How Much Of Your Model T Do You Paint By Hand?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: How Much Of Your Model T Do You Paint By Hand?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 11:18 am:

I realize the Model T hobby runs the gammit from pristine paint jobs better than they came out the factory to complete rust buckets but for the average driver Model T do you use the old manual paint brush on parts more mechanical? My 19 Touring that was in storage for a few years cleaned up pretty good but parts like foot pedals, seat risers and top uprights are chipped and need of a refresher. I am not at the point of using a brush on sheet metal parts but wonder if there is any downside to using what many probably did during the original Model T hay day?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale Peterson College Place, WA on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 11:31 am:

For much of the running gear parts and frame I usually use Por 15 and a brush. Gives a pretty tough finish and doesn't look brushed on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, mostly in Dearborn on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 11:35 am:

My uncles told me that several paints available during the thirties and forties were marketed for brush painting automobile bodies. The told me the paints flowed out well and produced surprisingly acceptable results.

PORs Chassis Black has the same characteristic and I use it on my axles and frame.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 11:39 am:

Back when I lived in CT, there was a really nice 1970 Dodge Challenger on display at a show with a freshly rebuilt engine. The orange paint on the engine and valve covers was the best I had ever seen, so I asked him what paint he used. He told me he painted them with POR 15 with a brush! I was amazed at how well it flowed out, they looked amazing. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom 30 miles N of Memphis TN on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 11:54 am:

Take some black enamel paint and add some boiled linseed oil to it, apply with a good camel hair brush and you will be amazed how well it levels and the gloss it produces. You'll be hard pressed to tell it from sprayed.

If you have a project a kid is working on, I recommend this and stress to them that wet sanding and blocking sandable primer on the parts are necessary to a good job. One day when they learn to use a spray gun, they will produce excellent results everytime. They will also know which areas are well suited to a brush.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 12:17 pm:

I have had very good luck with brushing slow drying enamels. Dulux was my favorite but is no longer available. I use a tractor paint now. It and Rustoleum dry slowly also. The slow drying lets it "Flow Out" as Tom mentioned. Frames and wheels come out better than spraying as you can apply it equally in corners and behind things. Body and fenders should be sprayed. A soft brush like camels hair works well. A cheap brush will shed hair but can be epoxied at the base.
I mixed the cream I wanted for my Buick from White and yellow with a touch of black.



Also these Harley forks were brushed a few days ago. They have nice gloss now but it will fade faster than better paints. I like that for older things. This green was mixed from Caterpillar yellow and Black with a touch of red.



With a little practice, good results can happen. The enamel is softer than epoxies and catalyzed paints so care should be exercised.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 12:44 pm:

"Rustbullet".... Excellent durability and rust prevention / conversion characteristics. Brush on to flow (will even out) into seams and crevices, or can be sprayed. Not UV sensitive; can be sanded; and 'flash time' is about four hours. Perhaps it's time to check out some technological improvements???
(PS - I also prefer my work to be smarter & easier than working harder! And, no more POR-15 for me...)
Marv


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Laverne Buller on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 01:41 pm:

I had the frame, of my 23 Tudor, including springs, everything except the rear end, powder coated. Any parts small enough to fit in my dedicated oven, I powder coated myself.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 01:42 pm:

I paint small parts by hand, holding a rattle can of Rustoleum black.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 03:12 pm:

I powder coat all of the small parts and paint a few little things. I like the powder coating.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 03:23 pm:

Peeling powder coat is one of the worst PITAs I have ever had the displeasure
of trying to fix. People think it is bulletproof and it is NOT. Once an edge begins
to peel, you are in for a real b!tch of a job getting powdercoat off to redo it or go
with paint.

I paint everything myself. I have an HVLP for bigger jobs, but most just get the
rattle can. I came to T ownership BECAUSE of the "Farmer Brown" level of finish
is better than stupidly over-restored and expensive paint jobs that are expected
of that Packard Caribbean or 66 T-bird.

Like a client of mine who moved to the country to get away from all the BS when
he retired ... he cut down 2 acres of woods and put in a lawn and then realized it
was a monster of his own making ... he had no time for anything because he brought
the BS (lawn) with him ! Woods take minimal time and effort. Lawns are a constant
drain of time and money. Same goes for how we see our cars. T's look best when
"barn fresh". They are also easy to maintain and enjoy that way, as compared to
trying to make them look like something they never were. That's like tearing out
the woods and taking on a golf course. No thanks. :-P


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 03:29 pm:

Painting by hand is described as coach painting. For an introduction to this method see http://coachpainting.info/traditional.html

http://www.da7c.co.uk/technical_torque_articles/brush_painting.htm

http://www.demeulebossen.be/completecarriage00schr_1_.pdf

It is a lost art to use a brush on a panel and end up with a deep mirror finish. Yet there is a business for hand finished vehicles... http://www.wellingtoncarriagecompany.co.uk/carriage-restoration/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By P. Jamison- PA on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 05:44 pm:

John Barnard paints narrow boats (canal boats) in the UK. His technique might work on old cars, too. He uses a sponge roller, then smooths off with a brush. He made a series of YouTube videos which are useful, if you'd like to learn more. My thought is to use yacht paint like he does, which is designed to withstand the weather, dry smooth, and look good. A good source for that is Jamestown Distributors: (http://www.jamestowndistributors.com).

Here is video #1:

https://youtu.be/ZiL0UG8VYII

Phil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris from Long Beach, CA on Friday, May 06, 2016 - 01:51 pm:

In 1950 I purchased a 40 Plymouth Sedan in prime paint for $300. I went to Western Auto and purchased a quart can of blue paint with a tall plastic cap on it. Under the cap was a powder puff. Wow was that a good paint job and only $7.00


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Woolf on Friday, May 06, 2016 - 09:20 pm:

Phil,

I just finished applying Gleam boat varnish from Jamestown Distributors to a firewall for my brother's 1911 T. I used the sponge roller and brush technique. It gives a nice finish and has the UV protection. I sanded with 220 grit between coats. After the fourth coat, I am block wet sanding with 1500 grit sandpaper and finishing with a fine rubbing compound. I'm very pleased with the results.

Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Friday, May 06, 2016 - 10:16 pm:

burger!!! i think you need a new power coater. its been on my indian & my 1913 t for 25 years now no peel. if you want to change color. just burn it off with a propane torch. then sand blast. i put it on a friends 1911 overland running gear, everything sandblasted & coated $ 375.00 . charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Friday, May 06, 2016 - 10:36 pm:

I have been using powder coat for several years. I cleans up easy and seems durable but I have to run back and forth to the coaters place. I think I will try the por 15. I can do that easier than waste time running back and forth on the one day a week I get off. Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Saturday, May 07, 2016 - 12:23 am:

Wooden Spokes with primer and enamel and interior of block, pan, mag ring coils and hogshead with Glyptal. Everything else is sprayed. Jim Patrick

Oil based Primer


Gloss Black Enamel


Glyptal Red insulating paint


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Saturday, May 07, 2016 - 01:05 am:

Oh! And my demountable rims with Sherwin Williams Silver Brite. Silver Brite was developed for painting exterior metal roofs so it is very durable and looks like brite silver plating. Goes on very nicely and when dry it is as smooth as if sprayed. Jim Patrick

Silver Brite


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Skingley ......Westland, Michigan on Saturday, May 07, 2016 - 06:54 am:

My hint for painting the enamels is the small foam throw away brush. It can be put on with strokes and small pats to flow the paint. No clean up....the thickness of hand painting is greater and this is nice on many parts. Engine, frame, axles springs etc....Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard E Moore Jr. Pickwick lake Tenn. on Saturday, May 07, 2016 - 08:15 am:

I paint all my towboats with awl grip. There's a procedure you have to go through but the results are amazing. Can't tell from a spray job and it last for ever.


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