition unit and drove it around the fellow's back yard. That was the only time he had it running and drivable. He managed to mess up the True fire next day, and as far as I know it has never run since.

I was impressed with the actual conversion kit. It all seemed well done, not that I can remember much detail. It was for sale later, but since he paid $18000 for it, I figured he would be wanting something in that ballpark, so it was not likely to be sold.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Page on Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 05:25 am:

Thanks Allan.
You didn't happen to take any photos of the set - up did you? It would be good to have some present day evidence that some have survived.

Best Regards, John


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