Mounting front Speedster fenders

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Mounting front Speedster fenders
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza on Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 05:39 pm:

Is there a specific fender iron that I need to use to mount rootlieb speedster fenders on the front of a Model T. I have the flat top style of fender.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza on Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 06:27 pm:

These are the irons I have


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza on Friday, April 22, 2016 - 07:36 am:

Another question, I'm using the longer hood and the column will need to be moved rearward at the steering bracket. Will moving it just a tad affect steering geometry? The angle of the column is easily adjusted and already got that covered. Anyone?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Friday, April 22, 2016 - 08:02 am:

A friend of mine has a speedster with flat Rootlieb fenders. The fenders are too close to the top of the tire. They rub, especially in the rear. Part of that is because rear spring leafs were removed. I'm thinking the front fender irons need to be reshaped to put the fenders higher. Also, in order to make the top of the fender parallel with the ground, it looks to me like the angle of the fender needs to closed up a little. I too would be interested in what others have done.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza on Friday, April 22, 2016 - 08:11 am:

I would think I'm going to be doing some heating and bending to make it the way I want it. Good thing I'd the springs just have reversed main leaves so clearance shouldn't be a big deal


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Friday, April 22, 2016 - 09:27 am:

The speedster I mentioned belongs to a friend of mine. It was restored for him. It is dropped by using a 2-1/2" dropped axle and 26-27 front spindles, which drops it another 1/2", for a total of 3". The rear end was dropped by raising the rear cross-member. I put some 1-1/2"? blocks under the rear fender irons to try and raise the fenders up. That didn't really work. If I raised them up where they should be, the tips of the fenders were pointing up and the top of the fender wasn't parallel to the ground. That is where I think the fenders needed to be bent to a little sharper angle. That's hard on this car because it is all painted now. The front fenders needed to have the irons bent, I believe like you are finding.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Rootlieb on Friday, April 22, 2016 - 12:11 pm:

Any front fender irons will work. I first start by taking all the curve out of the iron with a BIG hammer on an anvil. No heat. Bolt the iron back on the frame. Heat the iron just past the headlight hole and raise the iron upward 3" or so. Then heat the iron 1 1/2" from the end and bend horizontal. You need enough room to land the fender bracket. You can set the fender on and usually it doesn't fit. The fender needs to be opened up by laying it on the floor and pushing down at the crest of the radius. This will spread open the skirt and allow it to better fit. The skirt lays on top of the fender iron and turns and goes back to the running board just above the headlight hole. You will also have to twist the nose to get it to fit correctly. Don't be afraid to really push the fender around. The only thing that will happen is the skirt at the top where the bead ends, may buckle. If it happens, a hammer and a dolly knock it right out. These speedster fenders were designed for use on a lowered chassis. If you have a stock height chassis and put these fenders on it, you will have an excessive amount of tire clearance. A stock height chassis should use 10-11 Torpedo fenders for correct tire clearance. No matter what fender you use it takes a lot of pushing and pulling and fussing and fighting to get them to fit right. To mount a set of fenders on a car, beginning to end, takes me about 2 days. And I've done this for 40yrs. But it usually starts with the frame and running board brackets being out of shape and getting those key pieces right before moving to the fenders. In response to Verne's issue with the rear fenders hitting the tire, it sounds like the entire chassis is to low to get the fenders to fit right I never take leafs out of the springs. I don't reverse the eyelets either. I use full stock springs front and back to start with and 9 times out of ten at the end of the dry build I send the rear spring off to be de-arched as the rear of the car is usually higher than the front. Hope this helps.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza on Friday, April 22, 2016 - 12:30 pm:

Thanks Tom! Sounds good to me, not to complicated, just bend fit, step back, look and try again until just right. I am using reversed springs as I don't want it real low, just a smidgen less clearance and everything is adjustable at this time!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Friday, April 22, 2016 - 06:20 pm:

Thanks Tom! That sure helps with understanding what to do.


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