New to Fords. Looking for direction.

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: New to Fords. Looking for direction.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Blum on Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 08:37 pm:

I am restoring two 1926 Model T Tudor's. One is for a friend who is supplying all the parts he acquired. He bought it from a guy who had one of them partly done with just the frame, motor, trans, diff and wheels. Unfortunately he filled it with plain water and then let it sit for 30+ years. Now the radiator outlet tube, engine inlet tube and return pipe are all rotted out.

My first question is do you think the block and head are going to be OK? I can see red buildup inside the head but when I poke around it all seems solid.As DeliveredWater InletRad outlet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Friday, April 22, 2016 - 06:30 am:

What you are showing is the normal look of a T block and radiator when plain water is used. If they used distilled water it is even more severe.

I would pull the cylinder head and see how bad it is. The radiator is likely no good. But you never know, it might clean up and work fine too.

The blocks tend to be thin between the #3 and #4 cylinders at the floor of the water passage. The block can be fixed if it is rusted thru. Here's one I fixed:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/270852.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Friday, April 22, 2016 - 07:21 am:

New radiator inlets and outlets are available from Brassworks.

http://www.thebrassworks.net/shop/index.php?cPath=14_31_93


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, April 22, 2016 - 09:03 am:

Water inlets and outlets always have the most amount of rust and rot because both the interior AND the exterior surfaces are in contact with water where the hose attaches (there is always water between the hose and the exterior of the inlet/outlet right up to the point of the clamp).

In other words, they simultaneously rust from the inside out and the outside in where they are covered by the hose.

The same thing occurs at the ends ends of the steel pipe on the passenger side of the motor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, April 22, 2016 - 09:34 am:

The Model T is relatively simple. But being different from other cars, it contains some surprises. Example: You don't just unbolt the starter and pull it off, because that might wreck your magneto. Forewarned is forearmed.

http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG80.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Friday, April 22, 2016 - 09:56 am:

The rusted up radiator outlet and cylinder head is what you usually find in T's that have set up.

The block and head is probably still good. Over the years people have picked up a T like the one that's shown, pulled the head, cleaned and flushed out the block, cleaned and carefully drilled out the water passageways in the block and head.
Not always but sometimes performed a valve job.
Repaired or replaced the radiator.

Probably replace the transmission bands and usually that's all it needs assuming that you removed the oil pan lower and checked out the rod fit up.

If your doing a complete restoration you would want to more of course. It just depends on how much you want to spend.
It could be that it wont take much to make it a good running T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, April 22, 2016 - 09:58 am:

Jack,

Welcome to the forum and to the hobby.

Based on the photos it looks like the engine & chassis was restored -- is that correct? If so, I would suggest you consider flushing the block and head before you remove the head. Once you pull the head it is easier to clean the head but harder to clean the inside of the block at least by flushing. You can put a block off plate on inlet side of the block or you can turn the inlet casting upside down, put a radiator hose on it etc. so you can fill the engine up with radiator flush or similar product/mixture. Initially you could flush with water and that will probably flush out a lot of rust.

Note, "IF" it was still holding the water after 30 years, you have a chance that it may clean up. But you might also find that the rust was what was sealing something....

If the engine was rebuilt and the bearings, crankshaft, etc. look good -- you do NOT want to drop the block off and have it "boiled out" by the radiator shop etc. Many of those mixtures will eat up/destroy the babbit bearings in the block. (Ok -- truth in posting -- it has been years since I had something cleaned commercially. Back in the last century the chemicals would eat up the rust but also the babbit. I do not know if they have chemicals now that will remove the rust / gunk and not hurt the babbit bearing material.)

I would also recommend you locate the nearest Model T Ford club chapter. They are listed at: http://www.mtfca.com/clubpages/chapters.htm and http://www.modelt.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=5&Itemid=15 and will be a great help to you.

Again from the photo it looks like the chassis you loaded was restored. IF that was just cleaned up and new paint, then it will probably need a lot of work. But if they did the inside of the engine, axles, transmission etc. as nice as the outside looks – you may be able to:

1. Clean the rust out of the water passages,
2. Have the radiator cleaned and repaired or replaced
3. Repair or replace the upper water outlet/fan bracket
4. Add a temporary gas tank (secure it safely – they have burned up several projects when the temp gas tank shifted and started a fire (see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kee_Bird As Darryl Greenamyer was taxiing the aircraft onto the frozen lake, the B-29's "putt-putt" auxiliary power unit's jury-rigged fuel tank began to leak gasoline into the rear fuselage. Fire broke out and quickly spread to the rest of the aircraft.
5. Check the engine, transmission, rear axle, front wheel bearings etc. for proper clearances, lubrication and no rust.
6. Check wheels and tires for safety.
7. Add a temporary seat that is secured
8. Find a privately owned area to drive the chassis (it would probably be difficult to get it tagged and ensured without lights, etc.
9. Find someone who knows Model Ts to teach you how to drive it and go for a test drive.

If you can obtain some history on the two cars you may be able to verify if the rear axle has the original babbitt style thrust washers (a known safety issue) or if they were replaced with the bronze thrust washers.

Again, someone knowledgeable about the Model Ts could look over the chassis, check bearings etc and get a good feel if the previous owner had gotten it ready for testing (which the water in the radiator would might indicate).

Please also check out the safety items at the second entry at the posting at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/506218/576808.html .

Again, welcome to the forum and to Model T Fords.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Blum on Friday, April 22, 2016 - 09:54 pm:

This is great info. Thank you all so much. I'll keep you all posted on my progress. I think it's going to be a fun project. I have restored Pontiac's for years and this is my first Ford anything.
68 GTO 455cid with custom EFI and 6 speed T56 trans


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, April 22, 2016 - 11:24 pm:

Jack,

Nice looking GTO. And it looks like you already have the basic Ford Model T Color down.

Ok -- up until 1914 in the USA Model Ts came in colors other than black and starting again with the 1926 models colors were introduced. (ref: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/intro.htm and see Trent's article "All Model T's Were Black" scroll down a little at: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/P-R.htm#paint1 . And from: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/1926.htm For 1926 - COLORS: All cars were painted black, with black fenders, initially. Closed cars were then offered in colors: green for the Tudor and Coupe, and Maroon for the Fordor. Other options offered later in 1926, perhaps for the “1927” models.

And at: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/1927.htm for 1927 models: COLORS: All cars had black fenders. Various body color options, ultimately on all models. Black no longer available except on special order.

And Fords sold in some countries such as Australia never went to “only black.”

Again welcome aboard.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, April 23, 2016 - 09:18 am:

Good looking Pontiac Jack! A good point to remember about T's is they don't have REAL brakes!

I'm thinking you may already know or have heard this before.
How to stop a T is a question that gets asked on the forum fairly often, especially from folks who have inherited or just bought a T and new to the world of Model T's.

A T's braking system isn't like stopping a modern car. A rule of thumb to remember is to drive it like it doesn't have brakes. Once you learn that it will become easy to stop a T.

Good luck and keep us posted.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration